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Product listing: NDRG1 (D6C2) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q92597 #9408 to Ibrutinib #16483

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), also termed Cap43, Drg1, RTP/rit42, and Proxy-1, is a member of the NDRG family, which is composed of four members (NDRG1-4) that function in growth, differentiation, and cell survival (1-5). NDRG1 is ubiquitously expressed and highly responsive to a variety of stress signals including DNA damage (4), hypoxia (5), and elevated levels of nickel and calcium (2). Expression of NDRG1 is elevated in N-myc defective mice and is negatively regulated by N- and c-myc (1,6). During DNA damage, NDRG1 is induced in a p53-dependent fashion and is necessary for p53-mediated apoptosis (4,7). Research studies have shown that NDRG1 may also play a role in cancer progression by promoting differentiation, inhibiting growth, and modulating metastasis and angiogenesis (3,4,6,8,9). Nonsense mutation of the NDRG1 gene has been shown to cause hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom (HMSNL), which is supported by studies demonstrating the role of NDRG1 in maintaining myelin sheaths and axonal survival (10,11). NDRG1 is up-regulated during mast cell maturation and its deletion leads to attenuated allergic responses (12). Both NDRG1 and NDRG2 are substrates of SGK1, although the precise physiological role of SGK1-mediated phosphorylation is not known (13). NDRG1 is phosphorylated by SGK1 at Thr328, Ser330, Thr346, Thr356, and Thr366. Phosphorylation by SGK1 primes NDRG1 for phosphorylation by GSK-3.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) catalyzes decarboxylation of the glycolytic intermediate pyruvate to acetyl-CoA (1). Acetyl-CoA is further metabolized in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to generate ATP and NADH (1). Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDHK1) phosphorylates PDH to suppress its activity, while pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase 1 (PDP1) dephosphorylates PDH to enhance its activity (1). Phosphorylation of PDP1 at Tyr94 inhibits PDP1 and has been shown to be present in a variety of cancer cell lines and primary human leukemia cells (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Efficient termination of mRNA translation in eukaryotes is dependent upon a complex of two polypeptide release factors, eRF1 and eRF3 (1). The eukaryotic translation termination factor 1 (eRF1, ETF1) structurally resembles tRNA, which allows it to participate in stop codon recognition as well as hydrolysis of the peptidyl-tRNA conjugate (2,3). The eRF1 protein contains three functionally distinct domains, including an amino-terminal domain that harbors discrete motifs that participate in stop codon recognition (4,5). Lysine hydroxylation within the amino-terminal domain is required for efficient termination of mRNA translation (6). The central region of eRF1 harbors a GGQ motif that facilitates hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNA conjugates (7), while its carboxy terminus participates in eRF3 binding (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Leucine-rich immunoglobulin repeats 1 (LRIG1) is a type I transmembrane protein containing 15 leucine rich repeats and three immunoglobulin domains in the extracellular domain. Researchers characterize LRIG1 as a negative regulator of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. In studies with ErbB family members and Met kinase, LRIG regulates signaling by increasing ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of the receptors (1,2). Additional work indicates that LRIG1 plays a role in neurotropic signaling by negatively regulating Ret signaling (3,4). Expression profile studies demonstrate that LRIG1 is a marker in the quiescent population of stem cells in the intestine (5). Interestingly, the genetic ablation of one allele of LRIG1 in mice with an APC+/- background results in development of highly dysplastic adenomas, indicating a role for LRIG1 in tumor suppression (1). Indeed, down-regulation of LRIG1 is tentatively involved in tumor aggressiveness in several tumor types, including glioma (6), head and neck cancer (7), and cervical adenocarcinoma (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: EPAC1 and EPAC2 (exchange proteins activated by cyclic AMP) are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP, activating Rap1 and Rap2 small GTPases. Rap activation by EPAC is cAMP-dependent and mediates cAMP signaling in part through protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 1). EPAC signaling plays a significant role in a number of cellular processes including migration and focal adhesion formation (2), exocytosis (3), insulin signaling (4), axon growth and guidance (5) and neurotransmitter release (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The annexin superfamily consists of 13 calcium or calcium and phospholipid binding proteins with high biological and structural homology (1). Annexin-1 (ANXA1) is the first characterized member of the annexin family of proteins and is able to bind to cellular membranes in a calcium-dependent manner, promoting membrane fusion and endocytosis (2-4). Annexin A1 has anti-inflammatory properties and inhibits phospholipase A2 activity (5,6). Annexin A1 can accumulate on internalized vesicles after EGF-stimulated endocytosis and may be required for a late stage in inward vesiculation (7). Phosphorylation by PKC, EGFR, and Chak1 results in inhibition of annexin A1 function (8-10). Annexin A1 has also been identified as one of the 'eat-me' signals on apoptotic cells that are to be recognized and ingested by phagocytes (11). Annexin A1, as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator, has roles in many diverse cellular functions, such as membrane aggregation, inflammation, phagocytosis, proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis and cancer development (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ran is a small GTPase of the Ras family that plays a central role in the spacial and temperal organization of eukaryotic cells. During interphase, Ran-GDP localizes to the cytoplasm and Ran-GTP to the nucleus. This polarized localization of Ran ensures its role in nuclear transport (1). During mitosis, Ran-GTP is chromatin associated, where it promotes spindle assembly and nuclear envolope formation (1,2). In S phase, Ran-GTP associates with and inhibits MCM helicase, ensuring precise chromosomal DNA duplication during the cell cycle (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, stem cell self-renewal, cell cycle regulation and oncogenesis by maintaining the silenced state of genes that promote cell lineage specification, cell death and cell-cycle arrest (1-4). PcG proteins exist in two complexes that cooperate to maintain long-term gene silencing through epigenetic chromatin modifications: PRC1 and PRC2. PRC1 is a multi-subunit protein complex consisting of a combination of five core protein families: CBX, RING1, PHC, PCGF, and RYPB (5-7). Different combinations of protein family members lead to a diverse array of PRC1 complexes with distinct functions (8). At least two distinct classes of PRC1 complexes have been defined. The first class, known as canonical PRC1, contains RING1, PHC, PCGF and CBX protein subunits, but not RYPB (5-8). This class of PRC1 complexes requires PRC2 and H3K27Me3 for proper recruitment to target genes. CBX proteins mediate recruitment by binding to H3K27Me3. CBX8 in particular is required for repression of many lineage-specific genes during differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells and may play a role in activation of lineage-specific genes during differentiation of embryonic stem cells (9,10). The second class, known as variant PRC1, contains RYPB instead of CBX proteins (5-8). RYBP-containing PRC1 is recruited to chromatin independently of PRC2 and H3K27Me3. These variant PRC1 complexes can function independently of PRC2, or in some cases function upstream to recruit PRC2 complex to target genes.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bid is a pro-apoptotic “BH3 domain-only” member of the Bcl-2 family originally discovered to interact with both the anti-apoptotic family member Bcl-2 and the pro-apoptotic protein Bax (1). Bid is normally localized in the cytosolic fraction of cells as an inactive precursor and is cleaved at Asp60 by caspase-8 during Fas signaling, leading to translocation of the carboxyl terminal p15 fragment (tBid) to the mitochondrial outer membrane (2-4). Translocation of Bid is associated with release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria, leading to complex formation with Apaf-1 and caspase-9 and resulting in caspase-9 activation (5-7). Thus, Bid relays an apoptotic signal from the cell surface to the mitochondria triggering caspase activation (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Bcl-2 family consists of a number of evolutionarily conserved proteins containing Bcl-2 homology domains (BH) that regulate apoptosis through control of mitochondrial membrane permeability and release of cytochrome c (1-3). Four BH domains have been identified (BH1-4) that mediate protein interactions. The family can be separated into three groups based upon function and sequence homology: pro-survival members include Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, A1 and Bcl-w; pro-apoptotic proteins include Bax, Bak and Bok; and "BH3 only" proteins Bad, Bik, Bid, Puma, Bim, Bmf, Noxa and Hrk. Interactions between death-promoting and death-suppressing Bcl-2 family members has led to a rheostat model in which the ratio of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins controls cell fate (4). Thus, pro-survival members exert their behavior by binding to and antagonizing death-promoting members. In general, the "BH3-only members" can bind to and antagonize the pro-survival proteins leading to increased apoptosis (5). While some redundancy of this system likely exists, tissue specificity, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of many of these family members can account for distinct physiological roles.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: The super elongation complex (SEC) plays a critical role in regulating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription elongation (1). The SEC is composed of AFF4, AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, and MLLT1/ENL proteins. The pathogenesis of mixed lineage leukemia is often associated with translocations of the SEC subunits joined to the histone H3 Lys4 methyltransferase mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene (1-4). The SEC has been found to contain RNAPII elongation factors eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukemia (ELL), ELL2, and ELL3, along with the associated factors EAF1 and EAF2, which can increase the catalytic rate of RNAPII transcription in vitro, (1,2,5-7). The SEC positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) phosphorylates the carboxy-terminal domain within the largest subunit of RNAP II at Ser2 of the heptapeptide repeat. The SEC negative transcription elongation factors, DRB-induced stimulating factor (DSIF) and negative elongation factor (NELF), signal the transition from transcription initiation and pausing to productive transcription elongation (2,8-10). The chromosomal translocation of MLL with the members of the SEC leads to SEC recruitment to MLL regulated genes, such as the highly developmentally regulated Hox genes, implicating the misregulation and overexpression of these genes as underlying contributors to leukemogenesis (1,2,9,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Frizzled (Fzd) belongs to the seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily (1). Fzds have a large extracellular N-terminal region containing a cysteine-rich domain (CRD), which is involved in binding to Wnt proteins (1,2). The intracellular C-terminus binds to the PDZ domain of Dvl proteins, a major signaling component downstream of Fzd (3). Wnt proteins bind to Fzd and the co-receptors LRP5 or LPR6, and activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway through inhibiting phosphorylation of β-catenin by GSK3-β (4,5). In addition to this canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway, some Wnt proteins can also activate the Fzd/Ca2+ pathway and Fzd/PCP (planar cell polarity) pathway (6,7). The mammalian Fzd subfamily has 10 members (Fzd1 to Fzd10) and they may mediate signaling through different pathways (8). Some Fzds can also bind to other secreted proteins, like Norrin and R-Spondin (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD or 6PGD) catalyzes the conversion of 6-phosphogluconate and NADP+ to ribulose 5-phosphate and NADPH in the pentose phosphate pathway (1). Research studies show that knockdown of PGD results in the induction of senescence and inhibition of growth of lung cancer cells (2). Additional research suggests that PGD influences the migration of some cancer cells by regulating c-Met phosphorylation state (3). Furthermore, it was shown that the glycolytic enzyme PGAM1 substrate (3-phosphoglycerate) regulates the pentose phosphate pathway by deactivating PGD/6PGD (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant for formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The JARID (Jumonji/AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein) family contains four members: JARID1A (also RBP2 and RBBP2), JARID1B (also PLU-1), JARID1C (also SMCX) and JARID1D (also SMCY) (4). In addition to the JmJC domain, these proteins contain JmJN, BRIGHT, C5HC2 zinc-finger, and PHD domains, the latter of which binds to methylated histone H3 (Lys9) (4). All four JARID proteins demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys4; JARID1B also demethylates mono-methyl histone H3 Lys4 (5-7). JARID1A is a critical RB-interacting protein and is required for Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional repression during ES cell differentiation (8). A JARID1A-NUP98 gene fusion is associated with myeloid leukemia (9). JARID1B, which interacts with many proteins including c-Myc and HDAC4, may play a role in cell fate decisions by blocking terminal differentiation (10-12). JARID1B is over-expressed in many breast cancers and may act by repressing multiple tumor suppressor genes including BRCA1 and HOXA5 (13,14). JARID1C has been found in a complex with HDAC1, HDAC2, G9a and REST, which binds to and represses REST target genes in non-neuronal cells (7). JARID1C mutations are associated with X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy (15,16). JARID1D is largely uncharacterized.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 are transmembrane proteins belonging to the presenilin family. Mutation of presenilin genes has been linked to early onset of Alzheimer disease, probably due to presenilin's associated γ-secretase activity for amyloid-β protein processing (1,2). Endogenous presenilin mainly exists in a heterodimeric complex formed from the endoproteolytically processed amino-terminal (34 kDa) and carboxy-terminal (~20, 22, 23 kDa) fragments (CTF) (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The modulation of chromatin structure is an essential component in the regulation of transcriptional activation and repression. Modifications can be made by at least two evolutionarily conserved strategies, through the disruption of histone-DNA contacts by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, or by histone tail modifications including methylation and acetylation. One of the four classes of ATP-dependent histone remodelers is the SWI/SNF complex, the central catalytic subunit of which is Brg1 or the highly related protein hBRM (1). This SWI/SNF complex contains varying subunits but its association with either Brg1 or hBRM remains constant (1). SWI/SNF complexes have been shown to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle and differentiation (1). Brg1/hBRM have been shown to regulate transcription through enhancing transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptors (2). Although usually associated with transcriptional activation, Brg1/hBRM have also been found in complexes associated with transcriptional repression including with HDACs, Rb and Tif1β (3-5). Brg1/hBRM plays a vital role in the regulation of gene transcription during early mammalian embryogenesis. In addition, Brg1/hBRM also play a role as a tumor suppressors and Brg1 is mutated in several tumor cell lines (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: IDH1 is one of three isocitrate dehydrogenases that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). These enzymes exist in two distinct subclasses that utilize either NAD or NADP+ respectively, as an electron acceptor (1). IDH1 is the NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase found in the cytoplasm and peroxisomes. IDH2 and 3 are mitochondrial enzymes that also function in the Krebs cycle. IDH1 is inactivated by phosphorylation at Ser113 and contains a clasp-like domain wherein both polypeptide chains in the dimer interlock (2,3). IDH1 is expressed in a wide range of species and also in organisms that lack a complete citric acid cycle. Mutations in IDH1 have been reported in glioblastoma (4), acute myeloid leukemia (5,6), and other malignancies (7). IDH1 appears to function as a tumor suppressor that, when mutationally inactivated, contributes to tumorigenesis in part through induction of the HIF-1 pathway (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Three distinct types of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) have been characterized. Unlike other PI3Ks, PI3K class III catalyzes the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol at the D3 position, producing phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PIP3) (1). PI3K class III is the mammalian homolog of Vps34, first identified in yeast. PI3K class III interacts with the regular subunit p150, the mammalian homolog of Vps15, which regulates cellular membrane association through myristoylation (2,3). PIP3 recruits several proteins with FYVE or PX domains to membranes regulating vesicular transport and protein sorting (4). Moreover, PI3K class III has been shown to regulate autophagy, trimeric G-protein signaling, and the mTOR nutrient-sensing pathway (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) comprise a family of transcription factors that function within the Jak/Stat pathway to regulate interferon (IFN) and IFN-inducible gene expression in response to viral infection (1). IRFs play an important role in pathogen defense, autoimmunity, lymphocyte development, cell growth, and susceptibility to transformation. The IRF family includes nine members: IRF-1, IRF-2, IRF-9/ISGF3γ, IRF-3, IRF-4 (Pip/LSIRF/ICSAT), IRF-5, IRF-6, IRF-7, and IRF-8/ICSBP. All IRF proteins share homology in their amino-terminal DNA-binding domains. IRF family members regulate transcription through interactions with proteins that share similar DNA-binding motifs, such as IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE), IFN consensus sequences (ICS), and IFN regulatory elements (IRF-E) (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: In response to genomic stress, the ATR interacting protein (ATRIP) binds and is phosphorylated by the DNA damage-and checkpoint-activated kinase ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and rad3-related). Both ATR and ATRIP are integral for checkpoint signaling and are critical in the DNA repair response (1-3). Direct interaction between ATRIP and replication protein A (RPA) at RPA-coated, single-stranded DNA results in the recruitment of phosphorylated ATR/ATRIP to stalled replication forks and sites of DNA damage (3). ATR/ATRIP coordinate DNA repair and cell cycle progression in conjunction with key regulatory proteins, such as Rad17 and the 9-1-1 complex (4). ATR associated with ATRIP can also be stimulated by topoisomerase II binding protein (TOPBP1), suggesting that ATRIP may regulate both ATR localization and activity (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. As a critical part of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC), the third member of the tubulin superfamily, γ-tubulin, is required for microtubule nucleation as well as centrosome duplication and spindle assembly (1,2, reviewed in 3). γ-tubulin forms complexes of two different sizes: γ-tubulin small complex (γ-TuSC) and the larger γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC). Each complex consists of a number of γ-tubulin complex proteins (GCPs) with γ-tubulin itself being considered GCP1. GCP2-6 all share sequence similarity in 5 different regions and it is thought that these areas could play a role in the proper folding of the proteins (4). γ-TuSC is composed of two γ-tubulin molecules as well as GCP2 and GCP3. γ-TuRC is made up of a ring of multiple copies of γ-TuSC in addition to GCP4, 5, and 6. Another protein, GCP-WD/NEDD1, which lacks sequence similarity with the other GCPs, associates with the γ-TuRC. GCP-WD/NEDD1 has been shown to regulate localization of the γ-TuSC to spindles and centrosomes (5-8). In mammals, phosphorylation of γ-tubulin at Ser131 by SADB controls the activity of the γ-TuRC. The hypothesis is that this phosphorylation stabilizes the protein in a conformation that stimulates centrosome amplification (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: SORL1, also called SorLA, is a 250 kDa type-1 membrane protein found in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous system (1). SORL1 is related to the yeast transporter Vps10p (2). While its exact function is unknown, because it shuttles between the Golgi apparatus and endolysosomal compartments, and given its structural similarity with Vps10p, it has been suggested that SORL1 acts in intracellular trafficking (3). Interestingly, SORL1 expression has been shown to be decreased in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (4), and research studies have demonstrated a role for SORL1 as a neuronal sorting receptor that binds APP and regulates its trafficking and proteolytic processing, thus regulating the production of amyloid-beta peptides (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are α/β heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins having distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2).The αVβ5 integrin is expressed in various tissues and cell types, including endothelia, epithelia and fibroblasts (4). It plays a role in matrix adhesion to VN, FN, SPARC and bone sialoprotein (5) and functions in the invasion of gliomas and metastatic carcinoma cells (6,7). αVβ5 integrin plays a major role in growth-factor-induced tumor angiogenesis, where cooperative signaling by the αVβ5 integrin and growth factors regulates endothelial cell proliferation and survival (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MEF2A is a member of the MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor 2) family of transcription factors. In mammals, four MEF2A-related genes (MEF2A, MEF2B, MEF2C and MEF2D) encode proteins which exhibit significant amino acid sequence similarity within their DNA binding domains and to a lesser extent throughout the remaining proteins (1). The MEF2 family members were originally described as muscle-specific DNA binding proteins that recognize MEF2 motifs found within the promoters of many muscle-specific genes (2,3). Phosphorylation of MEF2A at Thr312 and Thr319 within the transcription activation domain by p38 MAP kinase enhances MEF2A-MEF2D heterodimer-dependent gene expression (4). On the other hand, apoptotic stimuli (e.g. neurotoxic insult) result in CDK5-dependent phosphorylation of MEF2A at Ser408 within the activation domain, inhibiting MEF2A pro-survival function (5).

Each control slide contains formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded cell pellets: Raw 264.7 (mPD-L1 negative) and mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (mPD-L1 positive), which serve as controls for mPD-L1 immunostaining.

Background: Programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1, B7-H1, CD274) is a member of the B7 family of cell surface ligands that regulate T cell activation and immune responses. The PD-L1 ligand binds the PD-1 transmembrane receptor and inhibits T cell activation. PD-L1 was discovered following a search for novel B7 protein homologs and was later shown to be expressed by antigen presenting cells, activated T cells, and tissues including placenta, heart, and lung (1-3). Similar in structure to related B7 family members, PD-L1 protein contains extracellular IgV and IgC domains and a short, cytoplasmic region. Research studies demonstrate that PD-L1 is expressed in several tumor types, including melanoma, ovary, colon, lung, breast, and renal cell carcinomas (4-6). Expression of PD-L1 in cancer is associated with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, which mediate PD-L1 expression through the release of interferon gamma (7). Additional research links PD-L1 expression to cancers associated with viral infections (8,9).