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Product listing: Bim (C34C5) Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 700 Conjugate), UniProt ID O43521 #28997 to p53 (7F5) Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 488 Conjugate), UniProt ID P04637 #5429

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 700 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Bim (C34C5) Rabbit mAb #2933.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Bim/Bod is a pro-apoptotic protein belonging to the BH3-only group of Bcl-2 family members including Bad, Bid, Bik, Hrk, and Noxa that contain a BH3 domain but lack other conserved BH1 or BH2 domains (1,2). Bim induces apoptosis by binding to and antagonizing anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. Interactions have been observed with Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, Bcl-w, Bfl-1, and BHRF-1 (1,2). Bim functions in regulating apoptosis associated with thymocyte negative selection and following growth factor withdrawal, during which Bim expression is elevated (3-6). Three major isoforms of Bim are generated by alternative splicing: BimEL, BimL, and BimS (1). The shortest form, BimS, is the most cytotoxic and is generally only transiently expressed during apoptosis. The BimEL and BimL isoforms may be sequestered to the dynein motor complex through an interaction with the dynein light chain and released from this complex during apoptosis (7). Apoptotic activity of these longer isoforms may be regulated by phosphorylation (8,9). Environmental stress triggers Bim phosphorylation by JNK and results in its dissociation from the dynein complex and increased apoptotic activity.

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Smad2 (Ser465/467) (E8F3R) Rabbit mAb #18338.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmit TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, and 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved carboxy terminal SSXS motif. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad (Smad4), allowing translocation of the complex to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$380
10 immunoprecipitations
1 Kit
The SimpleDIP™ Hydroxymethylated DNA IP (hMeDIP) Kit provides enough reagents to perform up to 10 genomic DNA preparations and 10 IPs from mammalian cells and is optimized for 1 μg of genomic DNA per IP. The SimpleDIP™ protocol can be performed in as little as two days and can easily be scaled up or down for use with more or less cells. Cells are first lysed and genomic DNA is extracted and sonicated into small fragments (200-500 bp). DNA IPs are performed using 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) (HMC31) Mouse mAb and ChIP-Grade Protein G Magnetic Beads. After elution from the beads, the DNA is purified using DNA purification spin columns provided in the kit. The enrichment of particular DNA sequences can be analyzed by a variety of methods including standard PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, or next-generation sequencing. The SimpleDIP™ 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine DNA IP Kit provides a highly validated 5-hmC monoclonal antibody to ensure specific and robust signal. The kit also includes DNA that contains exclusively 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, which can be spiked-in to the IPs as a control. Thus, spiked-in DNA will be immunoprecipitated with 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (HMC1) Mouse mAb, but not with the Mouse (G3A1) mAb IgG1 Isotype Control (DIP Formulated). The relative enrichment can then be quantified using the SimpleDIP Hydroxymethyl Control Primers.

Background: DNA immunoprecipitation (DIP) is a technique that uses antibodies to immunoenrich for regions of the genome containing modified nucleotides. This assay was first used with a 5-methylcytosine antibody to identify differentially methylated sites within normal and transformed cells (1). Investigators can use the DIP assay to look at specific genomic loci or look across the entire genome by utilizing next-generation sequencing (NGS) (2). When performing the DIP assay, cells are first lysed and the nucleic acids are recovered using phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. RNA is then removed by RNase A digestion, and genomic DNA is isolated by a second round of phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. The resulting genomic DNA is then fragmented by either restriction enzyme digestion or sonication and subjected to immunoprecipitation (IP) using antibodies specific to the modified nucleotide. Any sequences containing the modified nucleotide will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After IP, the DNA is purified and Quantitative Real-Time PCR can be used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence. Alternatively, the DIP assay can be combined with NGS to provide genome-wide analysis of a specific DNA modification.

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Helios (D8W4X) XP® Rabbit mAb #42427.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Helios (Ikaros family zinc finger 2, IZKF2) is an Ikaros family transcription factor composed of several zinc fingers that mediate DNA binding and homodimerization or heterodimerization with other Ikaros family proteins (1,2). In the hematopoietic system, Helios expression is restricted to T cells and early hematopoietic progenitors (1,2). In regulatory T cells, expression of Helios contributes to an anergic phenotype by binding to the IL-2 promoter and suppressing IL-2 transcription (3). In addition, alteration of the corresponding Helios gene IZKF2 is one hallmark of low-hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia (4).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-c-Jun (Ser73) (D47G9) XP® Rabbit mAb #3270.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: c-Jun is a member of the Jun family containing c-Jun, JunB, and JunD, and is a component of the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1). AP-1 is composed of dimers of Fos, Jun, and ATF family members and binds to and activates transcription at TRE/AP-1 elements (reviewed in 1). Extracellular signals including growth factors, chemokines, and stress activate AP-1-dependent transcription. The transcriptional activity of c-Jun is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser63 and Ser73 through SAPK/JNK (reviewed in 2). Knock-out studies in mice have shown that c-Jun is essential for embryogenesis (3), and subsequent studies have demonstrated roles for c-Jun in various tissues and developmental processes including axon regeneration (4), liver regeneration (5), and T cell development (6). AP-1 regulated genes exert diverse biological functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, as well as transformation, invasion and metastasis, depending on cell type and context (7-9). Other target genes regulate survival, as well as hypoxia and angiogenesis (8,10). Research studies have implicated c-Jun as a promising therapeutic target for cancer, vascular remodeling, acute inflammation, and rheumatoid arthritis (11,12).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated p38 MAPK (D13E1) XP® Rabbit mAb #8690.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: p38 MAP kinase (MAPK), also called RK (1) or CSBP (2), is the mammalian orthologue of the yeast HOG kinase that participates in a signaling cascade controlling cellular responses to cytokines and stress (1-4). Four isoforms of p38 MAPK, p38α, β, γ (also known as Erk6 or SAPK3), and δ (also known as SAPK4) have been identified. Similar to the SAPK/JNK pathway, p38 MAPK is activated by a variety of cellular stresses including osmotic shock, inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV light, and growth factors (1-5). MKK3, MKK6, and SEK activate p38 MAPK by phosphorylation at Thr180 and Tyr182. Activated p38 MAPK has been shown to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAP kinase 2 (3) and to phosphorylate the transcription factors ATF-2 (5), Max (6), and MEF2 (5-8). SB203580 (4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-imidazole) is a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK. This compound inhibits the activation of MAPKAPK-2 by p38 MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (9). SB203580 inhibits p38 MAPK catalytic activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket, but does not inhibit phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by upstream kinases (10).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-PLCγ1 (Tyr783) (D6M9S) Rabbit mAb #14008.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ, and PLCε. Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulate the activity of PLC. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (2). PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783, and 1248 (3). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (4). PLCγ2 is engaged in antigen-dependent signaling in B cells and collagen-dependent signaling in platelets. Phosphorylation by Btk or Lck at Tyr753, 759, 1197, and 1217 is correlated with PLCγ2 activity (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) is a forkhead box family transcription factor that regulates a number of genes throughout the cell cycle to help control DNA replication, mitosis, and cell proliferation. FoxM1 expression increases during G1 and S and reaches maximum levels in G2/M (1-3). Nuclear translocation occurs just before entry into G2/M and is associated with FoxM1 phosphorylation (4). Phosphorylation of FoxM1 by MAPK (Ser331, Ser704), Cyclin/Cdk (Ser4, Ser35, Thr600, Thr611, Thr620, Thr627, Ser638), Plk1 (Ser715, Ser724), and Chk2 (Ser376) stabilizes and activates FoxM1 (4-8). Forkhead box M1 is expressed in all embryonic tissues but is restricted to proliferating tissues in adults (9). Research studies show that FoxM1 expression is negatively regulated by p53 (10,11). Upregulation of FoxM1 is associated with many human cancers, including prostate, breast, lung, ovary, colon, pancreas, stomach, bladder, liver, and kidney, and may be associated with p53 mutations in some tumors (11,12). As a result, FoxM1 inhibitors have become a topic of interest for potential cancer therapy (13).

$307
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinases (RSK1-4) are a family of widely expressed Ser/Thr kinases characterized by two nonidentical, functional kinase domains (1) and a carboxy-terminal docking site for extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) (2). Several sites both within and outside of the RSK kinase domain, including Ser380, Thr359, Ser363, and Thr573, are important for kinase activation (3). RSK1-3 are activated via coordinated phosphorylation by MAPKs, autophosphorylation, and phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K) in response to many growth factors, polypeptide hormones, and neurotransmitters (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CUB domain containing protein 1 (CDCP1, SIMA135) is a putative stem cell marker shown in research studies to be highly expressed in some human cancer cells and in both typical and atypical (cancerous) colons (1). Expression of CDCP1 may be epigenetically regulated, as methylation of promoter CpG sequences results in decreased CDCP1 expression (2). The corresponding CDCP1 gene encodes a glycoprotein that acts as a complex, multidomain transmembrane antigen. CDCP1 has three extracellular CUB domains that may be involved in cell adhesion or extracellular matrix interactions (1,3). Src-family kinases may phosphorylate CDCP1 at five tyrosine residues within its cytoplasmic domain to provide a potential binding site for SH2 domain-containing proteins (3). CDCP1 is a putative hematopoietic stem cell marker (4,5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated β-Tubulin (9F3) Rabbit mAb #2128.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Cleaved Caspase-3 (Asp175) (D3E9) Rabbit mAb #9579.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Caspase-3 (CPP-32, Apoptain, Yama, SCA-1) is a critical executioner of apoptosis, as it is either partially or totally responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many key proteins, such as the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) (1). Activation of caspase-3 requires proteolytic processing of its inactive zymogen into activated p17 and p12 fragments. Cleavage of caspase-3 requires the aspartic acid residue at the P1 position (2).

$305
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. Akt (pan) (40D4) Mouse mAb (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) is useful for immunoprecipitation assays. The unconjugated Akt (pan) (40D4) Mouse mAb #2920 reacts with human, mouse, rat, and monkey Akt protein. CST expects that Akt (pan) (40D4) Mouse mAb (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) will also recognize Akt in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Optineurin is a signaling protein involved in maintenance of the Golgi complex, membrane trafficking, NF-κB, and interferon signaling. Mutations in the gene encoding optineurin have been associated with human diseases including glaucoma, Paget disease of bone, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (1-2). Optineurin is thought to contribute to these pathologies through regulation of inflammatory signaling, autophagy, and mitophagy (1, 3). The NF-κB-activating kinase/TANK-binding kinase 1 (NAK/TBK1) phosphorylates optineurin at serine 177, regulating optineurin’s role in autophagy and mitophagy (4-6). The tumor suppressor HACE1 ubiquitylates optineurin, promoting the interaction of optineurin with the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1 (7).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-SAMHD1 (Thr592) (D7O2M) Rabbit mAb #89930.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: SAM domain and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) is a negative regulator of the cell-intrinsic innate immune response (1). Research studies have identified mutations in SAMHD1 as a cause of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, an autoimmune disease characterized by elevated production of interferon-α and symptoms resembling congenital viral infection (1). SAMHD1 was identified as the restriction factor that renders most myeloid cells refractory to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (2-4). Expression of the viral protein Vpx in refractory cells targets SAMHD1 for ubiquitin-mediated degradation and relieves HIV restriction. SAMHD1 prevents autoimmunity and HIV infection by hydrolyzing intracellular deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs), thereby limiting inappropriate immune activation by self nucleic acid and inhibiting reverse transcription of the HIV genome (4-6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: A20, also referred to as TNF-α-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), is cytokine-inducible protein that functions to inhibit apoptosis and activate NF-κB (1,2). It was first identified as a TNF-α inducible primary response gene in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and encodes a 790-amino acid protein containing seven Cys2/Cys2-zinc finger motifs (3). Constitutive expression of A20 is observed in lymphoid tissues (4), but it is transiently expressed in a variety of cell types in response to inflammatory signals such as TNF-α (3,5), IL-1 (3,5), phorbol esters (6), and LPS (7). Expression of A20 can confer resistance to apoptosis and NF-κB activation triggered by these signals, probably through interference with TRAF (TNF receptor associated factor) family members (8,9), and interaction with the NF-κB inhibiting protein ABIN (10). Studies also show that A20 contains site-specific ubiquitin modifying activity that can contribute to its biological functions (11,12). The amino-terminus of A20 contains de-ubiquitinating (DUB) activity for Lys63 branches, such as those found in TRAF6 and RIP, while the carboxyl-terminus contains ubiquitin ligase (E3) activity for Lys48 branches of the same substrates and leads to their degradation (12).

The TRAF Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to evaluate endogenous levels of TRAF1, 2, 3, and 6. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western mini-blot experiments.

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DEAD box helicase DDX41 is an antiviral protein that senses cytosolic DNA and activates the signaling adaptor STING to induce type I interferon production (1).  The recognition of bacterial dinucleotides by DDX41 also leads to STING-dependent type 1 interferon production (2).  Research studies demonstrate that knockdown of DDX41 attenuates poly(dA:dT)-induced IFN-β production and cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS, MB21D1) induction (3). The DDX41 protein is thought to be an initial constitutively expressed DNA sensor that activates type I interferon production and leads to cGAS amplification of type I interferon production (3). DDX41 is negatively regulated by the E3 ligase TRIM21 (4). Both germline and somatic mutations in the corresponding DDX41 gene are associated with myeloid neoplasms (5,6). 

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group (HMG) proteins are a superfamily of abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind DNA without sequence specificity and induce structural changes to the chromatin fiber to regulate access to the underlying DNA. The HMGN family of proteins, which includes five members (HMGN1-5), is characterized by the presence of several conserved protein domains: a positively charged domain, a nucleosome binding domain, and an acidic C-terminal chromatin-unfolding domain (1,2). HMGN proteins function in transcriptional regulation and are recruited to gene promoters by transcription factors, such as estrogen receptor α (ERα), serum responsive factor (SRF), and PITX2, where they can facilitate either gene activation or repression (3-5). HMGN proteins bind specifically to nucleosomal DNA and reduce compaction of the chromatin fiber, in part by competing with linker histone H1 for nucleosome binding (6). In addition, HMGN proteins act to modulate local levels of post-translational histone modifications, decreasing phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and histone H2A at Ser1 and increasing acetylation of histone H3 at Lys14 (7-9). HMGN proteins can also modulate the activity of several chromatin-remodeling factors and restrict nucleosome mobility (10).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated GST (91G1) Rabbit mAb #2625.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated by the covalent reaction of hydrazinonicotinamide-modified antibody with formylbenzamide-modified horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Akt (pan) (C67E7) Rabbit mAb #4691.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Guinea Pig, Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The phagocytic NADPH oxidase is a multiprotein enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to superoxide in response to invasion of pathogens into the body. The NADPH oxidase consists of 6 subunits, the membrane-bound p91phox and p22phox heterodimer (also known as cytochrome b558), the cytoplasmic complex of p40phox, p47phox and p67phox, and the small GTPase Rac2. Activation of NADPH oxidase is initiated by phosphorylation of the cytosolic complex, which induces comformational changes of the complex and ultimately leads to the translocation of the cytoplasmic complex to the membrane to form an active enzyme with cytochrome b558 (1). Thr154 and Ser315 of p40 phox have been identified as PKC phosphorylation sites modified during activation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (2).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neural precursor expressed, developmentally down-regulated protein 4 (NEDD4) was originally identified as a gene that is highly expressed in the early mouse embryonic central nervous system (1). Subsequently, a family of NEDD4-like proteins have been defined that includes seven members in humans (2). NEDD4 and NEDD4-like (NEDD4L) proteins contain multiple functional domains including a calcium-dependent phospholipid and membrane binding domain (C2 domain), two to four protein binding domains (WW domains), and an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase domain (HECT domain). NEDD4 and NEDD4L have been shown to downregulate both neuronal voltage-gated Na+ channels (NaVs) and epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs) in response to increased intracellular Na+ concentrations (3,4). The WW domains of NEDD4 bind to PY motifs (amino acid sequence PPXY) found in multiple NaV and ENaC proteins; ubiquitination of these proteins is mediated by the HECT domain of NEDD4 and results in their internalization and removal from the plasma membrane. Research studies have shown that mutation of the PY motifs in ENaC proteins is associated with Liddle's syndrome, an autosomal dominant form of hypertension (5). In addition to targeting sodium channels, NEDD4L has also been shown to negatively regulate TGF-β signaling by targeting Smad2 for degradation (6). Mouse and human NEDD4 are rapidly cleaved by caspase proteins during apoptosis, although the significance of this cleavage is not clear (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tau is a heterogeneous microtubule-associated protein that promotes and stabilizes microtubule assembly, especially in axons. Six isoforms with different amino-terminal inserts and different numbers of tandem repeats near the carboxy terminus have been identified, and tau is hyperphosphorylated at approximately 25 sites by Erk, GSK-3, and CDK5 (1,2). Phosphorylation decreases the ability of tau to bind to microtubules. Neurofibrillary tangles are a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; these tangles are bundles of paired helical filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. In particular, phosphorylation at Ser396 by GSK-3 or CDK5 destabilizes microtubules. Furthermore, research studies have shown that inclusions of tau are found in a number of other neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as tauopathies (1,3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ikaros (D6N9Y) Rabbit mAb #14859.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The Ikaros family of zinc-finger DNA-binding proteins belongs to the Kruppel transcription factor superfamily. Ikaros proteins are characterized by the presence of an amino-terminal zinc finger DNA-binding domain and a carboxy-terminal dimerization domain. Members of the Ikaros family include Ikaros, Aiolos, Helios, EOS, and Pegasus (1). All family members can form homodimers and heterodimers with other members of the Ikaros family. Most also contain multiple isoforms that are generated as a result of differential splicing, with some isoforms behaving in a dominant negative manner upon dimerization (2).Ikaros (IKZF1, LYF1) is the prototypical Ikaros family zinc-finger transcription factor and is expressed abundantly in lymphoid cells. Genetic studies in mice demonstrate that Ikaros is a tumor suppressor that is important for the normal development of B, T, natural killer, and dendritic cells (3,4). Additional studies show that imbalanced expression of different Ikaros isoforms, as well as mutations in the corresponding IKAROS gene, can be associated with a number of hematologic malignancies in humans (2,5,6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Stat1 (D1K9Y) Rabbit mAb #14994.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The Stat1 transcription factor is activated in response to a large number of ligands (1) and is essential for responsiveness to IFN-α and IFN-γ (2,3). Phosphorylation of Stat1 at Tyr701 induces Stat1 dimerization, nuclear translocation, and DNA binding (4). Stat1 protein exists as a pair of isoforms, Stat1α (91 kDa) and the splice variant Stat1β (84 kDa). In most cells, both isoforms are activated by IFN-α, but only Stat1α is activated by IFN-γ. The inappropriate activation of Stat1 occurs in many tumors (5). In addition to tyrosine phosphorylation, Stat1 is also phosphorylated at Ser727 through a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent pathway in response to IFN-α and other cellular stresses (6). Serine phosphorylation may be required for the maximal induction of Stat1-mediated gene activation.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Adherens junctions are dynamic structures that form cell-cell contacts and are important in development, differentiation, tissue integrity, morphology and cell polarity. They are composed of the transmembrane proteins, cadherins, which bind cadherins on adjacent cells in a calcium-dependent manner. On the cytoplasmic side of adherens junctions, the classic model states that cadherins are linked to the cytoskeleton through β- and α-catenin. α-E-catenin is ubiquitously expressed, α-N-catenin is expressed in neuronal tissue, and α-T-catenin is primarily expressed in heart tissue. Research studies have demonstrated that loss of E-cadherin and α-E-catenin occurs during the progression of several human cancers, indicating that the breakdown of adherens junctions is important in cancer progression (reviewed in 1).Research studies also suggest that, rather than acting as a static link between cadherins and actin, α-catenin regulates actin dynamics directly, possibly by competing with the actin nucleating arp2/3 complex (2,3). α-catenin also plays a role in regulating β-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity, affecting differentiation and response to Wnt signaling. α-catenin binds to β-catenin in the nucleus, preventing it from regulating transcription, and levels of both proteins appear to be regulated via proteasome-dependent degradation (4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated HSP90 (C45G5) Rabbit mAb #4877.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The zyxin family of proteins includes LIMD1, ajuba, trip6 and zyxin, each of which contains three LIM domains at the carboxy-terminus. Zyxin family members associate with the actin cytoskeleton and are components of both the cell-cell junction adhesive complex and the integrin-mediated adhesive complex. They shuttle in and out of the nucleus where they may function in transcriptional activation (1).Zyxin is involved in the regulation of mechanical force-induced actin polymerization at focal adhesions (2), and in regulation of adhesion and migration, possibly through recruitment of Ena/VASP proteins to focal adhesions (3). Zyxin interacts with and may regulate the function of the tumor suppressor myopodin, which inhibits tumor growth and metastasis (4).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in monkey cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated p53 (7F5) Rabbit mAb #2527.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).