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Western blot analysis of extracts from PC-3 cells, untreated or LY294002/wortmannin-treated, and NIH/3T3 cells, serum-starved or PDGF-treated, using Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (D9E) XP® Rabbit mAb (upper) or Akt (pan) (C67E7) Rabbit mAb #4691 (lower).

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Confocal immunofluorescent analysis of C2C12 cells, LY294002-treated (left) or insulin-treated (right), using Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (D9E) XP® Rabbit mAb (green). Actin filaments have been labeled with Alexa Fluor® 555 phalloidin #8953 (red). Blue pseudocolor = DRAQ5®#4084 (fluorescent DNA dye).

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Western blot analysis of recombinant Akt1, Akt2 and Akt3 proteins, and extracts from various cell lines, using Akt (pan) (C67E7) Rabbit mAb.

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After the primary antibody is bound to the target protein, a complex with HRP-linked secondary antibody is formed. The LumiGLO® is added and emits light during enzyme catalyzed decomposition.

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After the primary antibody is bound to the target protein, a complex with HRP-linked secondary antibody is formed. The LumiGLO® is added and emits light during enzyme catalyzed decomposition.

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Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded MDA-MB-468 xenograft using Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (D9E) XP® Rabbit mAb (left) or PTEN (138G6) Rabbit mAb #9559 (right). Note the presence of P-Akt staining in the PTEN deficient MDA-MB-468 cells.

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Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded human melanoma using Akt (pan) (C67E7) Rabbit mAb.

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Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded human breast carcinoma comparing SignalStain® Antibody Diluent #8112 (left) to TBST/5% normal goat serum (right) using Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (D9E) XP® Rabbit mAb #4060.

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Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded human breast carcinoma using Akt (pan) (C67E7) Rabbit mAb in the presence of control peptide (left) or Akt (pan) Blocking Peptide #1085 (right).

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Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded human breast carcinoma using Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (D9E) XP® Rabbit mAb.

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Immunohistochemical analysis using Akt (pan) (C67E7) Rabbit mAb on SignalSlide (TM) Phospho-Akt (Ser473) IHC Controls #8101 (paraffin-embedded LNCaP cells, untreated (left) or LY294002-treated (right)).

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Immunohistochemical analysis using Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (D9E) XP® Rabbit mAb on SignalSlide® Phospho-Akt (Ser473) IHC Controls #8101 (paraffin-embedded LNCaP cells, untreated (left) or LY294002-treated (right)).

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Flow cytometric analysis of Jurkat cells using Akt (pan) (C67E7) Rabbit mAb (blue) compared to a nonspecific negative control antibody (red).

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Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded human lung carcinoma using Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (D9E) XP® Rabbit mAb.

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Confocal immunofluorescent analysis of C2C12 cells, LY294002-treated (left) or insulin-treated (right), using Akt (pan) (C67E7) Rabbit mAb (green). Actin filaments have been labeled with Alexa Fluor® 555 phalloidin (red). Blue pseudocolor = DRAQ5™ (fluorescent DNA dye).

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Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded PTEN heterozygous mutant mouse endometrium using Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (D9E) XP® Rabbit mAb. (Tissue section courtesy of Dr. Sabina Signoretti, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.)

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Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded U-87MG xenograft, untreated (left) or lambda phosphatase-treated (right), using Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (D9E) XP® Rabbit mAb.

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Immunohistochemical analysis of frozen SKOV3 xenograft using Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (D9E) XP® Rabbit mAb.

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Flow cytometric analysis of Jurkat cells, untreated (green) or treated with LY294002 #9901, wortmannin #9951 and U0126 #9903 (blue), using Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (D9E) XP® Rabbit mAb compared to a nonspecific negative control antibody (red).

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Image
Product Includes Quantity Applications Reactivity MW(kDa) Isotype
Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (D9E) XP® Rabbit mAb 4060 100 µl
Western Blotting Immunoprecipitation Immunohistochemistry Immunofluorescence Flow Cytometry
H M R Hm Mk Dm Z B 60 Rabbit IgG
Akt (pan) (C67E7) Rabbit mAb 4691 100 µl
Western Blotting Immunoprecipitation Immunohistochemistry Immunofluorescence Flow Cytometry
H M R Mk Dm 60 Rabbit IgG
Akt Control Cell Extracts 9273 200 µl
 
Anti-rabbit IgG, HRP-linked Antibody 7074 100 µl
Western Blotting
All Goat 
Anti-biotin, HRP-linked Antibody 7075 100 µl
Goat 
Biotinylated Protein Ladder Detection Pack 7727 100 µl
 
20X LumiGLO® Reagent and 20X Peroxide 7003 5 ml each
Western Blotting
 

Product Description

The PhosphoPlus® Akt (Ser473) Antibody Kit provides reagents and protocols for the rapid analysis of Akt phosphorylation.


Specificity / Sensitivity

Phospho-Akt (Ser473) Antibody detects endogenous levels of Akt1 only when phosphorylated at Ser473, and Akt2 and Akt3 when phosphorylated at equivalent sites. It does not recognize Akt phosphorylated at other sites, nor does it recognize phosphorylated forms of related kinases such as PKC or p70 S6 kinase. Akt Antibody detects endogenous levels of total Akt1, Akt2 and Akt3 proteins. It does not cross-react with related kinases.


Source / Purification

Monoclonal antibody is produced by immunizing animals with a synthetic phosphopeptide corresponding to residues surrounding Ser473 or the carboxy-terminal sequence of Akt.

Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).


1.  Franke, T.F. et al. (1997) Cell 88, 435-7.

2.  Burgering, B.M. and Coffer, P.J. (1995) Nature 376, 599-602.

3.  Franke, T.F. et al. (1995) Cell 81, 727-36.

4.  Cross, D.A. et al. (1995) Nature 378, 785-9.

5.  Alessi, D.R. et al. (1996) EMBO J 15, 6541-51.

6.  Sarbassov, D.D. et al. (2005) Science 307, 1098-101.

7.  Diehl, J.A. et al. (1998) Genes Dev 12, 3499-511.

8.  Jacinto, E. et al. (2006) Cell 127, 125-37.

9.  Cardone, M.H. et al. (1998) Science 282, 1318-21.

10.  Brunet, A. et al. (1999) Cell 96, 857-68.

11.  Zimmermann, S. and Moelling, K. (1999) Science 286, 1741-4.

12.  Cantley, L.C. and Neel, B.G. (1999) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 96, 4240-5.

13.  Vlahos, C.J. et al. (1994) J Biol Chem 269, 5241-8.

14.  Hajduch, E. et al. (2001) FEBS Lett 492, 199-203.

15.  Gesbert, F. et al. (2000) J Biol Chem 275, 39223-30.

16.  Zhou, B.P. et al. (2001) Nat Cell Biol 3, 245-52.

17.  Navé, B.T. et al. (1999) Biochem J 344 Pt 2, 427-31.

18.  Inoki, K. et al. (2002) Nat Cell Biol 4, 648-57.

19.  Manning, B.D. et al. (2002) Mol Cell 10, 151-62.


Entrez-Gene Id 207
Swiss-Prot Acc. P31749

Protein Specific References

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For Research Use Only. Not For Use In Diagnostic Procedures.
Cell Signaling Technology® is a trademark of Cell Signaling Technology, Inc.
PhosphoPlus® is a trademark of Cell Signaling Technology, Inc.
LumiGLO® is a registered trademark of Kirkegaard & Perry Laboratories.
U.S. Patent No. 5,675,063.