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Product listing: Geminin (E5Q9S) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID O75496 #52508 to EOMES (E4Z4X) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID O95936 #73379

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells is a highly coordinated process that ensures duplication of the genome only once per cell division cycle. Origins of replication are dispersed throughout the genome and their activities are regulated via the sequential binding of pre-replication and replication factors. The origin recognition complex (ORC) is thought to be bound to chromatin throughout the cell cycle (1,2). The pre-replication complex (pre-RC) forms in late mitosis/early G1 phase beginning with the binding of CDT1 and cdc6 to the origin, which allows binding of the heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex. Once this complex is formed, the origin is “licensed” for initiation of DNA replication. In order to ensure that replication occurs only once per cell cycle, geminin binds to and inhibits CDT1 during the S, G2 and M phases. This prevents the recruitment of the MCM complex to the origins of replication, which blocks the premature reformation of the Pre-RC. At the metaphase/anaphase transition, geminin is degraded by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) allowing for the formation of new pre-RC (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The aldehyde dehydrogenase family is a large group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidization of aldehydes into carboxylic acids (1). Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A2 (ALDH1A2, RALHD2) is among a group of aldehyde dehydrogenases that catalyze the metabolism of retinaldehyde into retinoic acid (RA), which plays a critically important signaling role in animal development (2). Research studies have shown that ALDH1A2 also plays a role postnatally in modulating the effects of RA signaling on immune cell function (3-5). In one example using a genetic mouse model, it was shown that ALDH1A2-dependent RA signaling was a downstream mediator of NOTCH-dependent T cell differentiation (6).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated c-Raf (D4B3J) Rabbit mAb #53745.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: A-Raf, B-Raf, and c-Raf (Raf-1) are the main effectors recruited by GTP-bound Ras to activate the MEK-MAP kinase pathway (1). Activation of c-Raf is the best understood and involves phosphorylation at multiple activating sites including Ser338, Tyr341, Thr491, Ser494, Ser497, and Ser499 (2). p21-activated protein kinase (PAK) has been shown to phosphorylate c-Raf at Ser338, and the Src family phosphorylates Tyr341 to induce c-Raf activity (3,4). Ser338 of c-Raf corresponds to similar sites in A-Raf (Ser299) and B-Raf (Ser445), although this site is constitutively phosphorylated in B-Raf (5). Inhibitory 14-3-3 binding sites on c-Raf (Ser259 and Ser621) can be phosphorylated by Akt and AMPK, respectively (6,7). While A-Raf, B-Raf, and c-Raf are similar in sequence and function, differential regulation has been observed (8). Of particular interest, B-Raf contains three consensus Akt phosphorylation sites (Ser364, Ser428, and Thr439) and lacks a site equivalent to Tyr341 of c-Raf (8,9). Research studies have shown that the B-Raf mutation V600E results in elevated kinase activity and is commonly found in malignant melanoma (10). Six residues of c-Raf (Ser29, Ser43, Ser289, Ser296, Ser301, and Ser642) become hyperphosphorylated in a manner consistent with c-Raf inactivation. The hyperphosphorylation of these six sites is dependent on downstream MEK signaling and renders c-Raf unresponsive to subsequent activation events (11).

The Beclin-1 Complex Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting proteins that are part of the Beclin-1 complexes. The kit includes enough antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: A number of studies have identified distinct complexes involving Beclin-1 and PI3K Kinase Class III with specific roles in autophagy and vesicle trafficking (1,2). These complexes commonly contain Beclin-1, PI3KC3/VSP34, and PIK3R4/VPS15 and function to catalyze the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol at the D3 position, producing phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate. Specificity of PI3KC3 activity is regulated by additional binding partners. Complex 1 contains Atg14 which is required for early stages of autophagosome nucleation (3,4). Complex 2 lacks Atg14, but instead contains UVRAG, and is important for autophagosome maturation and endocytic trafficking (4-6). A third complex, containing both UVRAG and Rubicon, negatively regulates canonical autophagy (7,8). Importantly, this complex containing Rubicon is critical for a related process of LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP) in which extracellular pathogens binding to cell surface receptors are engulfed by a single membrane phagosome and degraded by the lysosome (9,10).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in mouse cells and tissue. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated CD45 (D3F8Q) Rabbit mAb #70257.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The protein phosphatase (PTP) receptor CD45 is a type I transmembrane protein comprised of a pair of intracellular tyrosine phosphatase domains and a variable extracellular domain generated by alternative splicing (1). The catalytic activity of CD45 is a function of the first phosphatase domain (D1) while the second phosphatase domain (D2) may interact with and stabilize the first domain, or recruit/bind substrates (2,3). CD45 interacts directly with antigen receptor complex proteins or activates Src family kinases involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell antigen receptor signaling (1). Specifically, CD45 dephosphorylates Src-family kinases Lck and Fyn at their conserved negative regulatory carboxy-terminal tyrosine residues and upregulates kinase activity. Conversely, studies indicate that CD45 can also inhibit Lck and Fyn by dephosphorylating their positive regulatory autophosphorylation site. CD45 appears to be both a positive and a negative regulator that conducts signals depending on specific stimuli and cell type (1). Human leukocytes including lymphocytes, eosinophils, monocytes, basophils, and neutrophils express CD45, while erythrocytes and platelets are negative for CD45 expression (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MTAP is an enzyme that is essential for the salvage pathway for both adenine and methionine synthesis. MTAP catalyzes the cleavage of 5’-methylthioadenosine into adenine and 5-methylthio-D-ribose-1-phosphate. Adenine is then used to generate AMP whereas 5-methylthio-D-ribose-1-phosphate is converted into methionine (1,2). MTAP is expressed in all normal cells and tissues, although frequently lost in different human tumors including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors, non-small cell lung carcinoma and breast carcinoma. MTAP is usually codeleted with p16 (cdkN2a/ARF) (3-5). MTAP overexpression in breast cancer cells inhibits their ability to form colonies in soft agar, thereby implicating its function as a tumor suppressor (6).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Acetyl-Histone H2B (Lys5) (D5H1S) XP® Rabbit mAb #12799.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). The p300/CBP histone acetyltransferases acetylate multiple lysine residues in the amino terminal tail of histone H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20) at gene promoters during transcriptional activation (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the access of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites that facilitate recruitment of many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins that contain a bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Histone H2B is mono-ubiquitinated at Lys120 during transcriptional activation by the RAD6 E2 protein in conjunction with the BRE1A/BRE1B E3 ligase (also known as RNF20/RNF40) (7). Mono-ubiquitinated histone H2B Lys120 is associated with the transcribed region of active genes and stimulates transcriptional elongation by facilitating FACT-dependent chromatin remodeling (7-9). In addition, it is essential for subsequent methylation of histone H3 Lys4 and Lys79, two additional histone modifications that regulate transcriptional initiation and elongation (10). In response to metabolic stress, AMPK is recruited to responsive genes and phosphorylates histone H2B at Lys36, both at promoters and in transcribed regions of genes, and may regulate transcriptional elongation (11). In response to multiple apoptotic stimuli, histone H2B is phosphorylated at Ser14 by the Mst1 kinase (12). Upon induction of apoptosis, Mst1 is cleaved and activated by caspase-3, leading to global phosphorylation of histone H2B during chromatin condensation. Interestingly, histone H2B is rapidly phosphorylated at irradiation-induced DNA damage foci in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (13). In this case, phosphorylation at Ser14 is rapid, depends on prior phosphorylation of H2AX Ser139, and occurs in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that Ser14 phosphorylation may have distinct roles in DNA-damage repair and apoptosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TRPV4 is a member of the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) family of ion channels, and functions as a Ca2+-permeant non-selective cation channel. TRPV4 channels are expressed in many cell types, with particular abundance in sensory and spinal neurons (1). TRPV4 channels play a role in maintaining cellular homeostasis, by facilitating transmembrane Ca2+ transport in response to various stimuli, including thermal stress, fatty acid metabolites, and hypotonicity (2). Mutations in the TRPV4 gene have consequently been attributed to a variety of pathological conditions. For example, constitutively active TRPV4 mutants can lead to excess Ca2+ influx, resulting in toxicity and degeneration of peripheral nerves (3). TRPV4-dependent Ca2+ influx was also shown to mediate strain-induced and TGFβ1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), suggesting a mechanistic role for TRPV4-mediated Ca2+ transport in fibrosis and oncogenesis (4). Consistent with this, studies in capillary endothelial cells showed that mechanical strain-induced Ca2+ influx through TRPV4 promote focal adhesion and stress fiber remodeling, mediated specifically through integrins, PI3K, and downstream kinases including Rho and ROCK (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Paxillin is a multidomain protein that localizes primarily to focal adhesion sites in the extracellular matrix (1). Paxillin is one of the key components of integrin signaling, and tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin is required for integrin-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization (2). Paxillin is phosphorylated by another focal adhesion component, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), at Tyr118 (3,4). Phospho-Paxillin (Tyr118) may provide a docking site for recruitment of other signaling molecules to focal adhesions. It has been shown that the SH2 domain of Crk binds to the phosphorylated Tyr118 of paxillin (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MMP-13 (collagenase 3) belongs to the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) superfamily of enzymes that targets many extracellular proteins, including other proteases, growth factors, cell surface receptors, and adhesion molecules (1, 2). MMP-13 is a member of a subgroup of collagenases (including MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-18) that play an even more important function targeting fibrillar collagen. MMP-13 is synthesized as a latent proenzyme, and proteolytic removal of the inhibitory propeptide domain is required for enzyme activation. MMP-13 protein levels are regulated at the transcriptional level, via specific transcription factors and via promoter DNA methylation (3, 4). MMP-13 preferentially cleaves Type II collagen, and research studies have shown that aberrant upregulation of MMP-13 activity can lead to cartilage loss and osteoarthritis (5, 6). In addition, MMP-13 has been shown to promote cancer development, in part through enhancing tumor angiogenesis and metastases (7-9), suggesting that collagenase activity may serve as a useful marker of tumor progression (10).

The Pathological Hallmarks of Alzheimer's Disease Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting the activation of Tau and APP family members using phospho-specific, and control antibodies for both proteins. The kit includes enough antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Tau is a heterogeneous microtubule-associated protein that promotes and stabilizes microtubule assembly, especially in axons. Six isoforms with different amino-terminal inserts and different numbers of tandem repeats near the carboxy terminus have been identified, and tau is hyperphosphorylated at approximately 25 sites by ERK, GSK-3, and CDK5 (1,2). Phosphorylation decreases the ability of tau to bind to microtubules. Neurofibrillary tangles are a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; these tangles are bundles of paired helical filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. In particular, phosphorylation at Ser396 by GSK-3 or CDK5 destabilizes microtubules. Furthermore, research studies have shown that inclusions of tau are found in a number of other neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as tauopathies (1,3). The cerebrospinal fluid concentration of tau phosphorylated at Thr181 has been proposed to be a biomarker for the study of neurodegenerative disorders (4).Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (4). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (4). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (4). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (5-8). Aβ-43 has been suggested as a biomarker in early onset of Alzheimer's disease, where patients have lower levels of Aβ-43 in cerebrospinal fluid (8-10). Several studies have shown that Aβ toxicity of Aβ-43 is as high as Aβ-42 or Aβ-40 in different models of Alzheimer's disease, including mouse models and human disease (10).

PTMScan® Technology employs a proprietary methodology from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) for peptide enrichment by immunoprecipitation using a specific bead-conjugated antibody in conjunction with liquid chromatography (LC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for quantitative profiling of post-translational modification (PTM) sites in cellular proteins. These include phosphorylation (PhosphoScan®), ubiquitination (UbiScan®), acetylation (AcetylScan®), and methylation (MethylScan®), among others. PTMScan® Technology enables researchers to isolate, identify, and quantitate large numbers of post-translationally modified cellular peptides with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, providing a global overview of PTMs in cell and tissue samples without preconceived biases about where these modified sites occur (1). For more information on PTMScan® Proteomics Services, please visit www.cellsignal.com/services/index.html
The Microglia Cross Module Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting proteins identified as markers of microglial activity corresponding to proliferation, neurodegeneration, interferon and LPS-relation by western blot and/or immunofluorescence.

Background: Distinct microglial activation states have been identified using RNA-seq data from a vast array of neurological disease and aging models. These activation states have been categorized into modules corresponding to proliferation, neurodegeneration, interferon-relation, LPS-relation, and many others (1). Previous work identifying markers of specific brain cell types using RNA-seq has shown HS1 and ASC/TMS1 to be useful and specific tools to study microglia (2). HS1 is a protein kinase substrate that is expressed only in tissues and cells of hematopoietic origin (3) and ASC/TMS1 has been found to be a critical component of inflammatory signaling where it associates with and activates caspase-1 in response to pro-inflammatory signals (4).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated DAP12 (D7G1X) Rabbit mAb #12492.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNAX-activating protein 12 (DAP12, TYROBP) is a signaling adaptor for several pathogen receptors expressed by cells of the innate immune system (1). The DAP12 protein structure consists of a short extracellular domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) (2). DAP12 protein is expressed by hematopoietic cells, including NK cells, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, mast cells, basophils, eosinophils, neutrophils, and some γδ T cells and NKT cells (1). DAP12 exists as a homodimer that associates with a variety of receptors involved in pathogen detection, including the KIR family of NK cell receptors (2,3). Ligand binding by DAP12-associated receptors results in phosphorylation of tyrosine residues within the DAP12 ITAM by Src family kinases and leads to activation of Syk or Zap-70 and downstream signaling responses (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tryptase is the most abundant neutral serine protease expressed in the secretory granules of all human mast cells (1). Tryptase is secreted upon the coupled activation-degranulation response of mast cells in peripheral tissues to physical factors such as trauma, toxins, venoms, endogenous mediators, and immune mechanisms (IgE-dependent and IgE-independent) (2). Tryptase has distinct enzymatic functions that depend on the monomeric or homotetrameric state of this protein, the pH of the environment, and the presence or absence of heparin (3-5). Tryptase has the ability to cleave extracellular substrates such as vasoactive intestinal peptide (6), calcitonin gene-related peptide (7), fibronectin (8), fibrinogen (3), and kininogens (9). Tryptase is also a potent growth factor for epithelial cells, airway smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts (10-13).

PTMScan® Technology employs a proprietary methodology from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) for peptide enrichment by immunoprecipitation using a specific bead-conjugated antibody in conjunction with liquid chromatography (LC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for quantitative profiling of post-translational modification (PTM) sites in cellular proteins. These include phosphorylation (PhosphoScan®), ubiquitination (UbiScan®), acetylation (AcetylScan®), and methylation (MethylScan®), among others. PTMScan® Technology enables researchers to isolate, identify, and quantitate large numbers of post-translationally modified cellular peptides with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, providing a global overview of PTMs in cell and tissue samples without preconceived biases about where these modified sites occur (1). For more information on PTMScan® Proteomics Services, please visit www.cellsignal.com/services/index.html
The Microglia Neurodegeneration Module Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting proteins identified as markers of microglial activity during neurodegeneration by western blot and/or immunofluorescence.

Background: Distinct microglial activation states have been identified using RNA-seq data from a vast array of neurological disease and aging models. These activation states have been categorized into modules corresponding to proliferation, neurodegeneration, interferon-relation, LPS-relation, and many others (1). Previous work identifying markers of specific brain cell types using RNA-seq has shown HS1 and ASC/TMS1 to be useful and specific tools to study microglia (2). HS1 is a protein kinase substrate that is expressed only in tissues and cells of hematopoietic origin (3) and ASC/TMS1 has been found to be a critical component of inflammatory signaling where it associates with and activates caspase-1 in response to pro-inflammatory signals (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphorylated CTD Interacting Factor 1 (PCIF1), also known as CAPAM, is a WW domain-containing protein that was initially discovered to interact with phosphorylated RNA Polymerase II, where it inhibits CTD phosphatase activity of SCP1 to negatively affect gene expression (1,2). CAPAM/PCIF1 has shown to be the methyltransferase responsible for methylating the adenosine at the second position of mRNAs, promoting their translation (3,4).

The Tyro/Axl/Mer Activation Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting the activation of TAM family members using phospho-specific and control antibodies. The kit includes enough antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: Axl, Mer and Tyro3 are three members of the TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase that share a common NCAM (neural adhesion molecule)-related extracellular domain and a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. These receptors bind common homologous vitamin K dependent protein GAS6 and protein S to activate downstream signaling pathways (1). TAM family receptors are involved in the development of immune, nervous, vascular and reproductive systems, autoimmune disease, cancer drug resistance and tumor immunity response (2-5). Axl (Tyr698), Axl (Tyr702), Mer Tyr(749) and Tyro3 (Tyr681) are conserved autophosphorylation sites located in the activation loop of the respective tyrosine kinase domains. Phosphorylation at these sites is required for full kinase activation of each of the corresponding receptors (6,7).

The Mouse Reactive Inflammasome Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting multiple inflammasome components. The kit includes enough antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: The innate immune system works as the first line of defense in protection from pathogenic microbes and host-derived signals of cellular distress. One way in which these “danger” signals trigger inflammation is through activation of inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that assemble in the cytosol after exposure to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and result in the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent cleavage of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 (Reviewed in 1-6). Inflammasome complexes typically consist of a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor (PRR; a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat [NLR] or AIM2-like receptor [ALR] family member), an adaptor protein (ASC/TMS1), and pro-caspase-1. A number of distinct inflammasome complexes have been identified, each with a unique PRR and activation triggers. The best characterized is the NLRP3 complex, which contains NLRP3, ASC/TMS1, and pro-caspase-1. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in a two-step process. First, NF-κB signaling is induced through PAMP- or DAMP-mediated activation of TLR4 or TNFR, resulting in increased expression of NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and pro-IL-18 (priming step, signal 1). Next, indirect activation of NLRP3 occurs by a multitude of signals (whole pathogens, PAMPs/DAMPs, potassium efflux, lysosomal-damaging environmental factors [uric acid, silica, alum] and endogenous factors [amyloid-β, cholesterol crystals], and mitochondrial damage), leading to complex assembly and activation of caspase-1 (signal 2). The complex inflammasome structure is built via domain interactions among the protein components. Other inflammasomes are activated by more direct means: double-stranded DNA activates the AIM2 complex, anthrax toxin activates NLRP1, and bacterial flagellin activates NLRC4. Activated caspase-1 induces secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and -18, but also regulates metabolic enzyme expression, phagosome maturation, vasodilation, and pyroptosis, an inflammatory programmed cell death. Inflammasome signaling contributes to the onset of a number of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and autoimmune disorders.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The solute carrier 6 gene (SLC6), also known as the neurotransmitter–sodium-symporter family or Na+/Cl- -dependent transporter, encodes for proteins that regulate neurotransmitter (NTT) transport, including monoamine transmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrin (SERT), GABA transmitters (GAT1, GAT2, GAT3, and BGT1), and glycine transmitters (GLYT1 and GLYT2) (1). These proteins express ubiquitously in the brain and regulate the release and uptake of neurotransmitters in terminal clefts, in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells (2-4). Dysregulation of NTT-transporters is associated with neurological disease like epilepsy, schizophrenia, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and addictions to cocaine and methamphetamines (1). Inhibitors of NTT-transporters are widely used as drugs to treat disorders like depression (tricyclic antidepressants), and antiepileptic tiagabine (5). GAT1 is the only GABA transporter genetically studied in GAT1-KO mouse models where an accumulation of extracellular GABA, leading to a decrease in anxiety and depression-like behaviors (6-8). The lack or reduction of GAT1 diminished aggression in mice, and a condition known as hypoaglesia, where there is a decreased sensitivity to painful stimuli (8,9). GAT1 post-translational modifications include phosphorylation at Tyr107 (IL1), and Tyr317 (IL3), and these mutations identify as the phospho-acceptor-sites, therefore regulating GAT1 (10,11). GABA trafficking is regulated by Tyr phosphorylation, and it has been shown that activation of adenosine A2A receptors in the hippocampus synaptosomes enhanced BAGA uptake by opposing a constitutive PKC-mediated down-regulation of GAT1 (11-13).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in mouse tissue. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated β-Amyloid (1-43 Preferred) (E8C2D) Rabbit mAb #32098.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SLAMF6 (CD352/NTB-A) is a type-I transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of immunomodulatory receptors. Like other members of the SLAM receptor family, SLAMF6 contains Ig-like domains within its extracellular region and conserved tyrosine-based signaling motifs within its intracellular domain that, when phosphorylated, bind to the SAP and EAT-2 signaling adaptors (1). SLAMF6 is expressed on the surface of multiple types of immune cells, such as those of the B, T, and NK lineages. Its activation is triggered by homotypic interactions involving its extracellular domain (1-3). Indeed, research studies have shown that in T-cells, SLAMF6 engagement facilitates activation and cytokine production (4). Similarly, homotypic ligand-mediated engagement of SLAMF6 on NK cells activates signaling cascades that drive proliferation, cytotoxicity, and cytokine production (1,5-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

The Toll-like Receptor Antibody Sampler Kit II provides an economical means of detecting expression of various Toll-like receptors (TLRs). The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR6, and TLR11 are localized to the plasma membrane, while TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 are localized to intracellular membranes including endosomal membranes. Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm. TLR1 and TLR6 associate with TLR2 to cooperatively mediate response to bacterial lipoproteins and fungal zymosan (6,15). TLR3 is an endosomal TLR that recognizes double-stranded RNA derived from viruses (7). TLR7 and TLR8 recognize single-stranded viral RNA and are also activated by synthetic imidazoquinoline compounds including R-848 (16,17). TLR9 recognizes unmethylated CpG motifs present on bacterial DNA (18).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Glucocorticoid Receptor (D6H2L) XP® Rabbit mAb #12041.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$260
100 µl
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The T-box family of transcription factors is named for their shared homology with the DNA binding domain of the mouse brachyury (T) gene product. Members of this family bind DNA and are capable of transcriptional activation. They also have evolutionarily conserved expression patterns and roles in embryonic development, primarily mesoderm development (1). EOMES, or Tbr2 (T-box brain 2), is a master regulator of mesoderm formation that is also essential for trophoblast formation, gastrulation, neurogenesis and the differentiation of certain T cell subsets. Embryos from EOMES knock-out mice die soon after implantation due to their inability to develop a trophoblast (2,3). Conditional neural knock out mice show defects in development of a specific population of neural progenators known as Intermediate Progenator Cells (IPCs) that give rise only to neurons (4,5). These cells are formed from the radial glia in the ventricular and sub-ventricular zones of the cortex. Expression of EOMES increases as cells develop from radial glia to IPCs and then decreases as IPCs progress to neurons. Recent evidence suggests that EOMES and IPCs may also play a role neurogenesis in the adult hippocampal SGZ (5). EOMES is also a key transcription factor for memory T cells and for full effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells (6). Expression of EOMES is induced in CD8+ T cells following viral infection and bacterial infection where sufficient IL-12 has been produced to elicit acute host cell response (7).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated TXNIP (D5F3E) Rabbit mAb #14715.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ubiquitously expressed thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) binds and inhibits thioredoxin to regulate cellular redox state (1-3). Research studies demonstrate that hyperglycemia induces TXNIP expression and increases cellular oxidative stress (1). In addition, these studies show that TXNIP reduces glucose uptake directly by binding the glucose transporter Glut1 to stimulate receptor internalization or indirectly by reducing Glut1 mRNA levels (3). Additional studies indicate that TXNIP plays a role in the regulation of insulin mRNA transcription (4). Microarray analyses indicate that TXNIP acts downstream of PPARγ and is a putative tumor suppressor that may control thyroid cancer cell progression (5). In addition, the TXNIP protein may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and some disorders related to ER-stress (6).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The T-box family of transcription factors is named for their shared homology with the DNA binding domain of the mouse brachyury (T) gene product. Members of this family bind DNA and are capable of transcriptional activation. They also have evolutionarily conserved expression patterns and roles in embryonic development, primarily mesoderm development (1). EOMES, or Tbr2 (T-box brain 2), is a master regulator of mesoderm formation that is also essential for trophoblast formation, gastrulation, neurogenesis and the differentiation of certain T cell subsets. Embryos from EOMES knock-out mice die soon after implantation due to their inability to develop a trophoblast (2,3). Conditional neural knock out mice show defects in development of a specific population of neural progenators known as Intermediate Progenator Cells (IPCs) that give rise only to neurons (4,5). These cells are formed from the radial glia in the ventricular and sub-ventricular zones of the cortex. Expression of EOMES increases as cells develop from radial glia to IPCs and then decreases as IPCs progress to neurons. Recent evidence suggests that EOMES and IPCs may also play a role neurogenesis in the adult hippocampal SGZ (5). EOMES is also a key transcription factor for memory T cells and for full effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells (6). Expression of EOMES is induced in CD8+ T cells following viral infection and bacterial infection where sufficient IL-12 has been produced to elicit acute host cell response (7).