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Product listing: CCN3 Antibody, UniProt ID P48745 #8767 to 14-3-3 β/α Antibody, UniProt ID P31946 #9636

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CCN3, also named NOV (Nephroblastoma overexressed), belongs to the CCN (Cyr61, Ctgf, NOV) family of proteins. It is a cystine-rich secretory protein that associates with components of the extracellular matrix. Like other CCN family members, CCN3 is capable of mediating diverse biological functions through its four distinct domains, which enable binding to numerous protein partners (1-5).CCN3 modulates bone turnover through various mechanisms and is implicated in the progression of primary bone cancers such as osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma (6-8). Research has shown that CCN3 is also involved in the bone metastasis of melanoma, breast cancer, and prostate cancers (9-11). Recently, CCN3 was reported to play an important role in stem cell renewal (12). CCN3 is normally expressed in both embryonic and adult tissues (13,14). The activity of CCN3 is influenced by post translational modifications and proteolytic cleavage (15,16).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The mammalian Mediator Complex is a multi-subunit protein complex that couples specific transcriptional regulators to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the basal transcription machinery. Interactions between distinct Mediator subunits and transcription factors allow for specific gene regulation (reviewed in 1).Mediator complex interactions control various biological processes, including insulin signaling (2), NF-κB-dependent signaling (3), stem cell pluripotency and self renewal (4,5), and proliferation of colon cancer cells (6,7).CDK8/Cyclin C, along with Med12 and Med13, constitute a subcomplex within the Mediator Complex thought to act as a molecular switch, inhibiting Pol II recruitment and transcription initiation (8,9). Expression of CDK8 abrogates E2F-1-dependent inhibition of β-catenin activity in colon cancer cells (9). High levels of CDK8 coincide with high β-catenin-dependent transcription in colon cancer cells, and their proliferation can be inhibited by suppressing CDK8 expression (8).CDK8 can phosphorylate Ser727 on STAT1, which reduces natural killer (NK) cell toxicity (10,11). As such, inhibitors are being pursued as potential therapeutics to enhance NK cell activity and combat a variety of cancer types (12,13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box (Fox) proteins are a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors defined by the presence of a winged helix DNA binding domain called a Forkhead box (1). In humans, there are over 40 known Fox protein family members, divided into 19 subfamilies, which have evolved to regulate gene transcription in diverse and highly specialized biological contexts throughout development (2). Mutations that disrupt the expression of Fox gene family members have consequently been implicated in a broad array of human disorders, including immunological dysfunction, infertility, speech/language disorders, and cancer (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Puma (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a "BH3-only" Bcl-2 family member originally identified in differential gene expression studies as a p53-inducible gene (1,2). The "BH3-only" family members include Bad, Bid, Bik, Hrk, Bim, and Noxa, all of which contain a BH3 domain but lack other conserved domains, BH1 and BH2, and generally promote apoptosis by binding to and antagonizing anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members through BH3 domain interactions (3). Two BH3-containing proteins are produced from the puma gene, Puma-α and Puma-β, both of which are induced by p53, bind Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, localize to the mitochondria, and promote cytochrome c release and apoptosis (1,2). Puma plays a critical role in the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. Targeted disruption of the puma gene impairs p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression (4-7). Puma knockout mice show defects from multiple apoptotic stimuli, including ionizing irradiation, deregulated c-Myc expression, and cytokine withdrawal (4).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Two related serine/threonine kinases, UNC-51-like kinase 1 and 2 (ULK1, ULK2), were discovered as mammalian homologs of the C. elegans gene UNC-51 in which mutants exhibited abnormal axonal extension and growth (1-4). Both proteins are widely expressed and contain an amino-terminal kinase domain followed by a central proline/serine rich domain and a highly conserved carboxy-terminal domain. The roles of ULK1 and ULK2 in axon growth have been linked to studies showing that the kinases are localized to neuronal growth cones and are involved in endocytosis of critical growth factors, such as NGF (5). Yeast two-hybrid studies found ULK1/2 associated with modulators of the endocytic pathway, SynGAP and syntenin (6). Structural similarity of ULK1/2 has also been recognized with the yeast autophagy protein Atg1/Apg1 (7). Knockdown experiments using siRNA demonstrated that ULK1 is essential for autophagy (8), a catabolic process for the degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (9,10). It appears that Atg1/ULK1 can act as a convergence point for multiple signals that control autophagy (11), and can bind to several autophagy-related (Atg) proteins, regulating phosphorylation states and protein trafficking (12-16).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The bifunctional 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (PFK-2/FBPase or PFKFB) catalyzes the synthesis and degradation of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate and regulates its steady-state level (1,2). Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate activates phosphofructokinase, a rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, by allosteric regulation (1,2). Four different PFKFB isoforms (PFKFB1, PFKFB2, PFKFB3, and PFKFB4) have been identified (1,2). Research studies indicate that amino acids activate PFKFB2 through Akt-dependent phosphorylation at Ser483 on PFKFB2 (3). In addition, androgen increases the expression of PFKFB2 in prostate cancer cells (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: In both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells the misfolding and aggregation of proteins during biogenesis and under conditions of cellular stress are prevented by molecular chaperones (1-3). HSP60 has primarily been known as a mitochondrial protein that is important for folding key proteins after import into the mitochondria (4). Research studies have shown that a significant amount of HSP60 is also present in the cytosol of many cells, and that it is induced by stress, inflammatory and immune responses, and autoantibodies correlated with Alzheimer's, coronary artery diseases, MS, and diabetes (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) catalyzes the production of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate by phosphorylating phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP), and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Growth factors and hormones trigger this phosphorylation event, which in turn coordinates cell growth, cell cycle entry, cell migration, and cell survival (1). PTEN reverses this process, and research studies have shown that the PI3K signaling pathway is constitutively activated in human cancers that have loss of function of PTEN (2). PI3Ks are composed of a catalytic subunit (p110) and a regulatory subunit. Various isoforms of the catalytic subunit (p110α, p110β, p110γ, and p110δ) have been isolated, and the regulatory subunits that associate with p110α, p110β, and p110δ are p85α and p85β (3). In contrast, p110γ associates with a p101 regulatory subunit that is unrelated to p85. Furthermore, p110γ is activated by βγ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sec61 translocon is a channel complex located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane to mediate membrane protein insertion into the organelle (1). There are three components in the complex, Sec61A, Sec61B, and Sec61G (2). Sec61A is the main component of the channel on the ER membrane and directly contacts nascent synthesized polypeptide TMD (transmembrane domain) for insertion (3). Sec61G functions in stablizing the channel (3). In addition to TMD insertion, Sec61 translocon has also been shown to be involved in ER calcium leakage (4,5). Both Bip and calmodulin can inhibit this leakage by their interaction with Sec61A (6,7). Sec61B has no obvious function related to target protein ER membrane insertion, but is involved in other vesicle trafficking processes such as EGFR and Her2 trafficking from the cytosol to nucleus (8,9), Gurken trafficking from Golgi to plasma membrane (10), and copper-transporting ATPase membrane distribution (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Leucine-rich repeat containing 8 family member A (LRRC8A) belongs to the leucine-rich repeat family of proteins. It is also named SWELL1. LRRC8A forms a heteromeric complex called the volume regulated anion channel (VRAC) with other family members such as LRRC8B, LRRC8C, LRRC8D, or LRRC8E. VRAC maintains cell volume in response to extracellular or intracellular osmotic changes (1,2). The LRRC8A-containing VRAC complex senses ionic strength and is activated by hypotonic stress (3). LRRC8A is also involved in B cell development. Mutations in the LRRC8A gene causes agammaglobulinemia, which is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by severely low or absent serum antibodies and circulating B-cells (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The founding members of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) superfamily include pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-1β, and a third protein that acts as an IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA). At least six similar proteins have been recently identified, including a homolog of IL-1RA (IL1F5). The three better-characterized proteins (IL-1a, IL-1b and IL-1RA) are mainly expressed in macrophages, monocytes, and dendritic cells. IL-1a and IL-1b act as potent inflammatory cytokines that help regulate host defense and immune responses (1). Binding of these pro-inflammatory cytokines to an IL-1 receptor recruits adapter proteins (such as IRAK) to the receptor. Phosphorylation of these adaptor proteins promotes downstream signaling cascades associated with the immune response (2). Altered expression of both IL-1a and IL-1b is associated with an extensive list of human disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and various forms of cancer (3,4). IL-1RA acts as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, binding the IL-1 receptor to limit the response to inflammation (5). Because it plays a key role in regulating the inflammatory response, recombinant IL-1RA is a therapeutic agent used in the treatment of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Alternatively, mutation of the corresponding IL-1RA gene may be associated with susceptibility to the development of specific cancers (6).

$260
100 µg
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mre11, originally described in genetic screens from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which mutants were defective in meiotic recombination (1), is a central part of a multisubunit nuclease composed of Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1 (MRN) (2,3). The MRN complex plays a critical role in sensing, processing and repairing DNA double strand breaks. Defects lead to genomic instability, telomere shortening, aberrant meiosis and hypersensitivity to DNA damage (4). Hypomorphic mutations of Mre11 are found in ataxia-telangiectasia-like disease (ATLD), with phenotypes similar to mutations in ATM that cause ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), including a predisposition to malignancy in humans (5). Cellular consequences of ATLD include chromosomal instability and defects in the intra-S phase and G2/M checkpoints in response to DNA damage. The MRN complex may directly activate the ATM checkpoint kinase at DNA breaks (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ceruloplasmin is a copper-binding glycoprotein with ferroxidase activity. It oxidizes Fe2+ to Fe3+, facilitating iron transport across the cell membrane (1). Mutation in Ceruloplasmin causes aceruloplasminemia, an autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism characterized by iron accumulation in the brain as well as visceral organs, resulting in retinal degeneration, diabetes mellitus and neurological disturbances (2,3). Ceruloplasmin level in serum has been explored as a diagnostic marker for Wilson disease and ischemic heart disease (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT; also known as Pre-B cell-enhancing factor PBEF) catalyzes the synthesis of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide and 5-phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP), the rate-limiting step in the NAD biosynthesis pathway starting from nicotinamide (1,2). NAD biosynthesis mediated by NAMPT plays a critical role in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells (3). Both NAMPT inhibitors and activators have been sought for clinical applications (4,5). NAMPT has intra- and extracellular forms (iNAMPT and eNAMPT), and deacetylation of iNAMPT by SIRT1 promotes eNAMPT secretion through a nonclassical secretory pathway (3,6). eNAMPT, independent of its enzymatic activity, can induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in mammary epithelial cells and promote monocyte differentiation into a tumor-supporting M2 macrophage (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic cells contain ATP-driven proton pumps known as vacuolar H+-ATPases (V-ATPases) that acidify intracellular compartments and translocate protons across the plasma membrane (1,2). Intracellular v-ATPases play an important role in endocytosis and intracellular membrane trafficking, while plasma membrane v-ATPases are important in processes such as urinary acidification and bone resorption (1,2). Vacuolar ATPase enzymes are large, heteromultimeric protein complexes with component proteins found in either the V1 peripheral domain or the V0 integral domain (2). The cytoplasmic V1 domain contains a hexamer of A and B catalytic subunits, as well as a number of other protein subunits required for ATPase assembly and ATP hydrolysis. The integral V0 v-ATPase domain exhibits protein translocase activity and is responsible for transport of protons across the membrane (2). Research studies show that the v-ATPases ATP6V0c, ATP6V0d1, ATP6V1A, ATP6V1B2, and ATP6V1D interact with the Ragulator protein complex and are essential for amino acid induced activation of mTORC1 on the surface of lysosomes (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: FoxD3 is a member of the Forkhead Box family and is characterized by a winged-helix DNA-binding structure and the important role it plays in embryonic development (1). This transcriptional regulator is required for the maintenance of pluripotency in the pre-implantation and peri-implantation stages of mouse embryonic development (2) and is also required for trophoblast formation (3). FoxD3 is required for the maintenance of the mammalian neural crest; FoxD3(-/-) mouse embryos fail around the time of implantation with loss of neural crest-derived structures (4). FoxD3 also forms a regulatory network with Oct-4 and NANOG to maintain the pluripotency of ES cells (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Deleted in breast cancer gene 1 protein (DBC1) was originally identified by its localization to a region of chromosome 8p21 that is homozygously deleted in breast cancer (1). DBC1 is a large, nuclear protein with multiple functions in cell survival. It binds directly to the estrogen receptor α (ERα) hormone-binding domain in a ligand-independent manner and may be a key determinant of ligand-independent ERα expression and survival in human breast cancer cells (2). DBC1 can promote p53-mediated apoptosis by binding to and inhibiting the deacetylase activity of SirT1, resulting in increased p53 acetylation levels and activity (3). DBC1 may be an important regulator of heterochromatin formation as it binds SUV39H1 and inhibits its histone methyltransferase activity (4). Caspase-dependent processing activates the pro-apoptotic activity of DBC1 during Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α)-mediated cell death signaling (5). This processing of DBC1 in response to TNF-α is an early event in the onset of apoptosis and results in relocalization of DBC1 to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of the processed, cytoplasmic form of DBC1 results in mitochondrial clustering and matrix condensation and sensitizes cells to TNF-α-mediated apoptosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) catalyzes the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and citruline from L-arginine, oxygen and cofactors. Three family members have been characterized: neuronal NOS (nNOS), which is found primarily in neuronal tissue; inducible NOS (iNOS), which is induced by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharides in the kidney and cardiovascular system; and endothelial NOS (eNOS), which is expressed in blood vessels (1). NO is a messenger molecule with diverse functions throughout the body including the maintenance of vascular integrity, homeostasis, synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation, learning, and memory (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box (Fox) proteins are a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors defined by the presence of a winged helix DNA binding domain called a Forkhead box (1). In humans, there are over 40 known Fox protein family members, divided into 19 subfamilies, which have evolved to regulate gene transcription in diverse and highly specialized biological contexts throughout development (2). Mutations that disrupt the expression of Fox gene family members have consequently been implicated in a broad array of human disorders, including immunological dysfunction, infertility, speech/language disorders, and cancer (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CYLD is a cytoplasmic deubiquitinating enzyme encoded by a tumor suppressor gene altered in individuals diagnosed with cylindromatosis, a genetic condition characterized by benign tumors of skin appendages (1,2). Functional CYLD deubiquitinase regulates inflammation and cell proliferation by down regulating NF-κB signaling through removal of ubiquitin chains from several NF-κB pathway proteins (3,4). CYLD is a negative regulator of proximal events in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and is a critical regulator of natural killer T cell development (5,6). The transcription factor Snail can inhibit CYLD expression, resulting in melanoma cell proliferation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA repair systems operate in all living cells to manage a variety of DNA lesions. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is implemented in cases where bulky helix-distorting lesions occur, such as those brought about by UV and certain chemicals (1). Excision Repair Cross Complementing 1 (ERCC1) forms a complex with ERCC4/XPF, which acts as the 5’ endonuclease required to excise the lesion (2). ERCC1-XPF is also required for repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) (3) and involved in repair of double strand breaks (4). Research studies have shown that expression of ERCC1 is related to survival rate and response to chemotherapeutic drugs in several human cancers including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Pyruvate kinase is a glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. In mammals, the M1 isoform (PKM1) is expressed in most adult tissues (1). The M2 isoform (PKM2) is an alternatively spliced variant of M1 that is expressed during embryonic development (1). Research studies found that cancer cells exclusively express PKM2 (1-3). PKM2 is shown to be essential for aerobic glycolysis in tumors, known as the Warburg effect (1). When cancer cells switch from the M2 isoform to the M1 isoform, aerobic glycolysis is reduced and oxidative phosphorylation is increased (1). These cells also show decreased tumorigenicity in mouse xenografts (1). Recent studies showed that PKM2 is not essential for all tumor cells (4). In the tumor model studied, PKM2 was found to be active in the non-proliferative tumor cell population and inactive in the proliferative tumor cell population (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein containing multiple amino-terminal extracellular Ig-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a short carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domain (1). Alternative splicing generates two isoforms of VCAM-1 (2). The role of VCAM-1 during infection and inflammatory diseases is well characterized. Expression of VCAM-1 is induced in endothelial cells by inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β (1). VCAM-1 on endothelial cells interacts with the integrin VLA-4 (α4β1) on leukocytes to mediate migration of circulating leukocytes from the blood across the endothelium and into tissues (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Heat shock protein (HSP) 27 is one of the small HSPs that are constitutively expressed at different levels in various cell types and tissues. Like other small HSPs, HSP27 is regulated at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels (1). In response to stress, the HSP27 expression increases several-fold to confer cellular resistance to the adverse environmental change. HSP27 is phosphorylated at Ser15, Ser78, and Ser82 by MAPKAPK-2 as a result of the activation of the p38 MAP kinase pathway (2,3). Phosphorylation of HSP27 causes a change in its tertiary structure, which shifts from large homotypic multimers to dimers and monomers (4). It has been shown that phosphorylation and increased concentration of HSP27 modulates actin polymerization and reorganization (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: LINE-1, also known as L1, is a non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposon with hundreds of thousands of copies in the human genome (1, 2). Like all non-LTRs, L1 replicates by target-primed reverse transcription (TPRT) (3). The L1 retrotransposon encodes two proteins critical to this process: ORF1p and ORF2p. ORF2p contributes to endonuclease and reverse transcriptase activity, while ORF1p acts as a nucleic acid chaperone that binds RNA (4-8). Many types of cancers have been shown to have L1 insertions within tumor suppressor genes, disrupting their expression and contributing to tumorigenesis (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ring1A plays a role in polycomb group (PcG) protein function. PcG proteins are critically involved in transcriptional repression of Hox genes during development (1,2). PcG proteins form two distinct complexes: EED-EZH2 and the PRC complex, which is composed of at least Bmi1 and Ring1A/Ring1B. The EZH2-containing complex is responsible for the methylation of H3K27, and the PRC complex ubiquitylates H2A. EZH2 methylation is required prior to PRC ubiquitylation, and both are essential for Hox gene repression (3). It has recently been shown that PcG proteins silence a group of developmentally important regulator genes, referred to as bivalent genes (4). This regulation may be responsible for the ability of stem cells to self renew or switch to differentiate into multipotent progenitors. Aberrant epigenetic silencing by PcG proteins is also thought to be important in tumorigenesis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).