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Product listing: Phospho-LRP6 (Ser1490) Antibody, UniProt ID O75581 #2568 to PSD95 Antibody, UniProt ID P78352 #2507

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: LRP5 and LRP6 are single-pass transmembrane proteins belonging to the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein family. Unlike other members of the LDLR family, LRP5 and LRP6 have four EGF and three LDLR repeats in the extracellular domain, and proline-rich motifs in the cytoplasmic domain (1). They function as co-receptors for Wnt and are required for the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway (2,3). LRP5 and LRP6 are highly homologous and have redundant roles during development (4,5). The activity of LRP5 and LRP6 can be inhibited by the binding of some members of the Dickkopf (DKK) family of proteins (6,7). Upon stimulation with Wnt, LRP6 is phosphorylated at multiple sites including Thr1479, Ser1490, and Thr1493 by kinases such as GSK-3 and CK1 (8-10). Phosphorylated LRP6 recruits axin to the membrane and presumably activates β-catenin signaling (8-10).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Although originally identified based on their roles in calcium and bone homeostasis, the vitamin D3 receptor (VDR/NR1I1) and its ligand 1-α, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1α, 25(OH)2D3] are now recognized to exert biological effects in almost every tissue of the human body. Targets for vitamin D signaling include the central nervous system, skin, immune system, endocrine glands, kidney, and colon. At the cellular level, vitamin D signaling affects proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of both normal and transformed cells. Within the steroid receptor gene family, VDR belongs to the NR1I subfamily that also includes NR1I2/PXR and NR1I3/CAR. The human VDR gene is composed of 11 exons that encode six domains (A-F) of the full length VDR protein, which includes an N-terminal dual zinc finger DNA binding domain, a C-terminal ligand-binding activity domain, and an extensive unstructured region that links the two functional domains together (1). Upon 1α, 25(OH)2D3 binding to the hormone ligand-binding domain, VDR is stabilized by the phosphorylation of Ser51 in the DNA-binding domain by PKC (2), and Ser208 in the hinge region by casein kinase II (3). VDR associates with the retinoic acid receptor (RXR) through dimerization domains. The 1α, 25(OH)2D3-VDR-RXR complex binds to the vitamin D response elements (VDREs) in the promoters of target genes through the DNA-binding domain. Ligand-induced conformation changes in VDR results in the dissociation of the co-repressor, silencing-mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT), and allows interaction of the VDR activation function (AF2) transactivation domain with transcriptional coactivators (1).Studies have shown that variable VDR expression is associated with different forms or stages of cancer and likely results from tissue-type variation in 1α, 25(OH)2D3 signaling. In the case of colon cancer, research indicates that VDR expression is relatively higher in hyperplastic colon polyps and during early tumorigenesis but diminishes in later stage, poorly differentiated tumors. Multiple studies suggest that 1α, 25(OH)2D3 may be an attractive target for development as a therapeutic anticancer agent (4,5) .

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Btk/Tec family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases. Like other Btk family members, it contains a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and Src homology SH3 and SH2 domains. Btk plays an important role in B cell development (1,2). Activation of B cells by various ligands is accompanied by Btk membrane translocation mediated by its PH domain binding to phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (3-5). The membrane-localized Btk is active and associated with transient phosphorylation of two tyrosine residues, Tyr551 and Tyr223. Tyr551 in the activation loop is transphosphorylated by the Src family tyrosine kinases, leading to autophosphorylation at Tyr223 within the SH3 domain, which is necessary for full activation (6,7). The activation of Btk is negatively regulated by PKCβ through phosphorylation of Btk at Ser180, which results in reduced membrane recruitment, transphosphorylation, and subsequent activation (8). The PKC inhibitory signal is likely to be a key determinant of the B cell receptor signaling threshold to maintain optimal Btk activity (8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a widely expressed cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinase involved in integrin-mediated signal transduction. It plays an important role in the control of several biological processes, including cell spreading, migration, and survival (1). Activation of FAK by integrin clustering leads to autophosphorylation at Tyr397, which is a binding site for the Src family kinases PI3K and PLCγ (2-5). Recruitment of Src family kinases results in the phosphorylation of Tyr407, Tyr576, and Tyr577 in the catalytic domain, and Tyr871 and Tyr925 in the carboxy-terminal region of FAK (6,7).

$307
200 µl
$719
600 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: p38 MAP kinase (MAPK), also called RK (1) or CSBP (2), is the mammalian orthologue of the yeast HOG kinase that participates in a signaling cascade controlling cellular responses to cytokines and stress (1-4). Four isoforms of p38 MAPK, p38α, β, γ (also known as Erk6 or SAPK3), and δ (also known as SAPK4) have been identified. Similar to the SAPK/JNK pathway, p38 MAPK is activated by a variety of cellular stresses including osmotic shock, inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV light, and growth factors (1-5). MKK3, MKK6, and SEK activate p38 MAPK by phosphorylation at Thr180 and Tyr182. Activated p38 MAPK has been shown to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAP kinase 2 (3) and to phosphorylate the transcription factors ATF-2 (5), Max (6), and MEF2 (5-8). SB203580 (4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-imidazole) is a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK. This compound inhibits the activation of MAPKAPK-2 by p38 MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (9). SB203580 inhibits p38 MAPK catalytic activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket, but does not inhibit phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by upstream kinases (10).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Necroptosis, a regulated pathway for necrotic cell death, is triggered by a number of inflammatory signals including cytokines in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family, pathogen sensors such as toll-like receptors (TLRs), and ischemic injury (1,2). The process is negatively regulated by caspases and is initiated through a complex containing the RIP1 and RIP3 kinases, typically referred to as the necrosome. Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) is a pseudokinase that was identified as downstream target of RIP3 in the necroptosis pathway (3,4). During necroptosis RIP3 is phosphorylated at Ser227, which recruits MLKL and leads to its phosphorylation at Thr357 and Ser358 (3). Knockdown of MLKL through multiple mechanisms results in inhibition of necroptosis (3-5). While the precise mechanism for MLKL-induced necroptosis is unclear, some studies have shown that necroptosis leads to oligomerization of MLKL and translocation to the plasma membrane, where it effects membrane integrity (6-9).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YAP (Yes-associated protein, YAP65) was identified based on its ability to associate with the SH3 domain of Yes. It also binds to other SH3 domain-containing proteins such as Nck, Crk, Src, and Abl (1). In addition to the SH3 binding motif, YAP contains a PDZ interaction motif, a coiled-coil domain, and WW domains (2-4). While initial studies of YAP all pointed towards a role in anchoring and targeting to specific subcellular compartments, subsequent studies showed that YAP is a transcriptional co-activator by virtue of its WW domain interacting with the PY motif (PPxY) of the transcription factor PEBP2 and other transcription factors (5). In its capacity as a transcriptional co-activator, YAP is now widely recognized as a central mediator of the Hippo Pathway, which plays a fundamental and widely conserved role in regulating tissue growth and organ size. Phosphorylation at multiple sites (e.g., Ser109, Ser127) by LATS kinases promotes YAP translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it is sequestered through association with 14-3-3 proteins (6-8). These LATS-driven phosphorylation events serve to prime YAP for subsequent phosphorylation by CK1δ/ε in an adjacent phosphodegron, triggering proteosomal degradation of YAP (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 are frequently mutated in cases of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and have roles in multiple processes related to DNA damage, repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, ubiquitination, and apoptosis (1-4). BRCA2 has been shown to be required for localization of Rad51 to sites of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, and cells lacking BRCA1 and BRCA2 cannot repair DSBs through the Rad51-dependent process of homologous recombination (HR) (5). Numerous DNA damage-induced phosphorylation sites on BRCA1 have been identified, including Ser988, 1189, 1387, 1423, 1457, 1524, and 1542, and kinases activated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, including Aurora A and CDK2, can also phosphorylate BRCA1 at Ser308 and Ser1497, respectively (6-10). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of BRCA2 at Ser3291 by CDKs has been proposed as a mechanism to switch off HR as cells progress beyond S-phase by blocking the carboxy terminal Rad51 binding site (11).

$142
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Western Blotting

$140
30 immunoprecipitations
1 ml
ChiP-Grade Protein G Agarose Beads are an affinity matrix for the small-scale isolation of immunocomplexes from chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP assays). A truncated form of recombinant Protein G is covalently coupled to agarose beads. Protein G exhibits high affinity for subclasses of IgG from many species (including human, rabbit, mouse, rat and sheep) and can be used for immunoprecipitation assays with these antibodies. The beads are stored in buffer containing BSA (500 µg/ml) and sonicated salmon sperm DNA (200 µg/ml) to block non-specific binding of proteins and DNA during isolation of immunocomplexes. These beads are not compatible with ChIP-seq because the sonicated salmon sperm DNA interferes with downstream sequencing.
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected
$81
10 ml each substrate
20 ml
$363
50 ml each substrate
100 ml
SignalFire™ Plus ECL Reagent from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) is a highly sensitive chemiluminescent substrate capable of detecting low picogram amounts of protein by western blot analysis. SignalFire™ Plus ECL Reagent has an extended duration of signal output lasting several hours following blot exposure, allowing for multiple exposures with either film or a digital imaging system. The strong signal output allows detection of low abundance proteins, conservation of reagents, and short exposure times.SignalFire™ Plus ECL Reagent requires approximately five-fold less Anti-rabbit IgG, HRP-linked Antibody #7074 or Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibody #7076 than traditional ECL reagents. Limiting the amount of HRP exposed to the membrane prevents high background, oversaturation of the target protein signal, or false negative results. Other HRP-conjugated antibodies, including HRP-conjugated primary and anti-biotin-HRP antibodies, should be diluted similarly. Dilution of secondary antibody from alternative vendors may need to be optimized. Titration of lysate and primary antibody concentration is recommended to achieve optimal signal-to-noise ratio.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Chemiluminescence systems have emerged as the best all-around method for western blot detection. They eliminate the hazards associated with radioactive materials and toxic chromogenic substrates. The speed and sensitivity of these methods are unequalled by traditional alternatives, and because results are generated on film, it is possible to record and store data permanently. Blots detected with chemiluminescent methods are easily stripped for subsequent reprobing with additional antibodies. HRP-conjugated secondary antibodies are utilized in conjunction with specific chemiluminescent substrates to generate the light signal. HRP conjugates have a very high turnover rate, yielding good sensitivity with short reaction times.

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated antibody β-Actin (D6A8) Rabbit mAb #8457.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and referred to as autophagy-related (Atg) genes. Formation of the autophagosome involves a ubiquitin-like conjugation system in which Atg12 is covalently bound to Atg5 and targeted to autophagosome vesicles (4-6). This conjugation reaction is mediated by the ubiquitin E1-like enzyme Atg7 and the E2-like enzyme Atg10 (7,8).

$40
30 ml
PathScan® Sandwich ELISA Lysis buffer is used to create cell extract for ELISA applications.
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Necroptosis, a regulated pathway for necrotic cell death, is triggered by a number of inflammatory signals including cytokines in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family, pathogen sensors such as toll-like receptors (TLRs), and ischemic injury (1,2). The process is negatively regulated by caspases and is initiated through a complex containing the RIP1 and RIP3 kinases, typically referred to as the necrosome. Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) is a pseudokinase that was identified as downstream target of RIP3 in the necroptosis pathway (3,4). During necroptosis RIP3 is phosphorylated at Ser227, which recruits MLKL and leads to its phosphorylation at Thr357 and Ser358 (3). Knockdown of MLKL through multiple mechanisms results in inhibition of necroptosis (3-5). While the precise mechanism for MLKL-induced necroptosis is unclear, some studies have shown that necroptosis leads to oligomerization of MLKL and translocation to the plasma membrane, where it effects membrane integrity (6-9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected, Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of lysine, like phosphorylation of serine, threonine or tyrosine, is an important reversible modification controlling protein activity. The conserved amino-terminal domains of the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4) contain lysines that are acetylated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) (1). Signaling resulting in acetylation/deacetylation of histones, transcription factors, and other proteins affects a diverse array of cellular processes including chromatin structure and gene activity, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (2-6). Recent proteomic surveys suggest that acetylation of lysine residues may be a widespread and important form of posttranslational protein modification that affects thousands of proteins involved in control of cell cycle and metabolism, longevity, actin polymerization, and nuclear transport (7,8). The regulation of protein acetylation status is impaired in cancer and polyglutamine diseases (9), and HDACs have become promising targets for anti-cancer drugs currently in development (10).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair (1). Activation of ATM by autophosphorylation on Ser1981 occurs in response to exposed DNA double stranded breaks. ATM kinase regulates a number of proteins involved in cell cycle checkpoint control, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Known substrates include p53, Chk2, Chk1, CtIP, 4E-BP1, BRCA1, RPA3, H2A.X, SMC1, FANCD2, Rad17, Artemis, Nbs1, and the I-2 regulatory subunit of PP1 (1,2). Mutations in the corresponding ATM gene result in ataxia telangiectasia (AT), an autosomal recessive disease characterized by uncoordinated muscle movement and neurodegeneration. Cells from AT patients display defective DNA damage-induced checkpoint activation, sensitivity to radiation, and a higher frequency of chromosome breakage (3,4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) protein is an innate immune receptor that is expressed on the cell surface of microglia, macrophages, osteoclasts, and immature dendritic cells (1). The TREM2 receptor is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein that consists of an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. TREM2 interacts with the tyrosine kinase-binding protein DAP12 to form a receptor-signaling complex (2). The TREM2 protein plays a role in innate immunity and a rare functional variant (R47H) of TREM2 is associated with the late-onset risk of Alzheimer’s disease (1,3). Research studies using mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease indicate that deficiency and haploinsufficiency of TREM2 can lead to increased β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation as a result of dysfunctional microglia response (4). These results agree with the distribution of TREM2 in human brain regions (e.g., white matter, the hippocampus, and neocortex) that are involved in Alzheimer's disease pathology (2). In addition, amyloid plaque formation induces expression of TREM2 and amyloid phagocytosis (5). Loss-of-function mutations in the corresponding TREM2 or DAP12 genes can result in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare form of progressive presenile dementia that results from polycystic osseous lesions (6). TREM2 membrane shedding occurs by cleavage at the extracellular site between H157/S158 generating an N-terminal shedded fragment and a membrane bound C-terminal fragment (7, 8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: EGR family members are transcriptional factors that contain three repetitive zinc finger DNA binding domains which bind to EGR response elements (ER) to regulate target gene expression (1). The expression of EGR family members is induced by growth factors, with EGR1 expression being induced by NGF (1,2). Increased EGR1 expression activates transcription of other signaling molecules, including CDK5 and tyrosine hydroxylase, and exerts long term effects on neural cell growth and differentiation (2,3).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
CST's PathScan® Phospho-Insulin Receptor β (Tyr1150/1151) Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects transfected phospho-insulin receptor (Tyr1150/1151) protein. An Insulin Receptor β Mouse mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, both phospho- and nonphospho-insulin receptor proteins are captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, Phospho-IGF-I Receptor β (Tyr1135/1136)/Insulin Receptor β (Tyr1150/1151) Rabbit mAb is added to detect the captured phospho-insulin receptor (Tyr1150/1151) protein. Anti-rabbit IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of optical density for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of phospho-insulin receptor β (Tyr1150/1151) protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Background: Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that is widely expressed in many cell lines and cell types within fetal and postnatal tissues (1-3). Receptor autophosphorylation follows binding of the IGF-I and IGF-II ligands. Three tyrosine residues within the kinase domain (Tyr1131, Tyr1135, and Tyr1136) are the earliest major autophosphorylation sites (4). Phosphorylation of these three tyrosine residues is necessary for kinase activation (5,6). Insulin receptors (IRs) share significant structural and functional similarity with IGF-I receptors, including the presence of an equivalent tyrosine cluster (Tyr1146/1150/1151) within the kinase domain activation loop. Tyrosine autophosphorylation of IRs is one of the earliest cellular responses to insulin stimulation (7). Autophosphorylation begins with phosphorylation at Tyr1146 and either Tyr1150 or Tyr1151, while full kinase activation requires triple tyrosine phosphorylation (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ, and PLCε. Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulate the activity of PLC. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (2). PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783, and 1248 (3). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (4). PLCγ2 is engaged in antigen-dependent signaling in B cells and collagen-dependent signaling in platelets. Phosphorylation by Btk or Lck at Tyr753, 759, 1197, and 1217 is correlated with PLCγ2 activity (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Following protein synthesis, secretory, intra-organellar, and transmembrane proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. The accumulation of unfolded proteins within the ER triggers an adaptive mechanism known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) that counteracts compromised protein folding (1). The transmembrane serine/threonine kinase IRE1, originally identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a proximal sensor for the UPR that transmits the unfolded protein signal across the ER membrane (2-4). The human homolog IRE1α was later identified and is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues (5). Upon activation of the unfolded protein response, IRE1α splices X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) mRNA through an unconventional mechanism using its endoribonuclease activity (6). This reaction converts XBP-1 from an unspliced XBP-1u isoform to the spliced XBP-1s isoform, which is a potent transcriptional activator that induces expression of many UPR responsive genes (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Puma (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a "BH3-only" Bcl-2 family member originally identified in differential gene expression studies as a p53-inducible gene (1,2). The "BH3-only" family members include Bad, Bid, Bik, Hrk, Bim, and Noxa, all of which contain a BH3 domain but lack other conserved domains, BH1 and BH2, and generally promote apoptosis by binding to and antagonizing anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members through BH3 domain interactions (3). Two BH3-containing proteins are produced from the puma gene, Puma-α and Puma-β, both of which are induced by p53, bind Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, localize to the mitochondria, and promote cytochrome c release and apoptosis (1,2). Puma plays a critical role in the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. Targeted disruption of the puma gene impairs p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression (4-7). Puma knockout mice show defects from multiple apoptotic stimuli, including ionizing irradiation, deregulated c-Myc expression, and cytokine withdrawal (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) binds to the mRNA cap structure to mediate the initiation of translation (1,2). eIF4E interacts with eIF4G, a scaffold protein that promotes assembly of eIF4E and eIF4A into the eIF4F complex (2). eIF4B is thought to assist the eIF4F complex in translation initiation. Upon activation by mitogenic and/or stress stimuli mediated by Erk and p38 MAPK, Mnk1 phosphorylates eIF4E at Ser209 in vivo (3,4). Two Erk and p38 MAPK phosphorylation sites in mouse Mnk1 (Thr197 and Thr202) are essential for Mnk1 kinase activity (3). The carboxy-terminal region of eIF4G also contains serum-stimulated phosphorylation sites, including Ser1108, Ser1148, and Ser1192 (5). Phosphorylation at these sites is blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 and by the FRAP/mTOR inhibitor rapamycin.

$118
10 western blots
100 µl
LC3 Control Cell Extracts (HeLa Untreated): Total cell extracts from HeLa cells serve as a negative control. Supplied in SDS sample buffer.LC3 Control Cell Extracts (HeLa +Chloroquine): Total cell extracts from HeLa cells treated with 50 μM chloroquine overnight serve as a positive control.This lysate pair is produced as a control for western blotting of LC3A and LC3B. LC3C cannot be detected in these lysates.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation, but it has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegenerative diseases, infection, and cancer (3). Autophagy marker Light Chain 3 (LC3) was originally identified as a subunit of microtubule-associated proteins 1A and 1B (termed MAP1LC3) (4) and subsequently found to contain similarity to the yeast protein Apg8/Aut7/Cvt5 critical for autophagy (5). Three human LC3 isoforms (LC3A, LC3B, and LC3C) undergo post-translational modifications during autophagy (6-9). Cleavage of LC3 at the carboxy terminus immediately following synthesis yields the cytosolic LC3-I form. During autophagy, LC3-I is converted to LC3-II through lipidation by a ubiquitin-like system involving Atg7 and Atg3 that allows for LC3 to become associated with autophagic vesicles (6-10). The presence of LC3 in autophagosomes and the conversion of LC3 to the lower migrating form, LC3-II, have been used as indicators of autophagy (11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Chicken, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) catalyzes the translocation of peptidyl-tRNA from the A site to the P site on the ribosome. It has been shown that phosphorylation of eEF2 at threonine 56 by eEF2 kinase inhibits its activity (1-4). eEF2 kinase is normally dependent on Ca2+ ions and calmodulin (5,6). eEF2 kinase can also be activated by PKA in response to elevated cAMP levels (7-9), which are generally increased in stress- or starvation-related conditions. A variety of treatments known to raise intracellular Ca2+ or cAMP levels have been shown to result in increased phosphorylation of eEF2, and thus to inhibit peptide-chain elongation. The inactive phosphorylated eEF2 can be converted to its active nonphosphorylated form by a protein phosphatase, most likely a form of protein phosphatase-2A (PP-2A). Insulin, which activates protein synthesis in a wide range of cell types, induces rapid dephosphorylation of eEF2 through mTOR signaling and may involve modulation of the activity of the PP-2A or the eEF2 kinase or both (10).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Postsynaptic Density protein 95 (PSD95) is a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins. These family members consist of an amino-terminal variable segment followed by three PDZ domains, a SH3 domain, and an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain. PSD95 is a scaffolding protein involved in the assembly and function of the postsynaptic density complex (1-2). PSD95 participates in synaptic targeting of AMPA receptors through an indirect manner involving Stargazin and related transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) (3). It is implicated in experience-dependent plasticity and plays an indispensable role in learning (4). Mutations in PSD95 are associated with autism (5).