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Product listing: SMYD3 (D2Q4V) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q9H7B4 #12859 to MOB1 Antibody, UniProt ID Q7L9L4 #3863

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SET and MYND domain containing protein 3 (SMYD3) is a member of the SET domain-containing family of protein methyltransferases and is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm (1-3). Several histone substrates have been identified for SMYD3; however, the data is controversial. In one study, SMYD3 has been shown to methylate histone H3 Lys4 (both di- and tri-methylation) and interact with RNA polymerase II to activate transcription (1). A second study has shown that SMYD3 preferentially methylates histone H4 Lys20 and interacts with nuclear receptor corepressor complex (NCOR) to repress transcription (2). A third study has shown that SMYD3 preferentially methylates histone H4 Lys5 (mono-, di-, and tri-methylation) (3). In addition, SMYD3 has been shown to methylate the endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) on Lys831 and stimulate its kinase activity (4). Regardless of the preferred protein substrates, it is clear that SMYD3 functions as an oncogene. Research studies have shown SMYD3 is highly over-expressed in liver, breast, and rectal carcinomas. Over-expression of SMYD3 in multiple cell lines enhances proliferation, adhesion, and migration, while reduced expression results in significant suppression of cell growth (1,5-10). In addition, multiple cancer cell lines express both full length SMYD3 and a cleaved form of SMYD3 lacking the N-terminal 34 amino acids, and the cleaved form shows increased methyltransferase activity toward histone H3 (11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The NF-κB/Rel transcription factors are present in the cytosol in an inactive state complexed with the inhibitory IκB proteins (1-3). Activation occurs via phosphorylation of IκBα at Ser32 and Ser36 followed by proteasome-mediated degradation that results in the release and nuclear translocation of active NF-κB (3-7). IκBα phosphorylation and resulting Rel-dependent transcription are activated by a highly diverse group of extracellular signals including inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines. Kinases that phosphorylate IκB at these activating sites have been identified (8).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and its paralog, the Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites (BORIS), are highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcriptional activation and repression, insulator function, and imprinting control regions (ICRs) (1-4). Although they have divergent amino and carboxy termini, both proteins contain 11 conserved zinc finger domains that work in combination to bind the same DNA elements (1). CTCF is ubiquitously expressed and contributes to transcriptional regulation of cell-growth regulated genes, including c-myc, p19/ARF, p16/INK4A, BRCA1, p53, p27, E2F1, and TERT (1). CTCF also binds to and is required for the enhancer-blocking activity of all known insulator elements and ICRs, including the H19/IgF2, Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome, and Inactive X-Specific Transcript (XIST) anti-sense loci (5-7). CTCF DNA-binding is sensitive to DNA methylation, a mark that determines selection of the imprinted allele (maternal vs. paternal) (1). The various functions of CTCF are regulated by at least two different post-translational modifications. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of CTCF is required for insulator function (8). Phosphorylation of Ser612 by protein kinase CK2 facilitates a switch of CTCF from a transcriptional repressor to an activator at the c-myc promoter (9). CTCF mutations or deletions have been found in many breast, prostate, and Wilms tumors (10,11). Expression of BORIS is restricted to spermatocytes and is mutually exclusive of CTCF (3). In cells expressing BORIS, promoters of X-linked cancer-testis antigens like MAGE-1A are demethylated and activated, but methylated and inactive in CTCF-expressing somatic cells (12). Like other testis specific proteins, BORIS is abnormally expressed in different cancers, such as breast cancer, and has a greater affinity than CTCF for DNA binding sites, detracting from CTCF’s potential tumor suppressing activity (1,3,13,14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: LIM domain-containing protein 1 (LIMD1) is a putative tumor suppressor and adapter/scaffold protein that belongs to the Ajuba family of LIM domain containing proteins. LIM domain containing proteins mediate protein-protein interactions and typically contain a pair of distinct zinc finger domains (1). Research studies indicate that LIMD1 is involved in numerous cellular processes, including inhibition of E2F mediated transcription (2) and negative regulation of the Hippo pathway through influence on YAP phosphorylation state (3,4). Additional studies identify LIMD1 as a hypoxia regulator as it recruits the Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein and the hydroxylase PHD1 to a protein complex that promotes initiation of HIF-1α ubiquitination and degradation (5). Research evidence supporting the role of LIMD1 as a tumor suppressor includes the down regulation of the protein in 80% of lung cancers (6), loss of LIMD1 expression in head and neck cancers (7), and altered subcellular localization in cases of breast cancer (8).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR, LISCH) is an immunoglobulin superfamily member and single pass transmembrane protein that binds the apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) lipoproteins (1). LSR is responsible for the cellular uptake of triacylglyceride-rich lipoproteins and supports lipid distribution between the liver and peripheral tissues (1,2). The LSR protein is expressed at the cell membrane as a heterodimer consisting of α and β subunits, which are produced as alternative splice variants from a single gene (3). Research studies suggest that LSR acts as the host cell surface receptor for multiple Clostridium toxins (4) and participates in the formation of tricellular tight junctions in epithelial cells (5). Additional studies demonstrate that LSR expression is up-regulated in several cancer types, including breast, bladder, and colorectal cancer, which could lead to pro-tumorigenic changes in metabolism (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The ATPase inhibitor factor 1 (ATPIF1) gene encodes a mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor that limits ATP depletion when mitochondrial respiration is impaired (1). ATPIF1 becomes activated following a drop in pH, binding to β-F1-ATPase, thereby inhibiting the hydrolase activity of the H+-ATP synthase (1,2). In addition to its role as an ATP hydrolase, ATPIF1 has also been shown to play a regulatory role in cellular energy metabolism by triggering the induction of aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells resulting in their Warburg phenotype (3,4). Research studies demonstrate that the overexpression of ATPIF1 in several human carcinomas further supports its participation in oncogenesis and provides insight into the altered metabolism of cancer cells, which includes the reprogramming of energetic metabolism toward glycolysis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Voltage gated sodium channels are composed of a large alpha subunit and auxiliary beta subunits. The alpha subunit has 4 homologous domains, with each domain containing 6 transmembrane segments. These segments function as the voltage sensor and sodium permeable pore. Upon change of membrane potential, the sodium channel is activated, which allows sodium ions to flow through (1,2). When associated with beta subunits or other accessory proteins, the alpha subunit is regulated at the level of cell surface expression, kinetics, and voltage dependence (3,4).There are 9 mammalian alpha subunits, named Nav1.1-Nav1.9 (5). These alpha subunits differ in tissue specificity and biophysical functions (6,7). Seven of these subunits are essential for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in the central and peripheral nervous system while Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 are mainly expressed in skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle (8,9). Mutations in these alpha channel subunits have been identified in patients with epilepsy, seizure, ataxia, sensitivity to pain, and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10).

The Vimentin Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to detect total levels of vimentin, vimentin phosphorylated at Ser56, and vimentin phosphorylated at Ser82. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: p38 MAP kinase (MAPK), also called RK (1) or CSBP (2), is the mammalian orthologue of the yeast HOG kinase that participates in a signaling cascade controlling cellular responses to cytokines and stress (1-4). Four isoforms of p38 MAPK, p38α, β, γ (also known as Erk6 or SAPK3), and δ (also known as SAPK4) have been identified. Similar to the SAPK/JNK pathway, p38 MAPK is activated by a variety of cellular stresses including osmotic shock, inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV light, and growth factors (1-5). MKK3, MKK6, and SEK activate p38 MAPK by phosphorylation at Thr180 and Tyr182. Activated p38 MAPK has been shown to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAP kinase 2 (3) and to phosphorylate the transcription factors ATF-2 (5), Max (6), and MEF2 (5-8). SB203580 (4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-imidazole) is a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK. This compound inhibits the activation of MAPKAPK-2 by p38 MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (9). SB203580 inhibits p38 MAPK catalytic activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket, but does not inhibit phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by upstream kinases (10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Arrestin proteins function as negative regulators of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Cognate ligand binding stimulates GPCR phosphorylation, which is followed by binding of arrestin to the phosphorylated GPCR and the eventual internalization of the receptor and desensitization of GPCR signaling (1). Four distinct mammalian arrestin proteins are known. Arrestin 1 (also known as S-arrestin) and arrestin 4 (X-arrestin) are localized to retinal rods and cones, respectively. Arrestin 2 (also known as β-arrestin 1) and arrestin 3 (β-arrestin 2) are ubiquitously expressed and bind to most GPCRs (2). β-arrestins function as adaptor and scaffold proteins and play important roles in other processes, such as recruiting c-Src family proteins to GPCRs in Erk activation pathways (3,4). β-arrestins are also involved in some receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways (5-8). Additional evidence suggests that β-arrestins translocate to the nucleus and help regulate transcription by binding transcriptional cofactors (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: IFN-γ plays key roles in both the innate and adaptive immune response. IFN-γ activates the cytotoxic activity of innate immune cells, such as macrophages and NK cells (1,2). IFN-γ production by NK cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs) promotes cell-mediated adaptive immunity by inducing IFN-γ production by T lymphocytes, increasing class I and class II MHC expression, and enhancing peptide antigen presentation (1). The anti-viral activity of IFN-γ is due to its induction of PKR and other regulatory proteins. Binding of IFN-γ to the IFNGR1/IFNGR2 complex promotes dimerization of the receptor complexes to form the (IFNGR1/IFNGR2)2 -IFN-γ dimer. Binding induces a conformational change in receptor intracellular domains and signaling involves Jak1, Jak2, and Stat1 (3). The critical role of IFN-γ in amplification of immune surveillance and function is supported by increased susceptibility to pathogen infection by IFN-γ or IFNGR knockout mice and in humans with inactivating mutations in IFNGR1 or IFNGR2. IFN-γ also appears to have a role in atherosclerosis (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: There are four major Adrenergic Receptor (AR) subtypes (α1, α2, β1, β2). Each of the subtypes has been classified by their unique responses to agonists and antagonists. Adrenergic receptors belong to the family of guanine nucleotide-binding, regulatory protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) which transverse the plasma membrane seven times. The transmembrane regions are hydrophobic and are interconnected by hydrophilic loops (1). β2-Adrenergic Receptor (β2AR) is the most studied receptor of the catecholamine system. β2AR stimulation occurs through the catecholamines epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) acting as neuromodulators in the central nervous system and as hormones in the vascular system. β2AR activation results in coupling to heterotrimeric G proteins and activation of the second messengers cAMP and phosphatidylinositol, ultimately leading to changes in cellular physiology. GPCR kinases (GRKs) terminate β2AR signaling through phosphorylation of the GPCR and by recruiting β-arrestin. β-arrestin binding uncouples the receptor from the G protein, thereby terminating G protein–mediated signaling (desensitization), and initiating clathrin-mediated endocytosis (internalization) of β2AR (2). β-adrenergic blocking agents (beta blockers) are drugs that block catecholamines from binding to βAR and are prescribed for cardiac arrhythmias, cardioprotection after myocardial infarction (heart attack), and hypertension (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 (Eps8) is an adaptor protein and can be phosphorylated by several receptor tyrosine kinases including EGFR and Src (1,2). Eps8 is composed of an N-terminal PTB domain, followed by an SH3 domain and a C-terminal effector domain. Eps8 controls actin-based motility by capping the barbed end of actin and bundling actin subunits through its C-terminal effector domain (3,4). The C-terminal α hexlical structure of Eps8 interacts directly with actin to exert these capping and bundling functions (5). The actin capping activity requires the release of Eps8 autoinhibitory binding through SH3 domain interaction with an adaptor molecule, such as Abi-1 (6). This SH3 domain of Eps8 also binds to RN-tre to regulate the down stream Rab5-mediated endocytosis pathway (6). Eps8 functions by binding several receptor tyrosine kinases, such as EGFR or FGFR, to enhance receptor mediated mitogenic Rac signaling and Rab5 endocytosis (6,7). The effector region of Eps8 is necessary for this process. By association with Abi-1 and forming the Eps8/Abi-1/Sos-1 complex, Eps8 couples initial growth factor stimulation to actin motility and the Rac activation pathway (8,9). Eps8 has been shown to be important in the cellular function of filopodial protrusions, cell migration, microvilli formation, and focal adhesion (10-13). Research studies have demonstrated that through its involvement in actin related cellular functions, Eps8 plays a role in cancer cell growth, survival, motility, and invasiveness (14-18).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) consist of α, β and γ subunits and mediate the effects of hormones, neurotransmitters, chemokines, and sensory stimuli. To date, over 20 known Gα subunits have been classified into four families, Gα(s), Gα(i/o), Gα(q) and Gα(12), based on structural and functional similarities (1,2). Phosphorylation of Tyr356 of Gα(q)/Gα(11) is essential for activation of the G protein, since phenylalanine substitution for Tyr356 changes the interaction of Gα with receptors and abolishes ligand-induced IP3 formation (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Musashi-1 and Musashi-2 are RNA-binding proteins which play a role in asymmetric cell division of ectodermal precursor cells by regulating the translation of target mRNA. Both family members augment Notch signaling and repress the translation of m-Numb, a protein that positively modulates differentiation of neural stem cells into neurons. Thus, Musashi contributes to the maintenance of neural stem cells (1). While Musashi-1 is frequently used as a marker for proliferating neural precursor cells, it is also expressed in epithelial stem cells including intestinal and mammary gland stem cells (2-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The origin recognition complex (ORC) is a highly conserved heterohexameric protein complex that associates with DNA at or near initiation of DNA replication sites. All six ORC subunits are essential for initiation of DNA replication (1-3), and ORC may be involved in regulation of gene expression in response to stress (4). ORC binding to DNA permits the ordered binding of other proteins such as cdc6 and MCMs to form pre-replication complexes (Pre-RCs). Pre-RCs form between telophase and early G1 phase of the cell cycle and are inactivated at the onset of DNA synthesis, allowing coordinated regulation of DNA replication and cell division (5). Modification of one or more of the six ORC subunits may be responsible for its inactivation during S phase, but the chromatin binding behavior of the ORC subunits during the cell division cycle is still under investigation (6-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Mutations in Doublecortin cause Lissencephaly (smooth brain), a neuronal migration disorder characterized by epilepsy and mental retardation (1). Doublecortin is a microtubule associated protein that stabilizes and bundles microtubules. A conserved doublecortin domain mediates the interaction with microtubules, and interestingly most missense mutations cluster in this domain (2). Kinases JNK, CDK5 and PKA phosphorylate doublecortin. JNK phosphorylates Thr321, Thr331 and Ser334 while PKA phosphorylates Ser47 and CDK5 phosphorylates Ser297 (3-5). Phosphorylation of Ser297 lowers the affinity of doublecortin to microtubules. Furthermore, mutations of Ser297 result in migration defects (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Upf1 was identified as an active component in nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), an mRNA surveillance mechanism in eukaryotic cells that degrades mRNAs containing premature termination codons (1). Upf1 was found to be an ATP-dependent RNA helicase in the cytoplasm (2) and was later shown to be a component of cytoplasmic P-bodies (3). Upf1 phosphorylation mediates the repression of translation that accompanies NMD, allowing mRNA accessibility to the NMD machinery (4). Two other active components of NMD, Upf2 and Upf3, were also identified and described as having perinuclear and nucleocytoplasmic localization, respectively (5).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is an important factor in the repair of double-stranded breaks in DNA. Cells lacking DNA-PK or in which DNA-PK is inhibited fail to show proper nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (1-7). DNA-PK is composed of two DNA-binding subunits (Ku70 and Ku86) and one 450 kDa catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) (8). It is thought that a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku86 binds to double-stranded DNA broken ends before DNA-PKcs binds and is activated (1,9). Activated DNA-PKcs is a serine/threonine kinase that has been shown to phosphorylate a number of proteins in vitro, including p53, transcription factors, RNA polymerase, and Ku70/Ku86 (10,11). DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation at multiple sites, including Thr2609 and Ser2056, results in an inactivation of DNA-PK kinase activity and NHEJ ability (12,13). It has been demonstrated, however, that DNA-PK preferentially phosphorylates substrates before it autophosphorylates, suggesting that DNA-PK autophosphorylation may play a role in disassembly of the DNA repair machinery (14,15). Autophosphorylation at Thr2609 has also been shown to be required for DNA-PK-mediated double strand break repair, and phosphorylated DNA-PK co-localizes with H2A.X and 53BP1 at sites of DNA damage (16). Phosphorylation at Ser2056 occurs in response to double-stranded DNA breaks and ATM activation (17).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Casein Kinase I (CK1 or CKI) is the name given to a family of kinases consisting of multiple isoforms (α, α', β, γ1-3, δ, and ε) with a conserved N-terminal kinase domain and a variable C-terminal sequence that determines subcellular localization and regulates enzyme activity (1-3). Indeed, multiple inhibitory autophosphorylation sites have been identified near the C terminus of CK1ε (3). This ubiquitously expressed family of protein kinases has been implicated in multiple processes including DNA repair, cell morphology, and Wnt signaling (4). Perhaps the best understood role of CK1 is to provide the priming phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser45 to produce the consensus GSK-3 substrate motif (S/T-X-X-X-pS) (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: B cell linker protein (BLNK), also known as SLP-65 or BASH, is an adaptor molecule that plays key roles in B cell activation and B cell antigen receptor (BCR) engagement. BLNK acts at the interface between BCR-associated Syk and downstream signaling cascades (1,2). BLNK has multiple SH2 binding motifs (YXXP) at its amino terminus and an SH2 domain at its carboxy terminus. After BCR ligation, BLNK is phosphorylated by Syk at multiple YXXP motifs including Tyr72, Tyr84, Tyr96, and Tyr178 (1). These phosphorylated motifs provide docking sites for signaling molecules, such as BTK, PLCγ, and Vav. These signaling molecules bind to BLNK through their SH2 domains and together activate downstream signaling pathways (3,4). Through its SH2 domain, BLNK can also interact with tyrosine-phosphorylated targets, such as HPK1, thereby recruiting them to the BCR complex for signaling (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TBK1 (TANK-binding kinase 1)/NAK (NF-κB activating kinase) is an IκB kinase (IKK)-activating kinase and can activate IKK through direct phosphorylation (1). TBK1 was identified through association with the TRAF binding protein, TANK, and found to function upstream of NIK and IKK in the activation of NF-κB (2). TBK1 induces IκB degradation and NF-κB activity through IKKβ. TBK1 may mediate IKK and NF-κB activation in response to growth factors that stimulate PKCε activity (1). TBK1 plays a pivotal role in the activation of IRF3 in the innate immune response (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: FAF1 was originally identified though yeast two-hybrid screening, interacting with the cytoplasmic domain of Fas, a member of the TNF receptor superfamily that plays a critical role in in apoptosis during development and immune function (1). FAF1 is widely expressed with highest expression observed in testis, skeletal muscle and heart (2). FAF1 potentiates Fas-mediated apoptosis and may induce apoptosis without Fas stimulation in some cell types. It does not contain typical death motifs, but rather has two amino-terminal domains with structural homology to ubiquitin. While the precise role of FAF1 during apoptosis is still unclear, it has been observed to be one of the components of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) during Fas-mediated apoptosis and can bind to caspase-8 and FADD (3). FAF1 has also been shown to suppress the activation of the NF-kappaB transcription factor (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondrial Rho GTPase 1 (Miro1, RHOT1) and mitochondrial Rho GTPase 2 (Miro2, RHOT2) are atypical Ras GTPase proteins that localize to the outer mitochondrial membrane (1,2). These evolutionarily conserved proteins contain GTP-binding domains and a pair of calcium-binding EF hand domains (1,2). Research studies indicate that Miro1 and Miro2 function in the axonal transport of mitochondria in neurons (2). Both Miro proteins play an essential role in mitochondrial trafficking by attaching mitochondria to essential motor and adaptor proteins (3). Miro GTPase proteins that are anchored to the outer mitochondrial membrane interact with kinesin-binding proteins TRAK1 and TRAK2 to provide a link between mitochondria to microtubules (4). Increased levels of synaptic calcium appears to inhibit mitochondrial trafficking mediated by Miro, suggesting a role for the EF hand as a calcium sensor (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: R-Ras, a member of the small GTPase family, is homologous to H-, K- and N-Ras, but does not activate MAP kinase pathways and is only weakly oncogenic (1). Instead, R-Ras is engaged in integrin activation (2). The effector loop and the carboxy-terminal proline-rich and prenylation sites of R-Ras are critical for integrin activation (3,4). Phosphorylation by EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase and Src at Tyr66 of R-Ras suppresses integrin activity (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, CCN2) belongs to the CCN (CYR61, CTGF, NOV) family of secreted extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (1). Members of this family contain four conserved cysteine-rich domains, and interact in the ECM with a diverse array of cell surface receptors, including integrins and heparin-sulfate proteoglycans (2). These interactions regulate a multitude of cellular and tissue functions, including adhesion, proliferation, migration, differentiation, senescence, angiogenesis, inflammation, and wound repair (1, 3-5). The CTGF gene is a transcriptional target of both YAP/TAZ and TGFβ-SMAD signaling pathways (6,7), and aberrant regulation of CTGF expression is strongly associated with pathological conditions, notably cancer and fibrosis (8, 9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cohesin complex consists of a heterodimer between SMC1 (SMC1A or B) and SMC3, bound by additional RAD21 and STAG proteins (STAG1, 2, or 3) (1,2). These proteins form a ring-like structure that mediates the cohesion of two sister chromatids after DNA replication in S phase (1,2). RAD21 and STAG2 are phosphorylated by Polo-like kinase (PLK) during prophase, which leads to the dissociation of cohesin complexes from the chromosome arms; however, cohesin remains bound to centromeres until anaphase (3,4). RAD21 is cleaved by separin/ESPL1 in anaphase, which leads to dissociation of the remaining cohesin from centromeres, enabling sister chromatids to segregate during mitosis (5). RAD21 is also cleaved by caspase-3 and caspase-7 during apoptosis, resulting in a 64 kDa carboxy-terminal cleavage product that translocates to the cytoplasm and may help to trigger apoptosis (6,7). In addition to mediating cohesion of sister chromatids, the cohesin complex plays important roles in gene regulation and DNA repair, as SMC1 and SMC3 are both phosphorylated by ATM and ATR kinases upon DNA damage (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MOB1 was first identified in yeast as a protein that binds to Mps with essential roles in the completion of mitosis and the maintenance of ploidy (1). Its Drosophila and mammalian homologs, Mats and MOB1, respectively, are involved in the Hippo signaling tumor suppressor pathway, which plays a critical role in organ size regulation and which has been implicated in cancer development (2-5). There are two MOB1 proteins in humans, MOB1α and MOB1β, that are encoded by two different genes but which have greater than 95% amino acid sequence identity (6). Both forms bind to members of the nuclear Dbf2-related (NDR) kinases, such as LATS1/2 and NDR1/2, thereby stimulating kinase activity (7-9). This binding is promoted by the phosphorylation of MOB1 at several threonine residues by MST1 and/or MST2 (5,10).