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Product listing: RagC (D31G9) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q9HB90 #5466 to PathScan® Total p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) Sandwich ELISA Kit, UniProt ID P27361 #7050

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The mTORC1 kinase complex is a critical regulator of cell growth (1,2). Its activity is modulated by energy levels, growth factors, and amino acids via signaling through Akt, MAPK, and AMPK pathways (3,4). Recent studies found that the four related GTPases, RagA, RagB, RagC, and RagD, interact with raptor within the mTORC1 complex (1,2). These interactions are both necessary and sufficient for mTORC1 activation in response to amino acid signals (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM, MUC18, CD146) is an immunoglobulin superfamily member originally described as a cell surface adhesion protein and marker of the progression and metastasis of melanoma (1,2). Expression of MCAM protein is seen in vascular endothelial cells, activated T lymphocytes, smooth muscle, and bone marrow stromal cells. Research studies demonstrate increased MCAM expression in endothelial cells from angiogenesis-related disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, tumors, and chronic renal failure (3). MCAM-expressing human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) in the hematopoietic microenvironment are responsible for maintaining the self-renewal of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) through direct contact between hMSC and those cells (2). Related studies suggest that activation of the Notch signaling pathway may also, in part, play a role in HSPC maintenance (4). Additional research indicates that MCAM may play a role in multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune inflammatory disease that affects central nervous system neurons. Endothelial MCAM within the blood-brain barrier act as adhesion receptors that permit lymphocytes to transmigrate across the barrier and produce the inflammatory lesions that characterize the disorder (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine kinases that are activated by cyclins and govern eukaryotic cell cycle progression. While CDK5 shares high sequence homology with its family members, it is thought mainly to function in postmitotic neurons to regulate the cytoarchitecture of these cells. Analogous to cyclins, the regulatory subunits p35 and p39 associate with and activate CDK5 despite the lack of sequence homology. CDK5 is ubiquitously expressed, with high levels of kinase activity detected primarily in the nervous system due to the narrow expression pattern of p35 and p39 in post-mitotic neurons. A large number of CDK5 substrates have been identified although no substrates have been specifically attributed to p35 or p39. Substrates of CDK5 include p35, PAK1, Src, β-catenin, tau, neurofilament-H, neurofilament-M, synapsin-1, APP, DARPP32, PP1-inhibitor, and Rb. p35 is rapidly degraded (T1/2 <20 min) by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (1). However, p35 stability increases as CDK5 kinase activity decreases, likely as a result of decreased phosphorylation of p35 at Thr138 by CDK5 (2). Proteolytic cleavage of p35 by calpain produces p25 upon neurotoxic insult, resulting in prolonged activation of CDK5 by p25. Research studies have shown accumulation of p25 in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: LEF1 and TCF are members of the high mobility group (HMG) DNA binding protein family of transcription factors that consists of the following: Lymphoid Enhancer Factor 1 (LEF1), T Cell Factor 1 (TCF1/TCF7), TCF3/TCF7L1, and TCF4/TCF7L2 (1). LEF1 and TCF1/TCF7 were originally identified as important factors regulating early lymphoid development (2) and act downstream in Wnt signaling. LEF1 and TCF bind to Wnt response elements to provide docking sites for β-catenin, which translocates to the nucleus to promote the transcription of target genes upon activation of Wnt signaling (3). LEF1 and TCF are dynamically expressed during development and aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling pathway is involved in many types of cancers including colon cancer (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). It is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and referred to as autophagy-related (Atg) genes. These proteins are involved in the formation of cytoplasmic vacuoles called autophagosomes that are delivered to lysosomes for degradation.The class III type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3KC3)/Vps34 regulates vacuolar trafficking as well as autophagy (4,5). Multiple proteins have been shown to be associated with Vsp34, including: p105/Vsp15, Beclin-1, UVRAG, Atg14, and Rubicon, which can determine Vsp34 function (6-11). UVRAG (UV radiation resistance-associated gene) is associated with the Beclin-1/PI3KC3 complex and promotes PI3KC3 enzymatic activity and autophagy, while suppressing proliferation (11). Beclin-1 binding to UVRAG promotes both autophagosome maturation and endocytic trafficking (12). UVRAG is also a potential tumor suppressor protein with frameshift mutations observed in colon and gastric carcinomas (13,14).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant for formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The JARID (Jumonji/AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein) family contains four members: JARID1A (also RBP2 and RBBP2), JARID1B (also PLU-1), JARID1C (also SMCX) and JARID1D (also SMCY) (4). In addition to the JmJC domain, these proteins contain JmJN, BRIGHT, C5HC2 zinc-finger, and PHD domains, the latter of which binds to methylated histone H3 (Lys9) (4). All four JARID proteins demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys4; JARID1B also demethylates mono-methyl histone H3 Lys4 (5-7). JARID1A is a critical RB-interacting protein and is required for Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional repression during ES cell differentiation (8). A JARID1A-NUP98 gene fusion is associated with myeloid leukemia (9). JARID1B, which interacts with many proteins including c-Myc and HDAC4, may play a role in cell fate decisions by blocking terminal differentiation (10-12). JARID1B is over-expressed in many breast cancers and may act by repressing multiple tumor suppressor genes including BRCA1 and HOXA5 (13,14). JARID1C has been found in a complex with HDAC1, HDAC2, G9a and REST, which binds to and represses REST target genes in non-neuronal cells (7). JARID1C mutations are associated with X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy (15,16). JARID1D is largely uncharacterized.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DRB-sensitivity inducing factor (DSIF), a heterodimer composed of SPT4 and SPT5, is capable of both facilitating and inhibiting RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) activity (1-3). DSIF, together with NELF (Negative Elongation Factor), inhibits RNAPII elongation, resulting in promoter proximal pausing of RNAPII as it awaits additional signaling to resume transcription (4). The release of promoter proximal pausing is signaled through phosphorylation of the RNAPII C-terminal domain (CTD) and NELF by positive transcription elongation factor (P-TEFb) (5). P-TEFb also phosphorylates SPT5 at Thr4 within the evolutionarily conserved heptapeptide repeat motif. This phosphorylation event switches DSIF from a transcriptional repressor to an activator where it becomes a critical factor for transcriptional elongation (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The zinc finger transcription factor GATA-2 is widely expressed and plays an essential role in many developmental processes (1). Studies on GATA-2 knockout mice indicate that this protein is required in hematopoiesis (2). GATA-2 also inhibits the differentiation of white (3) and brown adipocytes (4) and has been shown to suppress the proliferation of neuronal progenitor cells (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant of the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The jumonji domain-containing protein 2 (JMJD2) family, also known as the JmjC domain-containing histone demethylation protein 3 (JHDM3) family, contains four members: JMJD2A/JHDM3A, JMJD2B/JHDM3B, JMJD2C/JHDM3C, and JMJD2D/JHDM3D. In addition to the JmjC domain, these proteins also contain JmjN, PHD, and tudor domains, the latter of which has been shown to bind to methylated histone H3 at Lys4 and Lys9, and methylated histone H4 at Lys20 (4,5). JMJD2 proteins have been shown to demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and Lys36 and function as both activators and repressors of transcription (6-11). JMJD2A, JMJD2C, and JMJD2D function as coactivators of the androgen receptor in prostate tumor cells (7). In contrast, JMJD2A also associates with Rb and NCoR corepressor complexes and is necessary for transcriptional repression of target genes (8,9). JMJD2B antagonizes histone H3 Lys9 tri-methylation at pericentric heterochromatin (10). JMJD2C, also known as GASC1, is amplified in squamous cell carcinomas and metastatic lung carcinoma and inhibition of JMJD2C expression decreases cell proliferation (11,12). JMJD2C has also been identified as a downstream target of Oct-4 and is critical for the regulation of self-renewal in embryonic stem cells (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondrial acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) plays a pivotal role in ketogenesis and branched chain amino acid metabolism (1-3). Research studies have demonstrated that ACAT1 also plays a key role in carbohydrate metabolism of tumor cells by directly acetylating and inhibiting the activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) and PDH phosphatase, which leads to decreased carbon flux through PDH and increased glycolysis (4,5). Mechanistically, it has been shown that numerous oncogenic tyrosine kinases directly phosphorylate ACAT1 at Y407, which promotes tetramerization and stabilization of the active enzyme in order to drive glycolysis and tumor growth (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH) is one of three enzymes in the α ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDC) that is responsible for catalyzing a rate-regulating step of the tricarboxylic acid (Krebs) cycle. Together with dihydrolipoamide S-succinyltransferase (DLST) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD), OGDH helps to convert 2-oxoglutarate to succinyl-CoA and CO2 within eukaryotic mitochondria (1). Regulation of this enzyme complex is important for mitochondrial energy metabolism within cells (2). Research studies indicate that OGDH activity within the mitochondrial matrix is regulated by multiple factors, including calcium, the adenine nucleotides ATP and ADP, and NADH (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT2, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, deacetylates α-tubulin at Lys40 and histone H4 at Lys16 and has been implicated in cytoskeletal regulation and progression through mitosis (2,3). SirT2 protein is mainly cytoplasmic and is associated with microtubules and HDAC6, another tubulin deacetylase (2). Deacetylation of α-tubulin decreases its stability and may be required for proper regulation of cell shape, intracellular transport, cell motility, and cell division (2,4). The abundance and phosphorylation state of SirT2 increase at the G2/M transition of the cell cycle, and SirT2 relocalizes to chromatin during mitosis when histone H4 Lys16 acetylation levels decrease (3,5). Overexpression of SirT2 prolongs mitosis, while overexpression of the CDC14B phosphatase results in both decreased phosphorylation and abundance of SirT2, allowing for proper mitotic exit (5). Thus, the deacetylation of both histone H4 and α-tubulin by SirT2 may be critical for proper chromatin and cytoskeletal dynamics required for completion of mitosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CrkL, a 39 kDa adaptor protein, has a key regulatory role in hematopoietic cells. CrkL has one SH2 and two SH3 domains, with 60% homology to CrkII (1). The amino-terminal SH3 domain of CrkL binds proteins such as C3G, SOS, PI3K, c-Abl and BCR/Abl. The SH2 domain of CrkL can bind to tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins such as Cbl, HEF1, CAS and paxillin (2,3). CrkL is involved in various signaling cascades initiated by different cytokines and growth factors. The biological outcomes of the Crk-activated signal transduction include the modulation of cell adhesion, cell migration and immune cell responses (4). CrkL is a prominent substrate of the BCR/Abl oncoprotein in chronic myelogenous leukemia and binds to both BCR/Abl and c-Abl (5). CrkL is prominently and constitutively tyrosine phosphorylated in CML neutrophils and is not phosphorylated in normal neutrophils. Moreover, stimulation of normal neutrophils with cytokines and agonists does not induce tyrosine phosphorylation of this protein (6), indicating that it may be a useful target for therapeutic intervention or as a disease marker. Tyr207 in CrkL is the BCR/Abl phosphorylation site (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces. Tight junctions are composed of claudin and occludin proteins, which join the junctions to the cytoskeleton (1,2). The claudin family is composed of 23 integral membrane proteins, and their expression, which varies among tissue types, may determine both the strength and properties of the epithelial barrier. Alteration in claudin protein expression pattern is associated with several types of cancer (2,3). Claudin-1 is expressed primarily in keratinocytes (4) and normal mammary epithelial cells, but is absent or reduced in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MTHFD2 is a bifunctional methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase/cyclohydrolase involved in mitochondrial folate metabolism (1). MTHFD2 expression is developmentally regulated, as it is expressed in embryos but not in most adult tissues. Recent research studies have shown that MTHFD2 is consistently overexpressed in many cancer types and correlated with poor survival in breast cancer (2-5). Overexpression of MTHFD2 promotes cell proliferation while its depletion induces cell death in human cancer cells (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Striatal enriched phosphatase (STEP, also known as PTPN5), is a protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed in dopaminoceptive neurons of the central nervous system (1). Alternative splicing produces the cytosolic STEP46 and the membrane-associated STEP61 isoforms of STEP. Dopamine activates D1 receptors and PKA, which in turn phosphorylate both isoforms of STEP. Phosphorylation of STEP61 occurs at Ser160 and Ser221, while STEP46 is phosphorylated at Ser49 (equivalent to Ser221 of STEP61) (2). NMDA-mediated activation of STEP is an important mechanism for regulation of Erk activity in neurons (3). Furthermore, STEP is involved in the regulation of both NMDAR and AMPAR trafficking (4,5). Due to its importance in cognitive function, STEP may play a role in Alzheimer's disease (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RING-box protein 1 (RBX1 or ROC1) is an essential component of two distinct but structurally related E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes, the SCF complex and the CBC (VHL) complex (1). RBX1 mediates the neddylation of CUL1, which activates SCF E3 ligase by facilitating the ubiquitin transfer from E2 to substrates (2-4). The RING finger domain of RBX1 is required for ubiquitin ligation (5). Two evolutionarily conserved mammalian RBX family members, RBX1/ROC1 and RBX2/ROC2/SAG, have been identified (5). RBX1 is constitutively expressed and binds to CUL2/VHL, while stress-inducible RBX2 binds to CUL5/SOCS (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein 2 (PHF2) is a putative transcription factor. PHF2 contains a zinc finger-like PHD domain that is distinct from other classes of zinc finger motifs and is often found in proteins that influence chromatin structure (1). It also contains a Jumonji C (JmjC) domain, which may play a role in histone demethylation (2). The PHF2 gene is ubiquitously expressed in adult mouse tissues; however, the majority of PHF2 expression in the mouse embryo occurs in the neural tube and root ganglia (1). PHF2 mutations have been associated with both early- and late-onset breast carcinoma (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The mTORC1 kinase complex is a critical regulator of cell growth (1,2). Its activity is modulated by energy levels, growth factors, and amino acids via signaling through Akt, MAPK, and AMPK pathways (3,4). Recent studies found that the four related GTPases, RagA, RagB, RagC, and RagD, interact with raptor within the mTORC1 complex (1,2). These interactions are both necessary and sufficient for mTORC1 activation in response to amino acid signals (1,2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Adherens junctions are dynamic structures that form cell-cell contacts and are important in development, differentiation, tissue integrity, morphology and cell polarity. They are composed of the transmembrane proteins, cadherins, which bind cadherins on adjacent cells in a calcium-dependent manner. On the cytoplasmic side of adherens junctions, the classic model states that cadherins are linked to the cytoskeleton through β- and α-catenin. α-E-catenin is ubiquitously expressed, α-N-catenin is expressed in neuronal tissue, and α-T-catenin is primarily expressed in heart tissue. Research studies have demonstrated that loss of E-cadherin and α-E-catenin occurs during the progression of several human cancers, indicating that the breakdown of adherens junctions is important in cancer progression (reviewed in 1).Research studies also suggest that, rather than acting as a static link between cadherins and actin, α-catenin regulates actin dynamics directly, possibly by competing with the actin nucleating arp2/3 complex (2,3). α-catenin also plays a role in regulating β-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity, affecting differentiation and response to Wnt signaling. α-catenin binds to β-catenin in the nucleus, preventing it from regulating transcription, and levels of both proteins appear to be regulated via proteasome-dependent degradation (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Secretory proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) after their synthesis where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. To reach their native conformation, many secretory proteins require the formation of intra- or inter-molecular disulfide bonds (1). This process is called oxidative protein folding. Several oxidoreductases of the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family essential for disulfide formation and isomerization are localized to the ER (2). Studies have found that the ER-residing protein endoplasmic oxidoreductin-1 (Ero1) provides the oxidizing potential to the ER in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (3). In vitro experiments demonstrated that Ero1 is oxidized by molecular oxygen in a FAD-dependent manner and the oxidized Ero1 in turn serves as an oxidant for PDI (4). Two human homologs of Ero1, Ero1-like (Ero1-Lα and β) have been identified (2,5). Ero1-Lα is an ER membrane-associated N-glycoprotein that promotes oxidative protein folding and has been shown to be expressed in several cell lines and tissues (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin H belongs to a conserved cyclin family that plays a critical role in the regulation of cell cycle dependent kinases (CDKs) necessary for cell cycle progression (1,2). In general, the activity of CDKs requires the binding of appropriate cyclins as well as phosphorylation driven by Cdk-activating kinase (CAK). Cyclin H is part of the CAK complex that includes the kinase CDK7, and an assembly factor p36/Mat1, which enhances binding between cyclin H and CDK7 and increases activity (3,4). CAK regulates progression through the cell cycle by activating cdc2, CDK2, and CDK4 kinases through phosphorylation of a critical threonine residue in the T-loop of the CDK-cyclin complexes (5,6). The CAK complex can exist either in its free form or in association with transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) which can affect its substrate specificity (7,8,9). When bound to TFIIH, CAK preferentially phosphorylates the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (9), providing a link between cell cycle control, transcriptional regulation, and DNA repair.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

Each control slide contains formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded KYSE 450 cells, both untreated and treated with EGF, that serve as a control for Phospho-EGFR immunostaining. Western blot analysis was performed on extracts derived from the same cells to verify the efficacy of the EGF treatment.To be used with antibodies: 2235, 2237, 3777, 2236, 2234, 4404, 4407, 4267, 9411, 9417, 9416.

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

The PAK antibody sampler kit provides and economical means to evaluate the activation status of PAK1, 2, and 3. This kit includes enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blots with each antibody.
The Procaspase Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the abundance and activation of caspases. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform at least two western blots per primary antibody.
$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Total p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2). A p44/42 MAPK mouse mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, p44/42 MAPK is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a p44/42 MAPK rabbit detection mAb is added to detect the captured p44/42 MAPK protein. Anti-Rabbit IgG, HRP-linked antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of total p44/42 MAPK.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Background: Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a widely conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in many cellular programs, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, and death. The p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) signaling pathway can be activated in response to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli including mitogens, growth factors, and cytokines (1-3), and research investigators consider it an important target in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer (4). Upon stimulation, a sequential three-part protein kinase cascade is initiated, consisting of a MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK or MAP3K), a MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK or MAP2K), and a MAP kinase (MAPK). Multiple p44/42 MAP3Ks have been identified, including members of the Raf family, as well as Mos and Tpl2/COT. MEK1 and MEK2 are the primary MAPKKs in this pathway (5,6). MEK1 and MEK2 activate p44 and p42 through phosphorylation of activation loop residues Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr185/Tyr187, respectively. Several downstream targets of p44/42 have been identified, including p90RSK (7) and the transcription factor Elk-1 (8,9). p44/42 are negatively regulated by a family of dual-specificity (Thr/Tyr) MAPK phosphatases, known as DUSPs or MKPs (10), along with MEK inhibitors, such as U0126 and PD98059.