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Product listing: IL-2Rβ (D4X3H) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P14784 #46307 to SimpleDIP™ Hydroxymethylated DNA IP (hMeDIP) Kit #95176

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a T cell stimulatory cytokine best known for inducing T cell proliferation and NK cell proliferation and activation (1,2). IL-2 also promotes peripheral development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) (3,4). Conversely, IL-2 is involved in the activation-induced cell death (AICD) that is observed post T cell expansion by increasing levels of Fas on CD4+ T cells (5). The effects of IL-2 are mediated through a trimeric receptor complex consisting of IL-2Rα, IL-2Rβ, and the common gamma chain, γc (1,2). IL-2Rα binds exclusively to IL-2 with low affinity and increases the binding affinity of the whole receptor complex including IL-2Rβ and γc subunits. IL-15 also binds to IL-2Rβ (1,2). γc is used by other cytokines including IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21 (1,2). Binding of IL-2 initiates signaling cascades involving Jak1, Jak3, Stat5, and the PI3K/Akt pathways (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) is a coiled coil protein involved in the formation and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. NuMA plays a role in chromatin organization during interphase, which influences mammary epithelial differentiation (1,2). During apoptosis, carboxy-terminal cleavage of NuMA may amplify signaling in the cell death pathway (2). NuMA is phosphorylated at numerous sites, with phosphorylation at Ser395 occurring in an ATM/ATR-dependent manner in response to DNA damage (3,4).Phosphorylation at Thr2055 by CDK1 is required for spindle pole association of NuMA at the onset of mitosis. Dephosphorylation by PPP2CA leads to enhancement of NuMA at the cell cortex in anaphase and proper cell-cycle progression (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Thioredoxin is a small redox protein found in many eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A pair of cysteines within a highly conserved, active site sequence can be oxidized to form a disulfide bond that is then reduced by thioredoxin reductase (1). Multiple forms of thioredoxin have been identified, including cytosolic thioredoxin 1 (TRX1) and mitochondrial thioredoxin 2 (TRX2). Thioredoxin participates in many cellular processes including redox signaling, response to oxidative stress, and protein reduction (1). A potential role of thioredoxin in human disorders such as cancer, aging, and heart disease is currently under investigation (2). Thioredoxin can play a key role in cancer progression, because it acts as a negative regulator of the proapoptotic kinase ASK1 (3). Changes in thioredoxin expression have been associated with meningococcal septic shock and acute lung injury (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) catalyze protein ubiquitination, a reversible process countered by deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) action (1,2). Five DUB subfamilies are recognized, including the USP, UCH, OTU, MJD and JAMM enzymes. Herpesvirus-associated ubiquitin-specific protease (HAUSP, USP7) is an important deubiquitinase belonging to USP subfamily. A key HAUSP function is to bind and deubiquitinate the p53 transcription factor and an associated regulator protein Mdm2, thereby stabilizing both proteins (3,4). In addition to regulating essential components of the p53 pathway, HAUSP also modifies other ubiquitinylated proteins such as members of the FoxO family of forkhead transcription factors and the mitotic stress checkpoint protein CHFR (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: FERM domain-containing protein 6 (FRMD6, Willin) belongs to the 4.1 superfamily, a group of proteins characterized by the presence of a Band 4.1, Ezrin, Radixin, Moesin (FERM) domain in the amino-terminal region (1). Members of this protein superfamily, which also includes Merlin, Ezrin, Radixin, Moesin and Talin, function primarily as adaptor proteins that link plasma membrane-associated proteins to the actin cytoskeleton (2). FRMD6 is considered orthologous to the Drosophila Expanded (Ex) protein, which is a 4.1 family protein that functions together with Merlin and Kibra to regulate Hippo signaling, upstream of the Salvador/Warts/Hippo core kinase cassette (3). Research studies suggest a similar role for FRMD6 in regulating the Hippo pathway in mammals. For example, ectopic expression of FRMD6 leads to increased phosphorylation of MST1/2, LATS1, and YAP, which is indicative of Hippo pathway activation. Loss of FRMD6 expression in MCF10A cells induces a phenotype change resembling epithelial-mesenchymal transition (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-associated factor 1 (XAF1) is a zinc finger protein that antagonizes the anti-apoptotic activity of XIAP (1,2). XIAP, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family, inhibits apoptosis by direct inhibition of caspases (3; reviewed in 4). XAF1 is widely expressed in normal tissues, with highest levels in the heart and ovary, but is mostly reduced in cancer lines (1,2). Expression of XAF1 can be induced by interferons via Stat transcriptional activity (5-7). The levels of XAF1 have been shown to be inversely correlated with p53, and p53 is directly responsible for inhibiting XAF1 transcription (8,9). A number of studies have shown that XAF1 can function as a tumor suppressor protein, and decreased levels of XAF1 are found in a variety of different cancers (10-13). Research studies suggest that expression of XAF1 may be a prognostic biomarker for some cancers (14-16).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Hippo pathway is an important evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway that controls organ size and tumor suppression by inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis (1,2). An integral function of the Hippo pathway is to repress the activity of YAP (Yes-associated protein), a proposed oncogene whose activity is regulated by phosphorylation and subcellular localization (3,4). Recent studies have identified KIBRA as a novel regulator of Hippo signaling (5-7). KIBRA has been shown to regulate Hippo signaling through its interaction with tumor suppressors Merlin (Mer) and Expanded (Ex) in Drosophila (7) and by associating with large tumor suppressors LATS1 and LATS2 in humans (8). In humans, KIBRA is predominantly expressed in the kidney and brain (9) and has been shown to play a role in hippocampus-related memory performance (10-12). Recent studies have shown that phosphorylation of KIBRA is highest during mitosis and is controlled by aurora kinase and protein phosphatase 1 (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Class 3 secreted semaphorin (Sema3A) is a chemorepellent that acts upon a wide variety of axons. As such, it induces a dramatic redistribution and depolymerization of actin filaments that results in growth cone collapse. Plexins are single membrane-spanning signaling proteins encompassing Plexin A1, A2, A3, and A4. Plexins form a complex with neuropilin-1 and -2 and the cell adhesion protein L1 to form a functional semaphorin receptor (1,2). The GTPase Rnd1 binds to the cytoplasmic domain of Plexin A1 to trigger cytoskeletal collapse. In contrast, the GTPase RhoD blocks Rnd1-mediated Plexin A1 activation and repulsion of sympathetic axons by Sema3A (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Rab11a, Rab11b, and Rab25 are members of the Rab11 subfamily of small Ras-like GTPases. Unlike universally expressed Rab11, typical Rab25 expression appears to be limited to gastrointestinal mucosa, kidney, and lung (1). Rab25 can associate with apical recycling vesicles to help regulate apical vesicle trafficking (2,3). Research studies indicate that atypical Rab25 expression can be associated with various forms of cancer. Increased Rab25 expression is associated with aggressive growth in ovarian and breast cancer, where Rab25 may inhibit apoptosis and promote cancer cell proliferation and invasion through regulation of vesicle transport and cellular motility (4-7). Interaction between Rab25 and β1 integrin promotes vesicle-mediated transport of integrin to pseudopodial tip membranes, fostering the persistent invasion of tumor cells (8). Conversely, the reported loss of Rab25 expression in a number of breast cancer cases has an unclear effect on cancer pathogenesis (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Granzymes are a family of serine proteases expressed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells and are key components of immune responses to pathogens and transformed cells (1). Granzymes are synthesized as zymogens and are processed into mature enzymes by cleavage of a leader sequence. They are released by exocytosis in lysosome-like granules containing perforin, a membrane pore-forming protein. Granzyme B has the strongest apoptotic activity of all the granzymes as a result of its caspase-like ability to cleave substrates at aspartic acid residues thereby activating procaspases directly and cleaving downstream caspase substrates (2,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Adherens junctions are dynamic structures that form cell-cell contacts and are important in development, differentiation, tissue integrity, morphology and cell polarity. They are composed of the transmembrane proteins, cadherins, which bind cadherins on adjacent cells in a calcium-dependent manner. On the cytoplasmic side of adherens junctions, the classic model states that cadherins are linked to the cytoskeleton through β- and α-catenin. α-E-catenin is ubiquitously expressed, α-N-catenin is expressed in neuronal tissue, and α-T-catenin is primarily expressed in heart tissue. Research studies have demonstrated that loss of E-cadherin and α-E-catenin occurs during the progression of several human cancers, indicating that the breakdown of adherens junctions is important in cancer progression (reviewed in 1).Research studies also suggest that, rather than acting as a static link between cadherins and actin, α-catenin regulates actin dynamics directly, possibly by competing with the actin nucleating arp2/3 complex (2,3). α-catenin also plays a role in regulating β-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity, affecting differentiation and response to Wnt signaling. α-catenin binds to β-catenin in the nucleus, preventing it from regulating transcription, and levels of both proteins appear to be regulated via proteasome-dependent degradation (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reversible processes catalyzed by ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) respectively (1,2). DUBs are categorized into five subfamilies-USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM. Ubiquitin-specific protease 9, X-linked (USP9X) possesses a well-conserved catalytic domain with cysteine peptidase activity, which allows for cleavage of ubiquitin and polyubiquitin conjugates. USP9X is the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila fat-facets (faf) gene, which is essential for normal eye development and viability of the early fly embryo (3,4). While USP9X expression is also critical for normal mammalian development (5-7), many of its substrates are only beginning to be elucidated. There is mounting evidence that USP9X functions in the formation of epithelial cell-cell contacts through deubiquitination-dependent stabilization of molecules involved in maintaining the integrity of both adherens and tight junctions. Indeed, USP9X has been found to associate with AF-6, the β-catenin-E-cadherin complex, and EFA6 (8-11). Research studies have also demonstrated that USP9X is an integral component of the TGF-β/BMP signaling cascade by opposing TRIM33-mediated monoubiquitination of SMAD4 (12). USP9X is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers and contributes to enhanced cell survival, in part, through its ability to deubiquitinate and stabilize the Mcl-1 oncoprotein (13). There is some evidence, however, that suggests the role of USP9X in tumorigenesis is context dependent. Research studies have implicated USP9X in a tumor suppressor role during the early stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and in an oncogenic role during advanced stages of PDAC (14,15).

$132
100 µl
Rabbit (DA1E) mAb IgG XP® Isotype Control (Biotinylated) antibody was conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and western blot.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: Isotype control antibodies are used to estimate the nonspecific binding of target primary antibodies due to Fc receptor binding or other protein-protein interactions. An isotype control antibody should have the same immunoglobulin type and be used at the same concentration as the test antibody.

PhosphoPlus® Duets from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) provide a means to assess protein activation status. Each Duet contains an activation-state and total protein antibody to your target of interest. These antibodies have been selected from CST's product offering based upon superior performance in specified applications.

Background: Stat5 is activated in response to a wide variety of ligands including IL-2, GM-CSF, growth hormone and prolactin. Phosphorylation at Tyr694 is obligatory for Stat5 activation (1,2). This phosphorylation is mediated by Src upon erythropoietin stimulation (3). Stat5 is constitutively active in some leukemic cell types (4). Phosphorylated Stat5 is found in some endothelial cells treated with IL-3, which suggests its involvement in angiogenesis and cell motility (5). Stat5a and Stat5b are independently regulated and activated in various cell types. For instance, interferon treatment predominantly activates Stat5a in U-937 cells and Stat5b in HeLa cells (6).

PhosphoPlus® Duets from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) provide a means to assess protein activation status. Each Duet contains an activation-state and total protein antibody to your target of interest. These antibodies have been selected from CST's product offering based upon superior performance in specified applications.

Background: Glycogen is a polysaccharide of glucose and serves as an energy storage in mammalian muscle and liver (1). Glycogen synthase catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen biosynthesis and has two major isoforms in mammals -- muscle isoform (GYS1) and liver isoform (GYS2) respectively (1). Glycogen synthase kinase-3α (GSK-3α) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylate glycogen synthase at multiple sites in its C-terminus (Ser641, Ser645, Ser649 and Ser653) inhibiting its activity (2, 3). Hypoxia alters glycogen metabolism including temporal changes of GYS1 expression and phosphorylation in cancer cells, suggesting the role of metabolic reprogramming of glycogen metabolism in cancer growth (1).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Total Vimentin Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of total vimentin protein. A Vimentin Mouse mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, both phospho- and nonphospho-vimentin protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a Vimentin Rabbit Detection Antibody is added to detect the captured vimentin protein. Anti-rabbit IgG, HRP-linked antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of optical density for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of vimentin protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
PathScan® Total RSK1 Sandwich ELISA Kit from Cell Signaling Technology is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of total RSK1 protein. A RSK1 Rabbit mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, both phospho- and nonphospho-RSK1 proteins are captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a RSK1 Mouse Antibody is added to detect both the captured phospho- and nonphospho-RSK1 protein. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of optical density for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of total RSK1 protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinases (RSK1-4) are a family of widely expressed Ser/Thr kinases characterized by two nonidentical, functional kinase domains (1) and a carboxy-terminal docking site for extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) (2). Several sites both within and outside of the RSK kinase domain, including Ser380, Thr359, Ser363, and Thr573, are important for kinase activation (3). RSK1-3 are activated via coordinated phosphorylation by MAPKs, autophosphorylation, and phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K) in response to many growth factors, polypeptide hormones, and neurotransmitters (3).

The ER Protein Folding Antibody Sampler Kit contains reagents to investigate the initiation of translation within the cell. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments per primary antibody.
The Autophagy Atg8 Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting each of the Atg8 family members. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation, but it has also been associated with a number of physiological processes, including development, differentiation, neurodegenerative diseases, infection, and cancer (3).Atg8 is a ubiquitin-like protein that is critical for autophagosome formation. Atg8 is synthesized as a precursor protein that is processed by the cysteine protease Atg4, followed by lipidation with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in a ubiqutin-like conjugation pathway involving Atg7 and Atg3 (4). This processing of Atg8, which is described as a conversion from type-I to type-II forms, is frequently described as a marker for autophagy. The type-II form of Atg8 is incorporated into maturing autophagosomes and leads to the recruitment of additional autophagy components, including cargo receptors like SQSTM1/p62. While yeast has a single Atg8 gene, many eukaryotes have at least six orthologs, including three microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1LC3/LC3) family members (LC3A, LC3B, and LC3C) and three GABAA receptor associated protein (GABARAP) family members (GABARAP, GABARAPL1/GEC1, and GABARAPL2/GATE-16). While highly conserved, these various family members can have important differences in their post-translational processing, expression profile, and protein interactions including distinct cargo receptor. This complexity within the Atg8 family is critical for selective mechanisms of autophagy that have been reported (5, 6).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
CST's PathScan® Phospho-cdc2 (Tyr15) Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of phospho-cdc2 (Tyr15) protein. A Phospho-cdc2 (Tyr15) Rabbit polyclonal Ab has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, phospho-cdc2 (Tyr15) protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, cdc2 Mouse mAb is added to detect the captured phospho-cdc2 protein. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of optical density for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of phospho-cdc2 (Tyr15) protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The entry of eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by cdc2 kinase activation, a process controlled at several steps including cyclin binding and phosphorylation of cdc2 at Thr161 (1). However, the critical regulatory step in activating cdc2 during progression into mitosis appears to be dephosphorylation of cdc2 at Thr14 and Tyr15 (2). Phosphorylation at Thr14 and Tyr15, resulting in inhibition of cdc2, can be carried out by Wee1 and Myt1 protein kinases (3,4). The cdc25 phosphatase may be responsible for removal of phosphates at Thr14 and Tyr15 and subsequent activation of cdc2 (1,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). Histone acetylation occurs mainly on the amino-terminal tail domains of histones H2A (Lys5), H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20), H3 (Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, 36 and 56), and H4 (Lys5, 8, 12, and 16) and is important for the regulation of histone deposition, transcriptional activation, DNA replication, recombination, and DNA repair (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites for a protein module called the bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins contain bromodomains and may be recruited to gene promoters, in part, through binding of acetylated histone tails. Histone acetylation is mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), such as CBP/p300, GCN5L2, PCAF, and Tip60, which are recruited to genes by DNA-bound protein factors to facilitate transcriptional activation (3). Deacetylation, which is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDAC and sirtuin proteins), reverses the effects of acetylation and generally facilitates transcriptional repression (7,8).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent and flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-CD79A (Tyr182) (D1B9) Rabbit mAb #14732.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Antigen receptors found on the surface of B cells contain a heterodimeric signaling component composed of CD79A and CD79B, also known as Ig α and Ig β, respectively (1,2). Presence of this receptor complex is essential for B-cell development and function (3). Together these two proteins and the associated B cell receptor initiate intracellular signaling following antigen binding (4,5). An immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) found in the CD79A intracellular region appears to be important for its function (6). Antigen binding precedes formation of the CD79A and CD79B heterodimer and subsequent activation of receptor associated kinases (7). Research has shown that CD79A is a marker for B-lineage lymphoblastic leukemia (8). Additionally, investigators have found that mutations in the CD79A (MB1) gene are associated with abnormally low levels of functional B cell receptors in some cases of chronic B cell lymphocytic leukemia (9).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 700 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Bim (C34C5) Rabbit mAb #2933.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Bim/Bod is a pro-apoptotic protein belonging to the BH3-only group of Bcl-2 family members including Bad, Bid, Bik, Hrk, and Noxa that contain a BH3 domain but lack other conserved BH1 or BH2 domains (1,2). Bim induces apoptosis by binding to and antagonizing anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. Interactions have been observed with Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, Bcl-w, Bfl-1, and BHRF-1 (1,2). Bim functions in regulating apoptosis associated with thymocyte negative selection and following growth factor withdrawal, during which Bim expression is elevated (3-6). Three major isoforms of Bim are generated by alternative splicing: BimEL, BimL, and BimS (1). The shortest form, BimS, is the most cytotoxic and is generally only transiently expressed during apoptosis. The BimEL and BimL isoforms may be sequestered to the dynein motor complex through an interaction with the dynein light chain and released from this complex during apoptosis (7). Apoptotic activity of these longer isoforms may be regulated by phosphorylation (8,9). Environmental stress triggers Bim phosphorylation by JNK and results in its dissociation from the dynein complex and increased apoptotic activity.

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Smad2 (Ser465/467) (E8F3R) Rabbit mAb #18338.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmit TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, and 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved carboxy terminal SSXS motif. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad (Smad4), allowing translocation of the complex to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$380
10 immunoprecipitations
1 Kit
The SimpleDIP™ Hydroxymethylated DNA IP (hMeDIP) Kit provides enough reagents to perform up to 10 genomic DNA preparations and 10 IPs from mammalian cells and is optimized for 1 μg of genomic DNA per IP. The SimpleDIP™ protocol can be performed in as little as two days and can easily be scaled up or down for use with more or less cells. Cells are first lysed and genomic DNA is extracted and sonicated into small fragments (200-500 bp). DNA IPs are performed using 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) (HMC31) Mouse mAb and ChIP-Grade Protein G Magnetic Beads. After elution from the beads, the DNA is purified using DNA purification spin columns provided in the kit. The enrichment of particular DNA sequences can be analyzed by a variety of methods including standard PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, or next-generation sequencing. The SimpleDIP™ 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine DNA IP Kit provides a highly validated 5-hmC monoclonal antibody to ensure specific and robust signal. The kit also includes DNA that contains exclusively 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, which can be spiked-in to the IPs as a control. Thus, spiked-in DNA will be immunoprecipitated with 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (HMC1) Mouse mAb, but not with the Mouse (G3A1) mAb IgG1 Isotype Control (DIP Formulated). The relative enrichment can then be quantified using the SimpleDIP Hydroxymethyl Control Primers.

Background: DNA immunoprecipitation (DIP) is a technique that uses antibodies to immunoenrich for regions of the genome containing modified nucleotides. This assay was first used with a 5-methylcytosine antibody to identify differentially methylated sites within normal and transformed cells (1). Investigators can use the DIP assay to look at specific genomic loci or look across the entire genome by utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS) (2). When performing the DIP assay, cells are first lysed and the nucleic acids are recovered using phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. RNA is then removed by RNase A digestion, and genomic DNA is isolated by a second round of phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. The resulting genomic DNA is then fragmented by either restriction enzyme digestion or sonication and subjected to immunoprecipitation (IP) using antibodies specific to the modified nucleotide. Any sequences containing the modified nucleotide will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After IP, the DNA is purified and Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence. Alternatively, the DIP assay can be combined with NGS to provide genome-wide analysis of a specific DNA modification.