Dropping with the temps: Cool deals on CST mAbs | Learn More >>

Product listing: Phospho-Met (Tyr1234/1235) Blocking Peptide, UniProt ID P08581 #1645 to PHLDA3 Antibody, UniProt ID Q9Y5J5 #4294

This peptide is used to block Phospho-Met (Tyr1234/1235) (D26) Rabbit mAb #3077 reactivity in western and dot blot protocols.

Background: Met, a high affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, also known as scatter factor) is a disulfide-linked heterodimer made of 45 kDa α- and 145 kDa β-subunits (1,2). The α-subunit and the amino-terminal region of the β-subunit form the extracellular domain. The remainder of the β-chain spans the plasma membrane and contains a cytoplasmic region with tyrosine kinase activity. Interaction of Met with HGF results in autophosphorylation at multiple tyrosines, which recruit several downstream signaling components, including Gab1, c-Cbl, and PI3 kinase (3). These fundamental events are important for all of the biological functions involving Met kinase activity. The addition of a phosphate at cytoplasmic Tyr1003 is essential for Met protein ubiquitination and degradation (4). Phosphorylation at Tyr1234/1235 in the Met kinase domain is critical for kinase activation. Phosphorylation at Tyr1349 in the Met cytoplasmic domain provides a direct binding site for Gab1 (5). Research studies have shown that altered Met levels and/or tyrosine kinase activities are found in several types of tumors, including renal, colon, and breast. Thus, investigators have concluded that Met is an attractive potential cancer therapeutic and diagnostic target (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The zinc finger protein ZPR1 (ZNF259) binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and is localized to both cytoplasm and nucleus. The zinc fingers found in ZPR1 and the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR mediate the interaction between ZPR1 and the receptor (1). ZPR1 translocates from the cytoplasm to nucleus following mitogen (i.e. EGF) stimulation (2,3). ZPR1 also interacts with translation elongation factor eEF1A in vivo following EGF treatment (3). The interaction between the zinc finger protein and elongation factor is important for cell proliferation. Cells lacking ZPR1 exhibit abnormal nucleolar function, suggesting that ZPR1 is required for cell viability and nucleolar function in dividing cells (3). ZPR1 knockout mice exhibit significant neurodegeneration, and reduced or altered expression of ZPR1 may contribute to spinal muscular atrophy, a disorder characterized by degeneration of spinal cord neurons (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of PKC is one of the earliest events in a cascade leading to a variety of cellular responses such as secretion, gene expression, proliferation and muscle contraction (1,2). Protein kinase D (PKD), also called PKCμ, is a serine/threonine kinase whose activation is dependent on the phosphorylation of two activation loop sites, Ser744 and Ser748, via a PKC-dependent signaling pathway (3-5). In addition to the two activation loop sites, the carboxy-terminal Ser916 has been identified as an autophosphorylation site for PKD/PKCμ. Phosphorylation at Ser916 correlates with PKD/PKCμ catalytic activity (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Retinoids (vitamin A and its active retinoic acid derivatives) are non-steroid hormones that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Retinoic acid receptors (RARalpha, -beta and -gamma) and retinoid X receptors (RXRalpha, -beta and -gamma) are nuclear receptors that function as RAR-RXR heterodimers or RXR homodimers (1-2). In response to retinoid binding, these dimers control gene expression by binding to specific retinoic acid response elements, by recruiting cofactors and the transcriptional machinery, and by indirectly regulating chromatin structure. Finally, ligand binding and phosphorylation of RARalpha by JNK at Thr181, Ser445 and Ser461 controls the stability of RAR-RXR through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (3-4). At least four distinct genetic lesions affect RARalpha and result in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The t(15;17) translocation that results in the PML-RARalpha fusion protein is responsible for more than 99% of APL cases, and the fusion protein inhibits PML-dependent apoptotic pathways in a dominant negative fashion. In addition PML-RARalpha inhibits transcription of retinoic acid target genes by recruiting co-repressors, attenuating myeloid differentiation (5-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Naked1 (Nkd1) and Naked2 (Nkd2) are homologs of Drosophila Naked cuticle, a negative regulator of Wnt/Wingless signaling pathway which functions through a feedback mechanism (1,2). Both Drosophila and vertebrate Naked proteins contain a putative calcium-binding EF-hand motif, however, Drosophila Naked binds to zinc instead of calcium (3). Naked inhibits the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway by binding to Dishevelled proteins and directs Dishevelled activity towards the planar cell polarity pathway (2,4). Naked1 is a direct target of Wnt signaling and is overexpressed in some colon tumors due to constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway (5). Naked2 is myristoylated and is required for sorting of TGF-α to the basolateral plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cripto, also known as teratocarcinoma derived growth factor 1 (TDGF-1), belongs to the EGF-CFC family of proteins. Members of this family are characterized by an N-terminal signal peptide, a conserved cysteine rich domain (CFC motif), and a short hydrophobic carboxy-terminal tail that contains GPI cleavage and attachment sites. The GPI moiety anchors Cripto and family members to the extracellular plasma membrane (1). An O-linked fucosylation site within the EGF-like motif is required for Cripto and related family members to perform their function as co-receptors for TGF-β-related ligands such as Nodal and Vg1/GDF1 (2,3). Soluble forms of Cripto can be produced - these contain intact EGF and CFC domains, and are thought to have paracrine activities, as opposed to the autocrine activity of Cripto functioning as a coreceptor (4). Understanding of this paracrine activity is not complete, but it is proposed that Cripto may act as co-ligand for Nodal (3).Cripto is an important modulator of embryogenesis and oncogenesis (4). It is highly expressed in early embryos, and in embryonic stem (ES) cells where it is involved in cardiomyocytic differentiation and acts as a negative regulator of neurogenesis (5-7). Transient activation of Cripto is essential for the capacity of stem cell self-renewal and pluripotency in ES cells, and in some adult derived stem cells (8). Signaling through Cripto can also stimulate other activities that promote tumorigenesis such as stimulation of proliferation, cell motility, invasion, angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) (9-11). Cripto is highly expressed in a broad range of tumors, where it acts as a potent oncogene.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ERC1, an acronym named for previous protein names ELKS (1), RAB6IP2 (2) and CAST (3), is a RIM-binding protein that plays a role in neurotransmitter release and general membrane trafficking in other cell types (2-5). Interaction with the GTP-binding protein Rab6 suggests that it contributes to membrane traffic at the Golgi (2). In addition to its association with membrane trafficking, ERC1 has also been found as an essential part of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex required for the activation of NF-κB, perhaps by recruiting IκBα to the IKK complex (6). Alternative splicing of ERC1 generates 2 proteins with a divergent carboxy terminus, a long and a short form termed ERC1α and ERC1β, respectively. ERC1α is widely expressed, whereas ERC1β and a related family member ERC2 are expressed in the brain (4). Papillary thyroid carcinomas have been identified with the translocation t(10;12)(p11;p13) resulting in a fusion between ERC1 and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Postsynaptic Density Protein 93 (PSD93) is a member of the PSD subfamily of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (PSD-MAGUK) proteins. Structurally, it most closely resembles PSD95, consisting of an N-terminal variable segment followed by three PDZ domains, an SH3 domain, and an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain (1,2). PSD93 is expressed in neuronal cells and located at the synapse where it interacts with neuronal receptors and proteins including the NMDA receptor (2-4), K+ channels (5,6), and the AMPA receptor (7) to regulate their membrane localization and neuronal signaling. Research studies have implicated PSD93 in postsynaptic related persistent pain induction, making PSD93 a potential target for treatment of this syndrome (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is a platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) that catalyzes the formation of thymine and 2-deoxy-D-ribose-1-phosphate from thymidine and orthophosphate (1). This intracellular enzyme is capable of both promoting angiogenesis and inhibiting apoptosis. Thymidine phosphorylase catalytic activity is required for its angiogenic function (2,3). Increased expression of TP/PD-ECGF is seen in a wide variety of different solid tumors and inflammatory diseases and is often associated with poor prognosis (4,5). Alternatively, TP can activate fluorouracil derivative (DFUR) prodrugs and increase the antitumor activity of the related treatment (1,5). The use of thymidine phosphorylase as a cancer therapeutic target has been studied extensively, with emphasis on either inhibiting TP enzymatic activity or increasing enzyme induction with concomitant DFUR treatment (1,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) are a family of transcription factors critical for cellular differentiation, terminal functions and inflammatory response (1). Six members of the family have been characterized (C/EBPα, -β, -γ, -δ, -ε and -ζ) and are distributed in a variety of tissues (1). There are two forms of C/EBPβ, the 38 kDa liver activating protein (LAP) and the 20 kDa liver inhibitory protein (LIP) which may be products of alternative translation. The 38 kDa LAP protein is a transcriptional activator while LIP may act as an inhibitor of C/EBPβ transcriptional activity (2). Phosphorylation of C/EBPβ at distinct sites stimulates its transcriptional activity (3-5). Phosphorylation at serine 105 of rat C/EBPβ, a unique site only present in the rat sequence, seems essential for rat C/EBPβ activation (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: p70 S6 kinase is a mitogen activated Ser/Thr protein kinase downstream of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) and the target of rapamycin, FRAP/mTOR. p70 S6 kinase is required for cell growth and cell cycle progression (1,2). SKAR is a recently discovered substrate of S6K1. SKAR exists in two isoforms, α and β, the latter having a 29 amino acid truncation. Phosphorylation of SKAR is mitogen-induced and sensitive to rapamycin. Reduction in SKAR protein levels results in decreased cell size, further implicating SKAR in cell growth control (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The NDK/NME/NM23 kinase family (encoded by the NME gene family) consists of at least eight distinct proteins that exhibit different cellular localization (1). Members of this group inhibit metastasis in a variety of tumor cell types (2). All NDK/NME/NM23 proteins possess nucleoside diphosphatase kinase (NDK) activity and catalyze the phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphate to the corresponding nucleoside triphosphate to regulate a diverse array of cellular events (3). At least four classes of NDK biochemical activities have been described, including protein-protein interactions (4-6), regulation of GTP-binding protein function (7-9), DNA-associated activities (10,11), and histidine-dependent protein phosphotransferase activity (12). NDK/NME proteins participate in the regulation of a broad spectrum of cellular responses, including development, differentiation, proliferation, endocytosis, and apoptosis (13). Because of its role in metastasis suppression and oncogenesis, NDKA (NME1/NM23-H1) has been widely studied (14). NDKA (NM23-H1) and NDKB (NM23-H2) are encoded by adjacent NME1 and NME2 genes and share 90% sequence identity. Two serine residues (Ser122 and Ser144) on NDKA/NM23-H1 can be phosphorylated by AMPKα1, but only phosphorylation at Ser122 determines whether NDKA channels ATP to AMPKα1. This regulates AMPKα1 activity towards ACC1, an important regulator of fatty acid metabolism (15). Mutation of NDKB/NM23-H2 at Ser122 (S122P) in melanoma cells results in altered phosphoryl transfer activity (16).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SGTA, small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein A, is an ubiquitously expressed co-chaperone that binds directly to HSC70 and HSP70 and regulates their ATPase activity (1,2). SGTA is a 34 kDa protein that is rich in glutamine residues at its C terminus and contains three tandemly repeated TPR motifs (3). The TPR domain of SGTA shows sequence similarity to the TPR domains of Hop, CHIP, and TOM70 (4). The TPR domain of SGTA also interacts with HSP90 and was recently found to be a pro-apoptotic factor (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF1 or EBP-50) is one of several related PDZ domain-containing proteins (1). NHERF1 was first identified as a necessary cofactor for cyclic AMP-associated inhibition of Na+/ H+ exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) (2). NHERF1 is a multifunctional adaptor protein that interacts with receptors and ion transporters via its PDZ domains, and with the ERM family of proteins, including merlin, via its carboxy-terminus (2,3). NHERF1 may play an important role in breast cancer. Estrogen has been found to induce NHERF1 in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells (2,3). Furthermore, NHERF1 has been shown to bind to PDGFR, which is activated in breast carcinomas. NHERF1 has been found to promote the formation of a ternary complex containing PTEN, NHERF1, and PDGFR. Therefore, NHERF1 may function to recruit PTEN to PDGFR to inhibit the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling in normal cells; this mechanism may be disrupted in cancer (4). NHERF1 also binds to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which functions as an ion channel and has disease-causing mutations in cystic fibrosis (5). Other proposed functions of NHERF1 include testicular differentiation, endosomal recycling, membrane targeting, protein sorting, and trafficking (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CDC37 is an important component of the HSP90 chaperone complex (1,2). It was initially identified for its involvement in cell-cycle progression and was later found to have a much broader role as a chaperone for a wide variety of kinases and other proteins (1-3). CDC37 protein has an amino-terminal kinase binding domain followed by a central HSP90 binding domain. It recruits and stabilizes kinases in the HSP90 complex by protecting the newly synthesized kinase peptide chain from degradation and promoting the next step of protein maturation (4,5). CDC37 also suppresses the ATPase activity of HSP90, thereby leading to conformational changes in the complex that preclude target kinase loading (6). CDC37 has been proposed as a therapeutic target because of its important role in multiple kinase pathways involved in proliferation and cancer cell survival, including Raf, Akt, Src, and ErbB2 pathways (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CDC37 is an important component of the HSP90 chaperone complex (1,2). It was initially identified for its involvement in cell-cycle progression and was later found to have a much broader role as a chaperone for a wide variety of kinases and other proteins (1-3). CDC37 protein has an amino-terminal kinase binding domain followed by a central HSP90 binding domain. It recruits and stabilizes kinases in the HSP90 complex by protecting the newly synthesized kinase peptide chain from degradation and promoting the next step of protein maturation (4,5). CDC37 also suppresses the ATPase activity of HSP90, thereby leading to conformational changes in the complex that preclude target kinase loading (6). CDC37 has been proposed as a therapeutic target because of its important role in multiple kinase pathways involved in proliferation and cancer cell survival, including Raf, Akt, Src, and ErbB2 pathways (7,8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor for pleiotrophin (PTN), a growth factor involved in embryonic brain development (1-3). In ALK-expressing cells, PTN induces phosphorylation of both ALK and the downstream effectors IRS-1, Shc, PLCγ, and PI3 kinase (1). ALK was originally discovered as a nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK fusion protein produced by a translocation (4). Investigators have found that the NPM-ALK fusion protein is a constitutively active, oncogenic tyrosine kinase associated with anaplastic lymphoma (4). Research literature suggests that activation of PLCγ by NPM-ALK may be a crucial step for its mitogenic activity and involved in the pathogenesis of anaplastic lymphomas (5).A distinct ALK oncogenic fusion protein involving ALK and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein like 4 (EML4) has been described in the research literature from a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, with corresponding fusion transcripts present in some cases of lung adenocarcinoma. The short, amino-terminal region of the microtubule-associated protein EML4 is fused to the kinase domain of ALK (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: p70 S6 kinase is a mitogen activated Ser/Thr protein kinase downstream of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) and the target of rapamycin, FRAP/mTOR. p70 S6 kinase is required for cell growth and cell cycle progression (1,2). SKAR is a recently discovered substrate of S6K1. SKAR exists in two isoforms, α and β, the latter having a 29 amino acid truncation. Phosphorylation of SKAR is mitogen-induced and sensitive to rapamycin. Reduction in SKAR protein levels results in decreased cell size, further implicating SKAR in cell growth control (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PPIG belongs to a highly conserved class of cyclophilins that function as peptidyl-prolyl-isomerases (PPIases) to catalyze the conversion of cis-proline to trans-proline in a polypeptide chain (1-4). PPIG contains an amino-terminal cyclophilin domain followed by Nopp140 repeats that are involved in its function as a nuclear chaperone (5). The carboxy-terminal of PPIG contains a SR (arginine-serine dipeptide repeat) domain (3,4) that is involved in pre-mRNA splicing and processing (6). PPIG interacts with the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II as well as several other SR family splicing factors. These interactions lead to changes in localization and conformation and suggest a regulatory role in transcription and pre-mRNA splicing in the elongating RNA polymerase complex (7,8). PPIG is found in the nuclear matrix and nuclear speckles and is involved in the regulation of gene expression. PPIG shows a predominantly diffuse cytoplasmic distribution at the onset of mitosis, and in late telophase the isomerase is recruited to the newly formed nuclei (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian sterile-20-like (MST) kinases are upstream regulators of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways that regulate multiple cellular processes, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and cytoskeletal rearrangement (1). This family of serine/threonine kinases includes MST1 (STK4) and MST2 (STK3), two functionally related proteins with conserved amino-terminal kinase domains and carboxy-terminal regulatory domains that contain nuclear export signals (1-3). During apoptosis, caspase-mediated cleavage of MST1/2 removes the inhibitory regulatory domain, triggering autophosphorylation and activation of the kinase domain, which is translocated to the nucleus. Nuclear translocation of the active kinase induces chromatin condensation and other events associated with apoptotic progression (4).Research studies indicate that MST1/2 are orthologous to Drosophila Hippo (Hpo), one of the core regulatory proteins in the Hippo signaling pathway. This evolutionarily conserved program controls tissue growth and organ size by regulating cell proliferation, apoptosis, and stem cell self-renewal. The mammalian Hippo signaling pathway involves a kinase cascade, where the MST1/2 kinases and the SAV1 scaffold protein form a complex that leads to phosphorylation and activation of LATS1/2. The LATS1/2 kinases phosphorylate YAP and TAZ, promoting cytoplasmic sequestration and inhibition of these transcription coactivators (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: THEX1 (3’hExo) is a 3’ exonuclease that may play a role in the degradation of histone mRNA transcripts (1). A recently identified member of the DEDDh 3' exonuclease family, THEX1 binds the conserved stem-loop structure found at the 3’ end of mRNA in vitro (2). The binding of THEX1 to mRNA requires the presence of a terminal ACCCA sequence and is enhanced by the concurrent binding of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP). Cleavage of histone mRNA by THEX1 exonuclease may help produce the rapid turnover of histone mRNA transcripts associated with the completion of DNA replication (3). Additional evidence suggests that THEX1 may be responsible for excising the remaining few 3’ nucleotides following cleavage by a different enzyme (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: THEX1 (3’hExo) is a 3’ exonuclease that may play a role in the degradation of histone mRNA transcripts (1). A recently identified member of the DEDDh 3' exonuclease family, THEX1 binds the conserved stem-loop structure found at the 3’ end of mRNA in vitro (2). The binding of THEX1 to mRNA requires the presence of a terminal ACCCA sequence and is enhanced by the concurrent binding of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP). Cleavage of histone mRNA by THEX1 exonuclease may help produce the rapid turnover of histone mRNA transcripts associated with the completion of DNA replication (3). Additional evidence suggests that THEX1 may be responsible for excising the remaining few 3’ nucleotides following cleavage by a different enzyme (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: THEX1 (3’hExo) is a 3’ exonuclease that may play a role in the degradation of histone mRNA transcripts (1). A recently identified member of the DEDDh 3' exonuclease family, THEX1 binds the conserved stem-loop structure found at the 3’ end of mRNA in vitro (2). The binding of THEX1 to mRNA requires the presence of a terminal ACCCA sequence and is enhanced by the concurrent binding of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP). Cleavage of histone mRNA by THEX1 exonuclease may help produce the rapid turnover of histone mRNA transcripts associated with the completion of DNA replication (3). Additional evidence suggests that THEX1 may be responsible for excising the remaining few 3’ nucleotides following cleavage by a different enzyme (4).

$364
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. Phospho-Met (Tyr1234/1235) (D26) XP® Rabbit mAb (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) is useful for the immunoprecipitation assays.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: Met, a high affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, also known as scatter factor) is a disulfide-linked heterodimer made of 45 kDa α- and 145 kDa β-subunits (1,2). The α-subunit and the amino-terminal region of the β-subunit form the extracellular domain. The remainder of the β-chain spans the plasma membrane and contains a cytoplasmic region with tyrosine kinase activity. Interaction of Met with HGF results in autophosphorylation at multiple tyrosines, which recruit several downstream signaling components, including Gab1, c-Cbl, and PI3 kinase (3). These fundamental events are important for all of the biological functions involving Met kinase activity. The addition of a phosphate at cytoplasmic Tyr1003 is essential for Met protein ubiquitination and degradation (4). Phosphorylation at Tyr1234/1235 in the Met kinase domain is critical for kinase activation. Phosphorylation at Tyr1349 in the Met cytoplasmic domain provides a direct binding site for Gab1 (5). Research studies have shown that altered Met levels and/or tyrosine kinase activities are found in several types of tumors, including renal, colon, and breast. Thus, investigators have concluded that Met is an attractive potential cancer therapeutic and diagnostic target (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 25 kDa synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP25) is a target membrane soluble, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (t-SNARE) that is found on neuronal presynaptic membranes. SNAP25 forms a core complex with the SNARE proteins syntaxin and synaptobrevin to mediate synaptic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane during Ca2+-dependent exocytosis (1). This complex is responsible for exocytosis of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Neurotransmitter release is inhibited by proteolysis of SNAP25 by botulinum toxins A and E (2). SNAP25 plays a secondary role as a Q-SNARE involved in endosome fusion; the protein is associated with genetic susceptibility to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Jak-Stat signaling pathway is utilized by a large number of cytokines, growth factors, and hormones (1). Receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak family members triggers phosphorylation of Stat proteins, resulting in their nuclear translocation, binding to specific DNA elements, and subsequent activation of transcription. The remarkable range and specificity of responses regulated by the Stats is determined, in part, by the tissue-specific expression of different cytokine receptors, Jaks, and Stats, as well as by the combinatorial coupling of various Stat members to different receptors (2). Stat4 is predominantly expressed in the spleen, thymus, and testis and has been most extensively investigated as the mediator of IL-12 responses (3-8). Activation of Stat4 is associated with phosphorylation at Tyr693 (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Ras family small GTPase Ran is involved in nuclear envelope formation, assembly of the mitotic spindle, and nuclear transport (1,2). Like other small GTPases, Ran is active in its GTP-bound form and inactive in its GDP-bound form. Nuclear RanGTP concentration is maintained through nuclear localization of guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity, which catalyzes the exchange of bound GDP for GTP. Regulator of chromatin condensation 1 (RCC1) is the only known RanGEF (3). RCC1 is dynamically chromatin-bound throughout the cell cycle, and this localization is required for mitosis to proceed normally (4,5). Appropriate association of RCC1 with chromatin is regulated through amino-terminal phosphorylation (5,6) and methylation (7). RCC1 regulation of RanGTP levels in response to histone modifications regulates nuclear import during apoptosis (8). In mitosis RCC1 is phosphorylated at Ser11, possibly by cyclin B/cdc2 (9-11). This phosphorylation may play a role in RCC1 interaction with chromatin and RCC1 RanGEF activity (6).

$327
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. Tri-Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys27) (C36B11) Rabbit mAb (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) is useful for the immunoprecipitation of tri-methyl-histone H3 (Lys27). The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Tri-Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys27) (C36B11) Rabbit mAb #9733.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 3 (PHLDA3) is one of three relatively small, similar proteins that share a common pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Expression of PHLDA3 and the related PHLDA1 occurs in several fetal and adult tissues, in contrast to the more restricted expression of PHLDA2 seen in mouse tissues (1). PHLDA3 is one of several proteins induced following treatment of tumor cells with cisplatin, an anti-cancer drug that cross-links DNA and promotes apoptosis through activation of the tumor suppressor p53 (2). Additional evidence that PHLDA3 is involved in promoting apoptosis through p53 came from a study examining the opposing effects of p53 and Akt in tumor development. Tumor suppressor p53 binds the PHLDA3 promoter to induce transcription. Induced overexpression of PHLDA3 increases apoptosis while deletion of PHLDA3 results in increased Akt activity and a reduction in p53-mediated apoptosis. PHLDA3 appears to compete with the PH domain of Akt, preventing Akt activation and promotion of Akt-induced cell survival pathways (3).