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Western blot analysis of ATF-2 Control Cell Extracts using Phospho-ATF-2 (Thr69/71) Antibody #9225 (upper) and ATF-2 (20F1) Rabbit mAb #9226 (lower).

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Product Description

Nonphosphorylated ATF-2 Control Cell Extracts: Total extracts from NIH/3T3 cells, prepared without treatment, to serve as a negative control. Supplied in SDS Sample Buffer. Store at -20ºC.

Phosphorylated ATF-2 Control Cell Extracts: Total extracts from NIH/3T3 cells, prepared with anisomycin treatment, to serve as a positive control. Supplied in SDS Sample Buffer. Store at -20ºC.


The transcription factor ATF-2 (also called CRE-BP1) binds to both AP-1 and CRE DNA response elements and is a member of the ATF/CREB family of leucine zipper proteins (1). ATF-2 interacts with a variety of viral oncoproteins and cellular tumor suppressors and is a target of the SAPK/JNK and p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways (2-4). Various forms of cellular stress, including genotoxic agents, inflammatory cytokines, and UV irradiation, stimulate the transcriptional activity of ATF-2. Cellular stress activates ATF-2 by phosphorylation of Thr69 and Thr71 (2-4). Both SAPK and p38 MAPK have been shown to phosphorylate ATF-2 at these sites in vitro and in cells transfected with ATF-2. Mutations of these sites result in the loss of stress-induced transcription by ATF-2 (2-4). In addition, mutations at these sites reduce the ability of E1A and Rb to stimulate gene expression via ATF-2 (2).


1.  Abdel-Hafiz, H.A. et al. (1992) Mol. Endocrinol. 6, 2079-2089.

2.  Gupta, S. et al. (1995) Science 267, 389-393.

3.  van Dam, H. et al. (1995) EMBO J. 14, 1798-1811.

4.  Livingstone, C. et al. (1995) EMBO J. 14, 1785-1797.



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