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Product Includes Quantity Applications Reactivity MW(kDa) Isotype
Phospho-4E-BP1 (Thr37/46) (236B4) Rabbit mAb 2855 40 µl
Western Blotting Immunohistochemistry Immunofluorescence Flow Cytometry
H M R Mk Dm 15 to 20 Rabbit IgG
Non-phospho-4E-BP1 (Thr46) (87D12) Rabbit mAb 4923 40 µl
Western Blotting Immunofluorescence Flow Cytometry
H M R Mk 15-20 Rabbit IgG
Phospho-4E-BP1 (Ser65) Antibody 9451 40 µl
Western Blotting Immunoprecipitation
H M R Mk 15 to 20 Rabbit 
4E-BP1 (53H11) Rabbit mAb 9644 40 µl
Western Blotting Immunoprecipitation Immunohistochemistry Immunofluorescence Flow Cytometry
H M R Mk 15-20 Rabbit IgG
4E-BP2 Antibody 2845 40 µl
Western Blotting Immunoprecipitation Immunohistochemistry Flow Cytometry
H M R Mk B 15 to 20 Rabbit 
Phospho-4E-BP1 (Thr70) Antibody 9455 40 µl
Western Blotting Immunoprecipitation
H M R Mk 15 to 20 Rabbit 
Anti-rabbit IgG, HRP-linked Antibody 7074 100 µl
Western Blotting
All Goat 

Product Description

The 4E-BP Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate regulation of cap-dependent translation within the cell. The kit contains primary and secondary antibodies to perform four Western blots with each antibody.


Specificity / Sensitivity

Phospho-4E-BP1 (Thr37/46) Rabbit mAb detects endogenous levels of 4E-BP1 only when phosphorylated at Thr37 and/or Thr46, and may cross-react with 4E-BP2 and 4E-BP3 when phosphorylated at equivalent sites. Nonphospho-4E-BP1 (Thr46) (87D12) Rabbit mAb detects endogenous levels of 4E-BP1 only when dephosphorylated at Thr46. This antibody cross-reacts with 4E-BP2 and 4E-BP3 dephosphorylated at equivalent sites. Phospho-4E-BP1 (Ser65) Antibody detects endogenous levels of 4E-BP1 when phosphorylated at Ser65, and may also recognize 4E-BP1 when phosphorylated at Ser101. Phospho-4E-BP1 (Ser65) (174A9) Rabbit mAb detects endogenous levels of 4E-BP1 when phosphorylated at Ser65. Phospho-4E-BP1 (Thr70) Antibody detects endogenous levels of 4E-BP1 only when phosphorylated at Thr70. 4E-BP1 (53H11) Rabbit mAb detects endogenous levels of total 4E-BP1 protein. 4E-BP2 Antibody detects endogenous levels of total 4E-BP2 independent of phosphorylation and does not cross-react significantly with 4E-BP1.


Source / Purification

Monoclonal antibody is produced by immunizing animals with a synthetic phosphopeptide corresponding to residues surrounding Thr37 and Thr46 of mouse 4E-BP1, residues surrounding Thr46 of human 4E-BP1, or Ser112 of human 4E-BP1. Polyclonal antibodies are produced by immunizing animals with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the residues at the carboxy-terminus of human 4E-BP2 (#2845), or phosphopeptides surrounding mouse Ser65 (#9451) and human Thr70 (#5078) 4E-BP1. Polyclonal antibodies were purified by protein A and peptide affinity chromatography.

Translation repressor protein 4E-BP1 (also known as PHAS-1) inhibits cap-dependent translation by binding to the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 disrupts this interaction and results in activation of cap-dependent translation (1). Both the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway and FRAP/mTOR kinase regulate 4E-BP1 activity (2,3). Multiple 4E-BP1 residues are phosphorylated in vivo (4). While phosphorylation by FRAP/mTOR at Thr37 and Thr46 does not prevent the binding of 4E-BP1 to eIF4E, it is thought to prime 4E-BP1 for subsequent phosphorylation at Ser65 and Thr70 (5).


4E-BP2 and 4E-BP3 share high sequence homology with 4E-BP1, including conservation of the major FRAP/mTOR-dependent phosphorylation sites. Preliminary data suggests that phosphorylation of 4E-BP2 is regulated in a similar manner to that of 4E-BP1, although phosphorylation of this protein has not been as extensively studied (6).


1.  Pause, A. et al. (1994) Nature 371, 762-7.

2.  Brunn, G.J. et al. (1997) Science 277, 99-101.

3.  Gingras, A.C. et al. (1998) Genes Dev 12, 502-13.

4.  Fadden, P. et al. (1997) J Biol Chem 272, 10240-7.

5.  Gingras, A.C. et al. (1999) Genes Dev 13, 1422-37.

6.  Lin, T.A. and Lawrence, J.C. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 30199-30204.


Entrez-Gene Id 1978, 1979, 8637
Swiss-Prot Acc. Q13541, Q13542, O60516


For Research Use Only. Not For Use In Diagnostic Procedures.
Cell Signaling Technology® is a trademark of Cell Signaling Technology, Inc.
U.S. Patent No. 5,675,063.