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Product listing: Di-Methyl-Histone H3 Antibody Sampler Kit #9847 to Pim-1 Antibody, UniProt ID P11309 #2907

The Di-Methyl-Histone H3 Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means of evaluating methylation sites on histone H3. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blots.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in Mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated NRF2 (D1Z9C) XP® Rabbit mAb #12721.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The nuclear factor-like 2 (NRF2) transcriptional activator binds antioxidant response elements (ARE) of target gene promoter regions to regulate expression of oxidative stress response genes. Under basal conditions, the NRF2 inhibitor INrf2 (also called KEAP1) binds and retains NRF2 in the cytoplasm where it can be targeted for ubiquitin-mediated degradation (1). Small amounts of constitutive nuclear NRF2 maintain cellular homeostasis through regulation of basal expression of antioxidant response genes. Following oxidative or electrophilic stress, KEAP1 releases NRF2, thereby allowing the activator to translocate to the nucleus and bind to ARE-containing genes (2). The coordinated action of NRF2 and other transcription factors mediates the response to oxidative stress (3). Altered expression of NRF2 is associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (4). NRF2 activity in lung cancer cell lines directly correlates with cell proliferation rates, and inhibition of NRF2 expression by siRNA enhances anti-cancer drug-induced apoptosis (5).

The Rpb1 CTD Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating total Rpb1 NTD levels as well as Rpb1 CTD phosphorylated and specific sites. The kit includes enough primary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.

Background: RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is a large multi-protein complex that functions as a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, catalyzing the transcription of DNA into RNA using the four ribonucleoside triphosphates as substrates (1). The largest subunit, RNAPII subunit B1 (Rpb1), also known as RNAPII subunit A (POLR2A), contains a unique heptapeptide sequence (Tyr1,Ser2,Pro3,Thr4,Ser5,Pro6,Ser7), which is repeated up to 52 times in the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein (1). This CTD heptapeptide repeat is subject to multiple post-translational modifications, which dictate the functional state of the polymerase complex. Phosphorylation of the CTD during the active transcription cycle integrates transcription with chromatin remodeling and nascent RNA processing by regulating the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes and RNA processing proteins to the transcribed gene (1). During transcription initiation, RNAPII contains a hypophosphorylated CTD and is recruited to gene promoters through interactions with DNA-bound transcription factors and the Mediator complex (1). The escape of RNAPII from gene promoters requires phosphorylation at Ser5 by CDK7, the catalytic subunit of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) (2). Phosphorylation at Ser5 mediates the recruitment of RNA capping enzymes, in addition to histone H3 Lys4 methyltransferases, which function to regulate transcription initiation and chromatin structure (3,4). After promoter escape, RNAPII proceeds down the gene to an intrinsic pause site, where it is halted by the negative elongation factors NELF and DSIF (5). At this point, RNAPII is unstable and frequently aborts transcription and dissociates from the gene. Productive transcription elongation requires phosphorylation at Ser2 by CDK9, the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor P-TEFb (6). Phosphorylation at Ser2 creates a stable transcription elongation complex and facilitates recruitment of RNA splicing and polyadenylation factors, in addition to histone H3 Lys36 methyltransferases, which function to promote elongation-compatible chromatin (7,8). Ser2/Ser5-phosphorylated RNAPII then transcribes the entire length of the gene to the 3' end, where transcription is terminated. RNAPII dissociates from the DNA and is recycled to the hypophosphorylated form by various CTD phosphatases (1).In addition to Ser2/Ser5 phosphorylation, Ser7 of the CTD heptapeptide repeat is also phosphorylated during the active transcription cycle. Phosphorylation at Ser7 is required for efficient transcription of small nuclear (sn) RNA genes (9,10). snRNA genes, which are neither spliced nor poly-adenylated, are structurally different from protein-coding genes. Instead of a poly(A) signal found in protein-coding RNAs, snRNAs contain a conserved 3'-box RNA processing element, which is recognized by the Integrator snRNA 3' end processing complex (11,12). Phosphorylation at Ser7 by CDK7 during the early stages of transcription facilitates recruitment of RPAP2, which dephosphorylates Ser5, creating a dual Ser2/Ser7 phosphorylation mark that facilitates recruitment of the Integrator complex and efficient processing of nascent snRNA transcripts (13-15).

PLCγ Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of analyzing phospho and total PLCγ levels. PLCγ Antibody Sampler Kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each antibody.

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ, and PLCε. Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulate the activity of PLC. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (2). PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783, and 1248 (3). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (4). PLCγ2 is engaged in antigen-dependent signaling in B cells and collagen-dependent signaling in platelets. Phosphorylation by Btk or Lck at Tyr753, 759, 1197, and 1217 is correlated with PLCγ2 activity (5,6).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EGF Receptor (D38B1) XP® Rabbit mAb #4267.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-PLCγ1 (Tyr783) (D6M9S) Rabbit mAb #14008.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ, and PLCε. Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulate the activity of PLC. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (2). PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783, and 1248 (3). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (4). PLCγ2 is engaged in antigen-dependent signaling in B cells and collagen-dependent signaling in platelets. Phosphorylation by Btk or Lck at Tyr753, 759, 1197, and 1217 is correlated with PLCγ2 activity (5,6).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Rb (Ser807/811) (D20B12) XP® Rabbit mAb #8516.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein Rb regulates cell proliferation by controlling progression through the restriction point within the G1-phase of the cell cycle (1). Rb has three functionally distinct binding domains and interacts with critical regulatory proteins including the E2F family of transcription factors, c-Abl tyrosine kinase, and proteins with a conserved LXCXE motif (2-4). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation by a CDK inhibits Rb target binding and allows cell cycle progression (5). Rb inactivation and subsequent cell cycle progression likely requires an initial phosphorylation by cyclin D-CDK4/6 followed by cyclin E-CDK2 phosphorylation (6). Specificity of different CDK/cyclin complexes has been observed in vitro (6-8) and cyclin D1 is required for Ser780 phosphorylation in vivo (9).

Phospho-Syk Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate the activation status of Syk, including the phosphorylation of Tyr323, Tyr352 and Tyr525/526. The control Syk Antibody is also included. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies for two Western blot experiments.

Background: Syk is a protein tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in intracellular signal transduction in hematopoietic cells (1-3). Syk interacts with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) located in the cytoplasmic domains of immune receptors (4). It couples the activated immunoreceptors to downstream signaling events that mediate diverse cellular responses, including proliferation, differentiation, and phagocytosis (4). There is also evidence of a role for Syk in nonimmune cells and investigators have indicated that Syk is a potential tumor suppressor in human breast carcinomas (5). Tyr323 is a negative regulatory phosphorylation site within the SH2-kinase linker region in Syk. Phosphorylation at Tyr323 provides a direct binding site for the TKB domain of Cbl (6,7). Tyr352 of Syk is involved in the association of PLCγ1 (8). Tyr525 and Tyr526 are located in the activation loop of the Syk kinase domain; phosphorylation at Tyr525/526 of human Syk (equivalent to Tyr519/520 of mouse Syk) is essential for Syk function (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nur77, also known as TR3 and NGFI-B, is an immediate-early response gene and an orphan member of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid receptor superfamily (1-3). Nur77 is composed of an amino-terminal transactivation domain, a central DNA-binding domain and a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain. Expression of Nur77 is rapidly induced by a variety of stimuli, including apoptotic, mitogenic and stress signals (1-6). It has been proposed to have many functions related to cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Nur77 has been extensively studied in T cells where it has been implicated in the process of negative selection and TCR-mediated apoptosis (5,6). Nur77 binds to specific DNA elements leading to the regulation of target genes (7). As a possible mechanism for regulating apoptosis, Nur77 can induce the expression of apoptotic genes such as FasL and TRAIL (8,9). Nur77 is heavily phosphorylated by multiple kinases, which may affect its transactivation activity as well as its subcellular localization (4,10,11). Translocation of Nur77 from the nucleus to the mitochondria can regulate its association with Bcl-2 and control the release of cytochrome c, thereby triggering apoptosis (12,13).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis of human cells. The unconjugated Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (193H12) Rabbit mAb #4058 reacts with Phospho-Akt (Ser473) from human, mouse and rat. CST expects that Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (193H12) Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate) will also recognize Phospho-Akt (Ser473) in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Stat6 (Tyr641) (D8S9Y) Rabbit mAb #56554.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Upon activation by Janus kinases, Stat6 translocates to the nucleus where it regulates cytokine-induced gene expression. Stat6 is activated via phosphorylation at Tyr641 and is required for responsiveness to IL-4 and IL-13 (1-4). In addition, Stat6 is activated by IFN-α in B cells, where it forms transcriptionally active complexes with Stat2 and p48 (5,6). Protein phosphatase 2A is also involved in regulation of IL-4-mediated Stat6 signaling (7).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1, Hpr6.6) was originally identified as a component of a progesterone-binding protein complex that also contains plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 RNA binding protein (PAIRBP1, SERBP1) (1,2). The structure of PGRMC1 protein includes a single transmembrane region and a carboxy-terminal cytochrome b5 heme-binding domain (3,4). Research studies confirm that PGRMC1 binds heme as well as binding and regulating cytochrome P450 enzymes responsible for the metabolism of clinical drugs and endogenous signaling molecules (5-7). While early research studies were equivocal on the ability of PGRMC1 to bind progesterone, studies using PGRMC1-fusion proteins clearly demonstrate that PGRMC1 binds progesterone with high affinity (2,8). Studies detailing expression of PGRMC1 in granulosa cells suggest that PGRMC1 mediates the anti-apoptotic actions of progesterone and that this protein is part of a signal transduction pathway that regulates granulosa cell function (9).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Cleaved Caspase-3 (Asp175) (D3E9) Rabbit mAb #9579.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Caspase-3 (CPP-32, Apoptain, Yama, SCA-1) is a critical executioner of apoptosis, as it is either partially or totally responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many key proteins, such as the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) (1). Activation of caspase-3 requires proteolytic processing of its inactive zymogen into activated p17 and p12 fragments. Cleavage of caspase-3 requires the aspartic acid residue at the P1 position (2).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated α-Tubulin (DM1A) Mouse mAb #3873.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Btk/Tec family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases. Like other Btk family members, it contains a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and Src homology SH3 and SH2 domains. Btk plays an important role in B cell development (1,2). Activation of B cells by various ligands is accompanied by Btk membrane translocation mediated by its PH domain binding to phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (3-5). The membrane-localized Btk is active and associated with transient phosphorylation of two tyrosine residues, Tyr551 and Tyr223. Tyr551 in the activation loop is transphosphorylated by the Src family tyrosine kinases, leading to autophosphorylation at Tyr223 within the SH3 domain, which is necessary for full activation (6,7). The activation of Btk is negatively regulated by PKCβ through phosphorylation of Btk at Ser180, which results in reduced membrane recruitment, transphosphorylation, and subsequent activation (8). The PKC inhibitory signal is likely to be a key determinant of the B cell receptor signaling threshold to maintain optimal Btk activity (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C-Kinase Substrate (MARCKS) is a major PKC substrate expressed in many cell types. MARCKS has been implicated in cell motility, cell adhesion, phagocytosis, membrane traffic, and mitogenesis (1). PKC phosphorylates Ser159, 163, 167, and 170 of MARCKS in response to growth factors and oxidative stress. Phosphorylation at these sites regulates the calcium/calmodulin binding and filamentous (F)-actin cross-linking activities of MARCKS (2-4). Phosphorylation by PKC also results in translocation of MARCKS from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm (5).

$305
50 assays
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated NY-ESO-1 (D1Q2U) Rabbit mAb #45437.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are a family of more than 100 proteins whose normal expression is largely restricted to immune privileged germ cells of the testis, ovary, and trophoblast cells of the placenta. Although most normal somatic tissues are void of CTA expression, due to epigenetic silencing of gene expression, their expression is upregulated in a wide variety of human solid and liquid tumors (1,2). As such, CTAs have garnered much attention as attractive targets for a variety of immunotherapy-based approaches to selectively attack tumors (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but is also associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and is directed by a number of autophagy-related (Atg) genes. These proteins are involved in the formation of autophagosomes, cytoplasmic vacuoles that are delivered to lysosomes for degradation. The class III type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34 regulates vacuolar trafficking and autophagy (4,5). Multiple proteins associate with Vsp34, including p105/Vsp15, Beclin-1, UVRAG, Atg14, and Rubicon, to determine Vsp34 function (6-12). Atg14 and Rubicon were identified based on their ability to bind to Beclin-1 and participate in unique complexes with opposing functions (9-12). Rubicon, which localizes to the endosome and lysosome, inhibits Vps34 lipid kinase activity; knockdown of Rubicon enhances autophagy and endocytic trafficking (11,12). In contrast, Atg14 localizes to autophagosomes, isolation membranes and ER, and can enhance Vps34 activity. Knockdown of Atg14 inhibits starvation-induced autophagy (11,12).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The WNK [with no lysine (K)] family of serine/threonine kinases is characterized by having a cysteine in place of lysine in subdomain II of its kinase activation domain (1,2). The lysine necessary for phosphoryl transfer is located in an atypical position in the catalytic domain. Four WNK family members have been identified in humans (WNK1-4) and have been implicated in regulating ion permeability (3). Mutations in the WNK1 and WNK4 genes in humans cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII), an autosomal dominant disorder leading to hypertension, hyperkalemia, and renal tubular acidosis (4). WNK4 is specifically expressed in the kidney, whereas WNK1 has a wider distribution but is predominantly expressed in polarized epithelia (1-3). Heterozygous mutations in WNK1 in mice result in a significant decrease in blood pressure, while homozygous mutations are embryonic lethal (5). WNK1 is phosphorylated by Akt at Thr60 (6). In addition, WNK1 may be autophosphorylated at Ser382 in the activation loop, and this is thought to be required for its kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: SPAK (STE20/SPS1-related Pro/Ala-rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress responsive 1) are members of the GCK family serine/threonine kinases. Overexpression and in vitro studies demonstrate that SPAK is able to activate p38 MAP kinase indicating a possible role for SPAK in the stress response (1). Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that SPAK and OSR1 bind to Na-K-2Cl cotransporters NKCC1 and NKCC2 and K-Cl cotransporter KCC3 (2). WNK1 and WNK4 phosphorylate SPAK at Thr243/247 and Ser380 (3-5). Similarly, WNK1 and WNK4 phosphorylate OSR1 at Thr185 and Ser315 (3,4). Phosphorylation at these sites stimulates SPAK and OSR1 activity, leading to NKCC1 phosphorylation and enhanced NKCC1 activity (3-5). SPAK is also phosphorylated at Ser311 by PKCθ in response to T cell activation. Substitution of Ser311 with Ala or specific siRNA knock-down of SPAK dramatically reduces TCR/CD28-induced AP-1 activation, suggesting SPAK is involved in T cell signaling as well (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is a family of heterochromatic adaptor molecules involved in both gene silencing and higher order chromatin structure (1). All three HP1 family members (α, β, and γ) are primarily associated with centromeric heterochromatin; however, HP1β and γ also localize to euchromatic sites in the genome (2,3). HP1 proteins are approximately 25 kDa in size and contain a conserved amino-terminal chromodomain, followed by a variable hinge region and a conserved carboxy-terminal chromoshadow domain. The chromodomain facilitates binding to histone H3 tri-methylated at Lys9, a histone "mark" closely associated with centromeric heterochromatin (4,5). The variable hinge region binds both RNA and DNA in a sequence-independent manner (6). The chromoshadow domain mediates the dimerization of HP1 proteins, in addition to binding multiple proteins implicated in gene silencing and heterochromatin formation, including the SUV39H histone methyltransferase, the DNMT1 and DNMT3a DNA methyltransferases, and the p150 subunit of chromatin-assembly factor-1 (CAF1) (7-9). In addition to contributing to heterochromatin formation and propagation, HP1 and SUV39H are also found complexed with retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F6 proteins, both of which function to repress euchromatic gene transcription in quiescent cells (10,11). HP1 proteins are subject to multiple types of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, suggesting multiple means of regulation (12-14).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Basigin (EMMPRIN, CD147) is a type I integral membrane receptor protein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (1). Basigin is a glycosylated protein with four known isoforms, of which isoform 2 is the most abundantly expressed (2). Multiple functions have been ascribed to Basigin; foremost among these is stimulating the secretion of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases by adjacent fibroblasts, a function which has been implicated in promoting tumor progression (2-4). Research studies have shown that Basigin is overexpressed by many tumor cells, and its expression level may correlate with tumor malignancy (5,6). A recent study identified the BASIGIN gene as a regulatory target of Slug, suggesting a role for Basigin in the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (7). Basigin has also been identified as a marker for a subset of highly suppressive regulatory T cells (8), and as an obligate receptor for the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum on human erythrocytes (9).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between nonidentical DNA sequences, and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins, and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2). Mutations in MSH6 and other MMR proteins have been found in a large proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations in MSH6 have been shown to occur in glioblastoma in response to temozolomide therapy and to promote temozolomide resistance (4).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: c-Myb is a transcriptional activator that specifically recognizes the sequence 5'-YAAC[GT]G-3'. It is expressed in hematopoietic progenitor cells where it plays an important role in the control of proliferation and differentiation (1-3). c-Myb is required for transcription of genes involved in self-renewal of intestinal stem cells. Importantly, c-Myb regulates expression of Lgr5, a protein expressed in putative intestinal stem cells that give rise to all cell lineages of small intestinal crypts (4). c-Myb is reported to be expressed in colon crypt cells and in human colorectal cancer lines (5,6). Research has shown that c-Myb gene translocations and copy number alterations are found in several leukemias, breast cancer, and other solid tumors (7,8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is an aggressive brainstem astrocyte tumor arising mostly in children, leading to a long-term survival rate of less than 10%. Multiple whole-genome sequencing studies of DIPG patients identified commonly occurring mutations in the H3F3A gene encoding histone H3.3. One of these mutations, a lysine to methionine amino acid substitution (K27M), is found in up to 78% of DIPGs and 22% of non-brainstem pediatric gliomas (1-3). This mutation is associated with poor prognosis, with a mean survival time of 0.73 years for patients with the K27M mutation versus 4.6 years for patients without the mutation (1-3). Expression of the K27M mutant histone H3 is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the levels of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated trimethylation of histone H3, changes in the distribution of PRC2 on the genome, and altered expression of genes associated with various cancer pathways (4-6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA damage, if not repaired, can lead to genome instability and tumorigenesis. Eukaryotic cells use multiple (sometimes overlapping) signaling pathways to respond to agents that cause various types of DNA lesions. Downstream molecules in DNA repair pathways converge on the sites of DNA damage, resulting in cell cycle arrest and repair or apoptosis (1). Rad18 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase recruited to sites of DNA damage. Along with the E2 ubiquitin ligase Rad6, Rad18 is responsible for monoubiquitination of DNA damage proteins including the replication clamp PCNA and the Fanconi anemia core protein FANCD2. Monoubiquitination of these proteins signals to downstream effector molecules and results in the repair of either post-replication repair lesions via the translesion synthesis (TLS) pathway or DNA double strand breaks via homologous recombination (2-4). Phospho-proteomic studies indicate that Ser403 of Rad18 may be phosphorylated by ATM/ATR in response to DNA damage-inducing agents (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Set1 histone methyltransferase protein was first identified in yeast as part of the Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complex, which methylates histone H3 at Lys4 and functions as a transcriptional co-activator (1). While yeast contain only one known Set1 protein, six Set1-related proteins exist in mammals: SET1A, SET1B, MLL1, MLL2, MLL3, and MLL4, all of which assemble into COMPASS-like complexes and methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (2,3). These Set1-related proteins are each found in distinct protein complexes, all of which share the common subunits WDR5, RBBP5, ASH2L, CXXC1 and DPY30. These subunits are required for proper complex assembly and modulation of histone methyltransferase activity (2-6). MLL1 and MLL2 complexes contain the additional protein subunit, menin (6). Like yeast Set1, all six Set1-related mammalian proteins methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (2-6). MLL translocations are found in a large number of hematological malignancies, suggesting that Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complexes play a critical role in leukemogenesis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Pim proteins (Pim-1, Pim-2 and Pim-3) are oncogene-encoded serine/threonine kinases (1). Pim-1, a serine/threonine kinase highly expressed in hematopoietic cells, plays a critical role in the transduction of mitogenic signals and is rapidly induced by a variety of growth factors and cytokines (1-4). Pim-1 cooperates with c-Myc in lymphoid cell transformation and protects cells from growth factor withdrawal and genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis (5,6). Pim-1 also enhances the transcriptional activity of c-Myb through direct phosphorylation within the c-Myb DNA binding domain as well as phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivator p100 (7,8). Hypermutations of the Pim-1 gene are found in B-cell diffuse large cell lymphomas (9). Phosphorylation of Pim-1 at Tyr218 by Etk occurs following IL-6 stimulation and correlates with an increase in Pim-1 activity (10). Various Pim substrates have been identified; Bad is phosphorylated by both Pim-1 and Pim-2 at Ser112 and this phosphorylation reverses Bad-induced cell apoptosis (11,12).