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Product listing: JNK2 (56G8) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P45983 #9258 to Hexokinase I (C35C4) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P19367 #2024

$111
20 µl
$260
200 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The stress-activated protein kinase/Jun-amino-terminal kinase SAPK/JNK is potently and preferentially activated by a variety of environmental stresses including UV and gamma radiation, ceramides, inflammatory cytokines, and in some instances, growth factors and GPCR agonists (1-6). As with the other MAPKs, the core signaling unit is composed of a MAPKKK, typically MEKK1-MEKK4, or by one of the mixed lineage kinases (MLKs), which phosphorylate and activate MKK4/7. Upon activation, MKKs phosphorylate and activate the SAPK/JNK kinase (2). Stress signals are delivered to this cascade by small GTPases of the Rho family (Rac, Rho, cdc42) (3). Both Rac1 and cdc42 mediate the stimulation of MEKKs and MLKs (3). Alternatively, MKK4/7 can be activated in a GTPase-independent mechanism via stimulation of a germinal center kinase (GCK) family member (4). There are three SAPK/JNK genes each of which undergoes alternative splicing, resulting in numerous isoforms (3). SAPK/JNK, when active as a dimer, can translocate to the nucleus and regulate transcription through its effects on c-Jun, ATF-2, and other transcription factors (3,5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ikaros (D6N9Y) Rabbit mAb #14859.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The Ikaros family of zinc-finger DNA-binding proteins belongs to the Kruppel transcription factor superfamily. Ikaros proteins are characterized by the presence of an amino-terminal zinc finger DNA-binding domain and a carboxy-terminal dimerization domain. Members of the Ikaros family include Ikaros, Aiolos, Helios, EOS, and Pegasus (1). All family members can form homodimers and heterodimers with other members of the Ikaros family. Most also contain multiple isoforms that are generated as a result of differential splicing, with some isoforms behaving in a dominant negative manner upon dimerization (2).Ikaros (IKZF1, LYF1) is the prototypical Ikaros family zinc-finger transcription factor and is expressed abundantly in lymphoid cells. Genetic studies in mice demonstrate that Ikaros is a tumor suppressor that is important for the normal development of B, T, natural killer, and dendritic cells (3,4). Additional studies show that imbalanced expression of different Ikaros isoforms, as well as mutations in the corresponding IKAROS gene, can be associated with a number of hematologic malignancies in humans (2,5,6).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Olfactomedin-4 (OLFM4, hGC-1) is a member of the Olfactomedin family, a small group of extracellular proteins defined by the presence of a conserved "Olfactomedin domain" that is thought to facilitate protein-protein interactions (1). OLFM4 is a secreted glycoprotein, which forms disulfide bond-mediated oligomers, and is thought to mediate cell adhesion through its interactions with extracellular matrix proteins such as lectins (2). Human OLFM4 was first cloned from myeloid cells (3) and is expressed in a distinct subset of neutrophils, though the functional significance of this differential expression pattern remains unclear (4). Among normal tissues, the expression of OLFM4 protein is most abundant in intestinal crypts (5), where it has garnered attention as a possible marker of intestinal stem cells (6). Notably, OLFM4 expression is markedly increased in several tumor types, including colorectal, gastric, pancreas, lung, and breast (reviewed in [1]). Furthermore, research studies show that the expression levels of OLFM4 vary in relation to the severity and/or differentiation status of multiple tumor types (1, 6-8), leading to the suggestion that OLFM4 may have utility as a prognostic marker in some cancer patients (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SHP-1 (PTPN6) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase that is expressed primarily in hematopoietic cells. The enzyme is composed of two SH2 domains, a tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domain, and a carboxy-terminal regulatory domain (1). SHP-1 removes phosphates from target proteins to downregulate several tyrosine kinase-regulated pathways. In hematopoietic cells, the amino-terminal SH2 domain of SHP-1 binds to tyrosine phosphorylated erythropoietin receptors (EpoR) to negatively regulate hematopoietic growth (2). Overexpression of SHP-1 in epithelial cells results in dephosphorylation of the Ros receptor tyrosine kinase and subsequent downregulation of Ros-dependent cell proliferation and transformation (3). Following ligand binding in myeloid cells, SHP-1 associates with the IL-3R β chain and downregulates IL-3-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and cell proliferation (4). Because SHP-1 downregulates various proliferation pathways, SHP-1 is considered a potential tumor suppressor and angiogenesis regulator (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Antiviral innate immunity depends on the combination of parallel pathways triggered by virus detecting proteins in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family and RNA helicases, such as Rig-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) and MDA-5 (melanoma differentiation-associated antigen 5), which promote the transcription of type I interferons (IFN) and antiviral enzymes (1-3). TLRs and helicase proteins contain sites that recognize the molecular patterns of different virus types, including DNA, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and glycoproteins. These antiviral proteins are found in different cell compartments; TLRs (i.e. TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9) are expressed on endosomal membranes and helicases are localized to the cytoplasm. Rig-I expression is induced by retinoic acid, LPS, IFN, and viral infection (4,5). Both Rig-I and MDA-5 share a DExD/H-box helicase domain that detects viral dsRNA and two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARD) that are required for triggering downstream signaling (4-7). Rig-I binds both dsRNA and viral ssRNA that contains a 5'-triphosphate end not seen in host RNA (8,9). Though structurally related, Rig-I and MDA-5 detect a distinct set of viruses (10,11). The CARD domain of the helicases, which is sufficient to generate signaling and IFN production, is recruited to the CARD domain of the MAVS/VISA/Cardif/IPS-1 mitochondrial protein, which triggers activation of NF-κB, TBK1/IKKε, and IRF-3/IRF-7 (12-15).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2) are activated by ligands binding to a number of associated cytokine receptors (1). Upon cytokine receptor activation, Jak proteins become autophosphorylated and phosphorylate their associated receptors to provide multiple binding sites for signaling proteins. These associated signaling proteins, such as Stats (2), Shc (3), insulin receptor substrates (4), and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (5), typically contain SH2 or other phospho-tyrosine-binding domains.

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: CD11c (integrin αX, ITGAX) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that forms an α/β heterodimer with CD18 (integrin β2), which interacts with a variety of extracellular matrix molecules and cell surface proteins (1). CD11c is primarily used as a dendritic cell marker. Dendritic cells can be classified into two major types: CD11c+ conventional dendritic cells that specialize in antigen presentation, and CD11c- plasmacytoid dendritic cells that specialize in type I interferon production (2, 3). CD11c expression has also been observed on activated NK cells, subsets of B cells, monocytes, granulocytes, and some B cell malignancies including hairy cell leukemia (4-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 is a well documented mechanism of downregulating protein synthesis under a variety of stress conditions. Kinases activated by viral infection (PKR), endoplasmic reticulum stress (PERK/PEK), amino acid deprivation (GCN2) and hemin deficiency (HRI) can phosphorylate the alpha subunit of eIF2 (1,2). GCN2 is also required for UV-light induced translation inhibition, and in vivo phosphorylation of murine GCN2 at Thr898 is induced by both UV irradiation and by leucine deprivation (3). UV-induced activation of NF-kappaB also requires GCN2, which may act simply by preventing translation of IkappaB-alpha to replace pools that have been ubiquitinated and degraded (4). Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors (MG132 and ALLN) activate the GCN2/eIF2alpha pathway, suggesting a pivotal role for this kinase in stress response and ubiquitin-mediated signaling (5). In vitro autophosphorylation of yeast GCN2 within its activation loop at Thr882 and Thr887 (Thr898 and Thr903 in mouse) has also been reported (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant of the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The three members of the UTX/UTY family include the ubiquitously transcribed X chromosome tetratricopeptide repeat protein (UTX), the ubiquitously transcribed Y chromosome tetratricopeptide repeat protein (UTY) and JmjC domain-containing protein 3 (JMJD3) (3). This family of proteins has been shown to demethylate both di- and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys 27 (4-8). The UTX gene escapes X inactivation in females and is ubiquitously expressed (9). UTX functions to regulate HOX gene expression during development (4-6). JMJD3 functions to regulate gene expression in macrophages responding to various inflammatory stimuli and has been shown to be upregulated in prostate cancer (7,8). Both UTX and JMJD3 interact with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) complexes 2 and 3, both of which have been shown to methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (6,7). The UTY gene is expressed in most tissues in the male mouse (10).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cathepsin B (CSTB), part of the papain family of proteases, is a widely expressed lysosomal cysteine endopeptidase (1,2). Cathepsin B is produced from a larger precursor form, pro-cathepsin B, which runs at approximately 44 kDa on SDS-PAGE, and is proteolytically processed and glycosylated to form a mature two-chain protein containing a heavy chain (running at 27 and 24 kDa) and a light chain (5 kDa). High levels of cathepsin B are found in macrophages and osteoclasts, as well as various types of cancer cells, including lung, colon, prostate, breast, and stomach. In addition, expression of cathepsin B has been associated with multiple sclerosis (3), rheumatoid arthritis (4), and pancreatitis (5). While generally localized to lysosomes, in cancer alterations can lead to its secretion (6). Its role in tumor progression is thought to involve promotion of basement membrane degradation, invasion and metastasis (7,8). Expression can correlate with poor prognosis for a variety of forms of cancer (9-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmit TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, and 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved carboxy terminal SSXS motif. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad (Smad4), allowing translocation of the complex to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), ubiquitously expressed and located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, is generally thought to be the primary means by which metabolites diffuse in and out of the mitochondria (1). In addition, this channel plays a role in apoptotic signaling. The change in mitochondrial permeability characteristic of apoptosis is mediated by Bcl-2 family proteins, which bind to VDAC, altering the channel kinetics (2). Homodimerization of VDAC may be a mechanism for changing mitochondrial permeability and supporting release of cytochrome c (3). In mammalian cells, there are three VDAC isoforms, VDAC1, which is the most widely expressed isoform, as well as VDAC2 and VDAC3 (4,5).

$135
1 ml
Affinity purified goat anti-biotin antibody is conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. This product has been optimized to detect biotinylated protein markers.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Chemiluminescence systems have emerged as the best all-around method for western blot detection. They eliminate the hazards associated with radioactive materials and toxic chromogenic substrates. The speed and sensitivity of these methods are unequalled by traditional alternatives, and because results are generated on film, it is possible to record and store data permanently. Blots detected with chemiluminescent methods are easily stripped for subsequent reprobing with additional antibodies. HRP-conjugated secondary antibodies are utilized in conjunction with specific chemiluminescent substrates to generate the light signal. HRP conjugates have a very high turnover rate, yielding good sensitivity with short reaction times.

Cell Cycle Regulation Antibody Sampler kit offers an economical way of detecting eight integral cell cycle regulation proteins. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Eukaryotic cell cycle progression is dependent, in part, on the tightly regulated activity of cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). Cyclin D/CDK4/6 activity occurs in mid-late G1 phase, upstream of CDK2/cyclin E activity. Both of these activities are required for hyperphosphorylation of the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb). pRb phosphorylation allows the release of S phase-promoting transcription factors and is indicative of the cell's commitment to proliferate. This point in the cell cycle is known as the restriction point. Cyclin protein levels oscillate throughout the cell cycle, and their availability is a means of controlling CDK activity and cell proliferation. Cyclin D is degraded through the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in the absence of mitogenic signaling. Ubiquitination of cyclin D1 is enhanced by phosphorylation at Thr286 by glycogen synthase kinase 3b (GSK-3b) (1). p27/Kip1, p57 Kip2 and p21 Waf1/Cip1 are members of the Cip/Kip family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. They form heterotrimeric complexes with cyclins and CDKs, inhibiting kinase activity and blocking progression through G1/S phase (2). However, p21 may enhance assembly and activity of cyclin D/CDK4/6 complexes (3). Levels of p21 and p27 protein are controlled through ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (4). Levels of p27 are upregulated in quiescent cells and in cells treated with negative cell cycle regulators. p27 nuclear localization is controlled by Akt-dependent phosphorylation at Thr157 (5). The inhibitors of CDK4 (INK4) family include p15 INK4B, p16 INK4A, p18 INK4C, and p19 INK4D. All INK4 proteins selectively inhibit CDK4/6 activity, either in a binary complex, or in a ternary complex including cyclin D, resulting in inhibition of cell division (6,7).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76) is a hematopoietic adaptor protein that is important in multiple biochemical signaling pathways and necessary for T cell development and activation (1). ZAP-70 phosphorylates SLP-76 and LAT as a result of TCR ligation. SLP-76 has amino-terminal tyrosine residues followed by a proline rich domain and a carboxy-terminal SH2 domain. Phosphorylation of Tyr113 and Tyr128 result in recruitment of the GEF Vav and the adapter protein Nck (2). TCR ligation also leads to phosphorylation of Tyr145, which mediates an association between SLP-76 and Itk, which is accomplished in part via the proline rich domain of SLP-76 and the SH3 domain of ITK (3). Furthermore, the proline rich domain of SLP-76 binds to the SH3 domains of Grb2-like adapter Gads (3,4). In resting cells, SLP-76 is predominantly in the cytosol. Upon TCR ligation, SLP-76 translocates to the plasma membrane and promotes the assembly of a multi-protein signaling complex that includes Vav, Nck, Itk and PLCγ1 (1). The expression of SLP-76 is tightly regulated; the protein is detected at very early stages of thymocyte development, increases as thymocyte maturation progresses, and is reduced as cells mature to CD4+ CD8+ double-positive thymocytes (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 21 kDa guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (K-Ras, H-Ras, and N-Ras) cycle between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) forms (1). Receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors activate Ras, which then stimulates the Raf-MEK-MAPK pathway (2-4). GTPase-activating proteins (GAP) normally facilitate the inactivation of Ras. However, research studies have shown that in 30% of human tumors, point mutations in Ras prevent the GAP-mediated inhibition of this pathway (5). The most common oncogenic Ras mutation found in tumors is Gly12 to Asp12 (G12D), which prevents Ras inactivation, possibly by increasing the overall rigidity of the protein (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cytochrome c is a well conserved electron-transport protein and is part of the respiratory chain localized to mitochondrial intermembrane space (1). Upon apoptotic stimulation, cytochrome c released from mitochondria associates with procaspase-9 (47 kDa)/Apaf 1. This complex processes caspase-9 from inactive proenzyme to its active form (2). This event further triggers caspase-3 activation and eventually leads to apoptosis (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunofluorescence (Paraffin), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factor EB (TFEB) is a member of the Myc-related, bHLH leucine-zipper family of transcription factors that drives the expression of a network of genes known as the Coordinated Lysosomal Expression and Regulation (CLEAR) network (1,2). TFEB specifically recognizes and binds regulatory sequences within the CLEAR box (GTCACGTGAC) of lysosomal and autophagy genes, resulting in the up-regulated expression of genes involved in lysosome biogenesis and function, and regulation of autophagy (1,2). TFEB is activated in response to nutrient deprivation, stimulating translocation to the nucleus where it forms homo- or heterooligomers with other members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MiTF) subfamily and resulting in up-regulation of autophagosomes and lysosomes (3-5). Recently, it has been shown that TFEB is a component of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1), which regulates the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of TFEB in response to cellular starvation and stress (6-9). During normal growth conditions, TFEB is phosphorylated at Ser211 in an mTORC1-dependent manner. Phosphorylation promotes association of TFEB with 14-3-3 family proteins and retention in the cytosol. Inhibition of mTORC1 results in a loss of TFEB phosphorylation, dissociation of the TFEB/14-3-3 complex, and rapid transport of TFEB to the nucleus where it increases transcription of CLEAR and autophagy genes (10). TFEB has also been shown to be activated in a nutrient-dependent manner by p42 MAP kinase (Erk2). TFEB is phosphorylated at Ser142 by Erk2 in response to nutrient deprivation, resulting in nuclear localization and activation, and indicating that pathways other than mTOR contribute to nutrient sensing via TFEB (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The NF-κB/Rel transcription factors are present in the cytosol in an inactive state, complexed with the inhibitory IκB proteins (1-3). Most agents that activate NF-κB do so through a common pathway based on phosphorylation-induced, proteasome-mediated degradation of IκB (3-7). The key regulatory step in this pathway involves activation of a high molecular weight IκB kinase (IKK) complex whose catalysis is generally carried out by three tightly associated IKK subunits. IKKα and IKKβ serve as the catalytic subunits of the kinase and IKKγ serves as the regulatory subunit (8,9). Activation of IKK depends upon phosphorylation at Ser177 and Ser181 in the activation loop of IKKβ (Ser176 and Ser180 in IKKα), which causes conformational changes, resulting in kinase activation (10-13).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Fos family of nuclear oncogenes includes c-Fos, FosB, Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1), and Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) (1). While most Fos proteins exist as a single isoform, the FosB protein exists as two isoforms: full-length FosB and a shorter form, FosB2 (Delta FosB), which lacks the carboxy-terminal 101 amino acids (1-3). The expression of Fos proteins is rapidly and transiently induced by a variety of extracellular stimuli including growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, polypeptide hormones, and stress. Fos proteins dimerize with Jun proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) to form Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), a transcription factor that binds to TRE/AP-1 elements and activates transcription. Fos and Jun proteins contain the leucine-zipper motif that mediates dimerization and an adjacent basic domain that binds to DNA. The various Fos/Jun heterodimers differ in their ability to transactivate AP-1 dependent genes. In addition to increased expression, phosphorylation of Fos proteins by Erk kinases in response to extracellular stimuli may further increase transcriptional activity (4-6). Phosphorylation of c-Fos at Ser32 and Thr232 by Erk5 increases protein stability and nuclear localization (5). Phosphorylation of FRA1 at Ser252 and Ser265 by Erk1/2 increases protein stability and leads to overexpression of FRA1 in cancer cells (6). Following growth factor stimulation, expression of FosB and c-Fos in quiescent fibroblasts is immediate, but very short-lived, with protein levels dissipating after several hours (7). FRA1 and FRA2 expression persists longer, and appreciable levels can be detected in asynchronously growing cells (8). Deregulated expression of c-Fos, FosB, or FRA2 can result in neoplastic cellular transformation; however, Delta FosB lacks the ability to transform cells (2,3).

$115
20 µl
$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: When T cells encounter antigens via the T cell receptor (TCR), information about the quantity and quality of antigens is relayed to the intracellular signal transduction machinery (1). This activation process depends mainly on CD3 (Cluster of Differentiation 3), a multiunit protein complex that directly associates with the TCR. CD3 is composed of four polypeptides: ζ, γ, ε and δ. Each of these polypeptides contains at least one immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) (2). Engagement of TCR complex with foreign antigens induces tyrosine phosphorylation in the ITAM motifs and phosphorylated ITAMs function as docking sites for signaling molecules such as ZAP-70 and p85 subunit of PI-3 kinase (3,4). TCR ligation also induces a conformational change in CD3ε, such that a proline region is exposed and then associates with the adaptor protein Nck (5).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) (Thr202/Tyr204) (197G2) Rabbit mAb #4377.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a widely conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in many cellular programs, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, and death. The p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) signaling pathway can be activated in response to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli including mitogens, growth factors, and cytokines (1-3), and research investigators consider it an important target in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer (4). Upon stimulation, a sequential three-part protein kinase cascade is initiated, consisting of a MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK or MAP3K), a MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK or MAP2K), and a MAP kinase (MAPK). Multiple p44/42 MAP3Ks have been identified, including members of the Raf family, as well as Mos and Tpl2/COT. MEK1 and MEK2 are the primary MAPKKs in this pathway (5,6). MEK1 and MEK2 activate p44 and p42 through phosphorylation of activation loop residues Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr185/Tyr187, respectively. Several downstream targets of p44/42 have been identified, including p90RSK (7) and the transcription factor Elk-1 (8,9). p44/42 are negatively regulated by a family of dual-specificity (Thr/Tyr) MAPK phosphatases, known as DUSPs or MKPs (10), along with MEK inhibitors, such as U0126 and PD98059.

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated EpCAM (VU1D9) Mouse mAb #2929.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Epithelial cell adhesion and activating molecule (EpCAM/CD326) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions on the basolateral surface of most epithelial cells. EpCAM is not expressed in adult squamous epithelium, but it is highly expressed in adeno and squamous cell carcinomas (1). Research studies identified EpCAM as one of the first tumor-associated antigens, and it has long been a marker of epithelial and tumor tissue. Investigators have shown that EpCAM is highly expressed in cancer cells (reviewed in 2,3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) is a forkhead box family transcription factor that regulates a number of genes throughout the cell cycle to help control DNA replication, mitosis, and cell proliferation. FoxM1 expression increases during G1 and S and reaches maximum levels in G2/M (1-3). Nuclear translocation occurs just before entry into G2/M and is associated with FoxM1 phosphorylation (4). Phosphorylation of FoxM1 by MAPK (Ser331, Ser704), Cyclin/Cdk (Ser4, Ser35, Thr600, Thr611, Thr620, Thr627, Ser638), Plk1 (Ser715, Ser724), and Chk2 (Ser376) stabilizes and activates FoxM1 (4-8). Forkhead box M1 is expressed in all embryonic tissues but is restricted to proliferating tissues in adults (9). Research studies show that FoxM1 expression is negatively regulated by p53 (10,11). Upregulation of FoxM1 is associated with many human cancers, including prostate, breast, lung, ovary, colon, pancreas, stomach, bladder, liver, and kidney, and may be associated with p53 mutations in some tumors (11,12). As a result, FoxM1 inhibitors have become a topic of interest for potential cancer therapy (13).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-1, or interleukin-1ß converting enzyme (ICE/ICEα), is a class I cysteine protease, which also includes caspases -4, -5, -11, and -12. Caspase-1 cleaves inflammatory cytokines such as pro-IL-1ß and interferon-γ inducing factor (IL-18) into their mature forms (1,2). Like other caspases, caspase-1 is proteolytically activated from a proenzyme to produce a tetramer of its two active subunits, p20 and p10. Caspase-1 has a large amino-terminal pro-domain that contains a caspase recruitment domain (CARD). Overexpression of caspase-1 can induce apoptosis (3). Mice deficient in caspase-1, however, have no overt defects in apoptosis but do have defects in the maturation of pro-IL-1β and are resistant to endotoxic shock (4,5). At least six caspase-1 isoforms have been identified, including caspase-1 α, β, γ, δ, ε and ζ (6). Most caspase-1 isoforms (α, β, γ and δ) produce products between 30-48 kDa and induce apoptosis upon over-expression. Caspase-1 ε typically contains only the p10 subunit, does not induce apoptosis and may act as a dominant negative. The widely expressed ζ isoform of caspase-1 induces apoptosis and lacks 39 amino-terminal residues found in the α isoform (6). Activation of caspase-1 occurs through an oligomerization molecular platform designated the "inflammasome" that includes caspase-5, Pycard/Asc, and NALP1 (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Hexokinase catalyzes the conversion of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate, the first step in glycolysis. Four distinct mammalian hexokinase isoforms, designated as hexokinase I, II, III, and IV (glucokinase), have been identified. Hexokinases I, II, and III are associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane and are critical for maintaining an elevated rate of aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells (Warburg Effect) (1) in order to compensate for the increased energy demands associated with rapid cell growth and proliferation (2,3).