Interested in promotions? | Click here >>

Product listing: Phospho-RelB (Ser552) (D41B9) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q01201 #5025 to Phospho-Rb (Ser608) (D10F2) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P06400 #8147

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The Ikaros family of zinc-finger DNA-binding proteins belongs to the Kruppel transcription factor superfamily. Ikaros proteins are characterized by the presence of an amino-terminal zinc finger DNA-binding domain and a carboxy-terminal dimerization domain. Members of the Ikaros family include Ikaros, Aiolos, Helios, EOS, and Pegasus (1). All family members can form homodimers and heterodimers with other members of the Ikaros family. Most also contain multiple isoforms that are generated as a result of differential splicing, with some isoforms behaving in a dominant negative manner upon dimerization (2).Ikaros (IKZF1, LYF1) is the prototypical Ikaros family zinc-finger transcription factor and is expressed abundantly in lymphoid cells. Genetic studies in mice demonstrate that Ikaros is a tumor suppressor that is important for the normal development of B, T, natural killer, and dendritic cells (3,4). Additional studies show that imbalanced expression of different Ikaros isoforms, as well as mutations in the corresponding IKAROS gene, can be associated with a number of hematologic malignancies in humans (2,5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Atg101 was discovered as a binding protein for Atg13, a component of the ULK1 serine-threonine kinase complex required for autophagy (1-3). Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (4,5). It is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation, but is also associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (6). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and is directed by a number of autophagy-related (Atg) genes. The ULK1 complex includes both Atg13 and FIP200 and is required for starvation-induced autophagy (7-9). Interaction between Atg101 and Atg13 can be important for the stability and basal phosphorylation of Atg13 and ULK1 (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) family proteins exist as several disulphide-bonded, dimeric isoforms (PDGF AA, PDGF AB, PDGF BB, PDGF CC, and PDGF DD) that bind in a specific pattern to two closely related receptor tyrosine kinases, PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα) and PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ). PDGFRα and PDGFRβ share 75% to 85% sequence homology between their two intracellular kinase domains, while the kinase insert and carboxy-terminal tail regions display a lower level (27% to 28%) of homology (1). PDGFRα homodimers bind all PDGF isoforms except those containing PDGF D. PDGFRβ homodimers bind PDGF BB and DD isoforms, as well as the PDGF AB heterodimer. The heteromeric PDGF receptor α/β binds PDGF B, C, and D homodimers, as well as the PDGF AB heterodimer (2). PDGFRα and PDGFRβ can each form heterodimers with EGFR, which is also activated by PDGF (3). Various cells differ in the total number of receptors present and in the receptor subunit composition, which may account for responsive differences among cell types to PDGF binding (4). Ligand binding induces receptor dimerization and autophosphorylation, followed by binding and activation of cytoplasmic SH2 domain-containing signal transduction molecules, such as GRB2, Src, GAP, PI3 kinase, PLCγ, and NCK. A number of different signaling pathways are initiated by activated PDGF receptors and lead to control of cell growth, actin reorganization, migration, and differentiation (5). Tyr751 in the kinase-insert region of PDGFRβ is the docking site for PI3 kinase (6). Phosphorylated pentapeptides derived from Tyr751 of PDGFRβ (pTyr751-Val-Pro-Met-Leu) inhibit the association of the carboxy-terminal SH2 domain of the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase with PDGFRβ (7). Tyr740 is also required for PDGFRβ-mediated PI3 kinase activation (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D (PLD) hydrolyzes phosphatidylcholine (PC) to produce choline and phosphatidic acid (PA). PA is the precursor of the second messenger, diacylglycerol (DAG). Two isoforms of PLD (PLD1 and PLD2) have been identified so far. Both are regulated by protein kinases, small GTPases and Ca2+ (1). PLD1 is phosphorylated at Ser2, Ser561, and Thr147 by PKC (2,3). Phosphorylation at Thr147 and Ser561 regulates PLD1 activity (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Thymidine kinases play a critical role in generating the DNA synthetic precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) by catalyzing the phosphotransfer of phosphate from ATP to deoxythymidine (dT) and thymidine (T) in the cell. There are two known thymidine kinases, cytoplasmic thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) and mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) (1,2). Unlike TK2, which is not modulated by the cell cycle, TK1 expression and activity is regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, accumulating during G1-phase to peak levels in S-phase before being degraded prior to cell division (3,4). Stability, but not activity, may be regulated via phosphorylation of TK1 at Ser13 by Cdc2 and/or Cdk2, but the precise mode of regulation remains elusive (5). These observations indicate that TK1 might be a useful marker of cell proliferation; however, recent studies have shown that TK1 plays a more significant role in the DNA damage response (6). Genotoxic stress promotes increased TK1 expression and kinase activity resulting in reduced cellular apoptosis and enhanced DNA repair efficiency (6). More importantly, numerous studies show that TK1 expression and activity are upregulated during neoplasia and disease progression in humans, and increased serum levels of TK1 correlate with poor prognosis and decreased survival in patients with various types of advanced tumors (7-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MAP kinases are inactivated by dual-specificity protein phosphatases (DUSPs) that differ in their substrate specificity, tissue distribution, inducibility by extracellular stimuli, and cellular localization. DUSPs, also known as MAPK phosphatases (MKP), specifically dephosphorylate both threonine and tyrosine residues in MAPK P-loops and have been shown to play important roles in regulating the function of the MAPK family (1,2). At least 13 members of the family (DUSP1-10, DUSP14, DUSP16, and DUSP22) display unique substrate specificities for various MAP kinases (3). MAPK phosphatases typically contain an amino-terminal rhodanese-fold responsible for DUSP docking to MAPK family members and a carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (4). These phosphatases can play important roles in development, immune system function, stress responses, and metabolic homeostasis (5). In addition, research studies have implicated DUSPs in the development of cancer and the response of cancer cells to chemotherapy (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HSP40 and HSP40-like proteins represent a large family of chaperone proteins that are homologous to E. coli DnaJ protein (1). These proteins are classified into three subtypes based on their structures. The common feature of the family is a conserved J domain, which is usually located at the amino terminus of proteins and responsible for their association with HSP70 (1,2). Human HSP40, also known as Hdj1, belongs to subtype II that contain a unique Gly/Phe-rich region (2). HSP40 family proteins bind unfolded proteins, prevent their aggregation, and then deliver them to HSP70 (2,3). Another major function of HSP40 is to stimulate ATPase activity of HSP70, which causes conformational change of the unfolded proteins (4,5). The HSP40-HSP70-unfolded protein complex further binds to co-chaperones Hip, Hop and HSP90 or components of the protein degradation machinery such as CHIP and BAG-1, which either leads to protein folding or degradation, respectively (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Securin is a regulatory protein that contributes to mitotic checkpoint control, p53 activity, DNA repair, and cell migration. The securin protein prevents premature separation of sister chromatids by inhibiting the protease separase, which cleaves the cohesin complex at the onset of anaphase to allow for sister chromatid segregation (1,2). In mouse oocytes, securin regulates cyclin B stability and G2/M transition (3). Securin negatively affects the transcriptional activity of p53, preventing p53-regulated apoptosis (4). Research studies indicate that securin plays a role in microtubule nucleation, cell polarization, and cell migration (5). Additional research indicates that securin expression may be useful as a biomarker for human breast cancer (6-8). The pituitary tumor-transforming gene 1 (PTTG1) encodes for securin protein, while the highly homologous securin 2 protein is transcribed from the related PTTG2 gene. Securin 2 (PTTG2) protein lacks the ability to inhibit separase activity and may function primarily in cell adhesion and migration (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells is a highly coordinated process that ensures duplication of the genome only once per cell division cycle. Origins of replication are dispersed throughout the genome and their activities are regulated via the sequential binding of pre-replication and replication factors. The origin recognition complex (ORC) is thought to bind to chromatin throughout the cell cycle (1,2). The pre-replication complex (Pre-RC) forms in late mitosis/early G1 phase with the binding of CDT1 and cdc6 to the origin, which allows binding of the heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex. The MCM complex is thought to be the replicative helicase and formation of the Pre-RC is referred to as chromatin licensing. Subsequent initiation of DNA replication requires the activation of the S-phase promoting kinases cdk2 and cdc7. Cdc7 phosphorylates MCM proteins bound to chromatin and, in conjunction with CDT1, recruits the replication factor cdc45 (3-5). Cdc45 is required for formation of pre-initiation complexes at the G1/S transition and for activation of replication origins. The level of cdc45 protein expression is associated with the proliferative status of the cell or tissue. Terminally differentiated and senescent cells lack cdc45 and highly proliferative cell lines express high levels of cdc45 (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), also known as Complex II or succinate:quinone oxidoreductase, is a key component of the citric acid cycle and the electron transport chain (1). Specifically, it is involved in the oxidation of succinate (2). SDH consists of four subunits: SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD (3). Research studies have shown that defects in SDHA cause complex II deficiency (2). In addition, investigators have observed reduction of SDHA in the striatum of patients with Huntington’s disease (3), and reduction of SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD in paragangliomas and phenochromocytomas (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MMP-13 (collagenase 3) belongs to the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) superfamily of enzymes that targets many extracellular proteins, including other proteases, growth factors, cell surface receptors, and adhesion molecules (1, 2). MMP-13 is a member of a subgroup of collagenases (including MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-18) that play an even more important function targeting fibrillar collagen. MMP-13 is synthesized as a latent proenzyme, and proteolytic removal of the inhibitory propeptide domain is required for enzyme activation. MMP-13 protein levels are regulated at the transcriptional level, via specific transcription factors and via promoter DNA methylation (3, 4). MMP-13 preferentially cleaves Type II collagen, and research studies have shown that aberrant upregulation of MMP-13 activity can lead to cartilage loss and osteoarthritis (5, 6). In addition, MMP-13 has been shown to promote cancer development, in part through enhancing tumor angiogenesis and metastases (7-9), suggesting that collagenase activity may serve as a useful marker of tumor progression (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Positive transcription elongation factor (P-TEFb) is a heterodimer composed of cyclin T proteins and CDK9. P-TEFb plays a critical role in the transition of the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) machinery from transcription initiation to elongation (1). At some genes during transcription initiation, RNAPII moves approximately 50 nucleotides away from the transcription start site into the gene where it then pauses and awaits signaling for the formation of a productive transcription elongation complex (1,2). The release of this promoter proximal pausing of RNAPII is signaled by phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) within the largest subunit of RNAPII at Ser2 of the heptapeptide repeat sequence by P-TEFb (3). This phosphorylation event is important for the recruitment of mRNA processing factors and chromatin modifiers that are necessary for proper gene expression (4,5). P-TEFb also promotes transcription elongation by phosphorylating DSIF (DRB-induced stimulating factor) and NELF (negative elongation factor), two negative elongation factors that retain RNAPII at the promoter proximal region of genes to initiate transcription elongation (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Annexin V, also known as PAP-1 or Lipocortin V, is a ~30 kDa protein that binds to phospholipids in a calcium-dependent manner (1). All annexins contain a putative PKC binding site, but only annexin V has been identified as an inhibitor of this pathway (2). It may also signal, by direct interaction with VEGFR2 receptor, in the regulation of vascular endothelial cell proliferation (3). Annexin V preferentially binds phosphatidylserine, in competition with prothrombin, leading to inhibition of blood coagulation at sites of injury preceding contact between lipid components and coagulation factors that initiate thrombosis (4-6). The ability of Annexin V to bind specifically and robustly to phosphatidylserine makes it an attractive reagent in detecting apoptotic cells (7). Annexin V is inducible by glucocorticoids and can be phosphorylated by tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases (8). It is thought to block production of mediators of inflammation, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes by inhibiting the release of arachidonic acid from membranes by phospholipase A2 (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of proteases that target many extracellular proteins including other proteases, growth factors, cell surface receptors, and adhesion molecules (1). Among the family members, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-9 have been characterized as important factors for normal tissue remodeling during embryonic development, wound healing, tumor invasion, angiogenesis, carcinogenesis, and apoptosis (2-4). Research studies have shown that MMP activity correlates with cancer development (2). One mechanism of MMP regulation is transcriptional (5). Once synthesized, MMP exists as a latent proenzyme. Maximum MMP activity requires proteolytic cleavage to generate active MMPs by releasing the inhibitory propeptide domain from the full length protein (5).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Translation repressor protein 4E-BP1 (also known as PHAS-1) inhibits cap-dependent translation by binding to the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 disrupts this interaction and results in activation of cap-dependent translation (1). Both the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway and FRAP/mTOR kinase regulate 4E-BP1 activity (2,3). Multiple 4E-BP1 residues are phosphorylated in vivo (4). While phosphorylation by FRAP/mTOR at Thr37 and Thr46 does not prevent the binding of 4E-BP1 to eIF4E, it is thought to prime 4E-BP1 for subsequent phosphorylation at Ser65 and Thr70 (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Forkhead family of transcription factors is involved in tumorigenesis of rhabdomyosarcoma and acute leukemias (1-3). Within the family, three members (FoxO1, FoxO4, and FoxO3a) have sequence similarity to the nematode orthologue DAF-16, which mediates signaling via a pathway involving IGFR1, PI3K, and Akt (4-6). Active forkhead members act as tumor suppressors by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Increased expression of any FoxO member results in the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p27 Kip1. Forkhead transcription factors also play a part in TGF-β-mediated upregulation of p21 Cip1, a process negatively regulated through PI3K (7). Increased proliferation results when forkhead transcription factors are inactivated through phosphorylation by Akt at Thr24, Ser256, and Ser319, which results in nuclear export and inhibition of transcription factor activity (8). Forkhead transcription factors can also be inhibited by the deacetylase sirtuin (SirT1) (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PAR2 (F2RL1) belongs to the PAR (Protease-activated Receptor) family of G protein-coupled receptors. These membrane receptors are activated through N-terminal cleavage of the receptor by a serine protease such as thrombin, trypsin, or matrix metalloproteinases (1,2). This cleavage exposes the ‘tethered-ligand’ fragment of the receptor, which binds to a second extracellular loop of the receptor and leads to receptor activation. PAR2 is specifically activated by trypsin or trypsin-like proteases. Activated PAR2 stimulates phosphoinositide hydrolysis and calcium mobilization, interacts with β-arrestin, and eventually leads to ERK activation (3). PAR2 expression and activation are mainly associated with inflammatory diseases (3), but may also play a role in cancer development (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Set1 histone methyltransferase protein was first identified in yeast as part of the Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complex, which methylates histone H3 at Lys4 and functions as a transcriptional co-activator (1). While yeast contain only one known Set1 protein, six Set1-related proteins exist in mammals: SET1A, SET1B, MLL1, MLL2, MLL3, and MLL4, all of which assemble into COMPASS-like complexes and methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (2,3). These Set1-related proteins are each found in distinct protein complexes, all of which share the common subunits WDR5, RBBP5, ASH2L, CXXC1 and DPY30. These subunits are required for proper complex assembly and modulation of histone methyltransferase activity (2-6). MLL1 and MLL2 complexes contain the additional protein subunit, menin (6). Like yeast Set1, all six Set1-related mammalian proteins methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (2-6). MLL translocations are found in a large number of hematological malignancies, suggesting that Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complexes play a critical role in leukemogenesis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Enhancer of mRNA decapping 4 (EDC4) was originally identified as the autoantigen Ge-1 from a Sjögren's syndrome patient later diagnosed with primary biliary cirrhosis (1). EDC4 (also known as HEDLS) was later identified as an essential component of cytoplasmic P-bodies responsible for mRNA decapping and degradation (2). Identified EDC4 protein is found as a pair of isoforms generated by alternative splicing and contains several WD domains and a putative nuclear localization signal. EDC4 co-localizes with other P-body decapping proteins such as DCP1A, DCP2 and GW182 (2,3). Experimental evidence suggests that EDC4 may be involved in miRNA-mediated translation repression (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Anoctamin 1, also called TMEM16A for Transmembrane Member 16A, is a plasma membrane calcium-activated chloride channel (1). It is essential for chloride secretion from epithelial tissues (2), and has been shown to be a specific marker for cells of Cajal (3), the pacemaker cells that control smooth muscle contraction. Anoctamin 1 knockout mice exhibit an altered gastric smooth muscle rhythmic contraction (4). More recently, research studies have identified Anoctamin 1 as a heat sensor in nociceptive neurons (5). Heat above 44ºC triggers anoctamin 1-dependent depolarization, contributing to the mediation of thermal nociception (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TRIM25, also termed Estrogen-responsive Finger Protein (EFP), is a member of the tripartite motif-containing (TRIM) family of proteins, characterized by the presence of a RING domain, one or two B-box motifs, and a coiled-coil region (1). TRIM25 was first identified in a search for estrogen-responsive genes (2), and studies have subsequently shown TRIM25 to be overexpressed in many breast cancer tumors (3). A potentially oncogenic role for TRIM25 was suggested by studies showing that suppression of TRIM25 expression inhibited growth of MCF7 cells in vitro and in mouse xenograft models (4). Functional studies largely suggest that TRIM25 functions as a ubiquitin E3 or ISG15 E3 ligase. For example, TRIM25 was shown to induce K63-linked ubiquitination of Rig-I, resulting in Rig-I-mediated activation of downstream signaling cascades that drive the host antiviral innate immune response (5). Notably, it was reported that the influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 inhibits TRIM25-mediated ubiquitination of Rig-I, which may have evolved as a mechanism to evade the host innate immune response (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are large (>500 kDa), intracellular calcium channels found in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum membrane and are responsible for the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores in excitable cells, such as muscle and neurons. RyRs exist as three mammalian isoforms (RyR1-3), all of which form homotetramers regulated by phosphorylation and/or direct or indirect interaction with a variety of proteins (L-type calcium channels, PKA, FKBP12/12.6, CaMKII, calmodulin, calsequestrin, junctin, and triadin) and ions (Mg2+ and Ca2+). Regulation of the RyR channel by protein modulators occurs within the large cytoplasmic domain, whereas the carboxy-terminal portion of the protein forms the ion-binding and conducting pore (1,2). RyR1 and RyR2 are predominantly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle, respectively, where they localize exclusively to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and facilitate calcium-mediated communication between transverse-tubules and sarcoplasmic reticulum. Contraction of skeletal muscle is triggered by release of calcium ions from the SR following depolarization of T-tubules. Research studies have shown that defects in RyR1 are the cause of malignant hyperthermia susceptibility type 1 (MHS1), central core disease of muscle (CCD), multiminicore disease with external ophthalmoplegia, and congenital myopathy with fiber-type disproportion (CFTD), each of which is manifested by defects in muscle function, metabolism, and development (2). Investigators have shown that defects in RyR2 are the cause of familial arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia type 2 (ARVD2) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia type 1 (CPVT1), both of which are implicated in sudden death syndromes as a result of electrical instability and degeneration of the ventricular myocardium or stress-induced ventricular tachycardia (2). Despite low levels of expression in skeletal and smooth muscle, RyR3 is the dominant isoform in neuronal cells (hippocampal neurons, thalamus, Purkinje cells) and has been implicated in synaptic plasticity, dendritic spine remodeling, and spatial memory formation (3). The role of RyR3 in neuronal function has been substantiated by mice lacking RyR3, which demonstrate normal motor function, but possess numerous behavioral and social defects (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The antiviral protein viperin (RSAD2) is induced by viral infection, lipopolysaccharides (LPS), polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I:C)], and interferons (1,2). Viperin protein localizes to the ER and redistributes to the Golgi and then to lipid droplets following viral infection (1,3). Viruses are known to use lipid droplets for replication, and the localization of the antiviral viperin protein to these lipid droplets is likely part of a cellular mechanism to inhibit these pathogens (4). Research studies indicate that induction of viperin by HIV in human macrophages inhibits virus production, and that siRNA targeting viperin reduced the inhibition of HIV replication observed in poly(I:C) treated astrocytes (5,6). Additional research suggests that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) co-opts viperin protein function, resulting in an interaction between viperin and the viral protein vMIA. This association leads to relocalization of viperin to mitochondria, resulting in disruption of ATP generation and the actin cytoskeleton, and increased viral infection (7). The viperin protein also contributes to innate immune signaling by recruiting IRAK1 ant TRAF6 to lipid droplets, which results in activation of IRF7 and induction of type I interferon (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Syk is a protein tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in intracellular signal transduction in hematopoietic cells (1-3). Syk interacts with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) located in the cytoplasmic domains of immune receptors (4). It couples the activated immunoreceptors to downstream signaling events that mediate diverse cellular responses, including proliferation, differentiation, and phagocytosis (4). There is also evidence of a role for Syk in nonimmune cells and investigators have indicated that Syk is a potential tumor suppressor in human breast carcinomas (5). Tyr323 is a negative regulatory phosphorylation site within the SH2-kinase linker region in Syk. Phosphorylation at Tyr323 provides a direct binding site for the TKB domain of Cbl (6,7). Tyr352 of Syk is involved in the association of PLCγ1 (8). Tyr525 and Tyr526 are located in the activation loop of the Syk kinase domain; phosphorylation at Tyr525/526 of human Syk (equivalent to Tyr519/520 of mouse Syk) is essential for Syk function (9).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein Rb regulates cell proliferation by controlling progression through the restriction point within the G1-phase of the cell cycle (1). Rb has three functionally distinct binding domains and interacts with critical regulatory proteins including the E2F family of transcription factors, c-Abl tyrosine kinase, and proteins with a conserved LXCXE motif (2-4). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation by a CDK inhibits Rb target binding and allows cell cycle progression (5). Rb inactivation and subsequent cell cycle progression likely requires an initial phosphorylation by cyclin D-CDK4/6 followed by cyclin E-CDK2 phosphorylation (6). Specificity of different CDK/cyclin complexes has been observed in vitro (6-8) and cyclin D1 is required for Ser780 phosphorylation in vivo (9).