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Product listing: PPARγ (D69) Antibody, UniProt ID P37231 #2430 to Id2 (D39E8) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q02363 #3431

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a member of the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a transcriptional activator (1). PPARγ is preferentially expressed in adipocytes as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophage (2). Besides its role in mediating adipogenesis and lipid metabolism (2), PPARγ also modulates insulin sensitivity, cell proliferation and inflammation (3). PPARγ transcriptional activity is inhibited by MAP kinase phosphorylation of PPARγ at Ser84 (4,5).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) is a forkhead box family transcription factor that regulates a number of genes throughout the cell cycle to help control DNA replication, mitosis, and cell proliferation. FoxM1 expression increases during G1 and S and reaches maximum levels in G2/M (1-3). Nuclear translocation occurs just before entry into G2/M and is associated with FoxM1 phosphorylation (4). Phosphorylation of FoxM1 by MAPK (Ser331, Ser704), Cyclin/Cdk (Ser4, Ser35, Thr600, Thr611, Thr620, Thr627, Ser638), Plk1 (Ser715, Ser724), and Chk2 (Ser376) stabilizes and activates FoxM1 (4-8). Forkhead box M1 is expressed in all embryonic tissues but is restricted to proliferating tissues in adults (9). Research studies show that FoxM1 expression is negatively regulated by p53 (10,11). Upregulation of FoxM1 is associated with many human cancers, including prostate, breast, lung, ovary, colon, pancreas, stomach, bladder, liver, and kidney, and may be associated with p53 mutations in some tumors (11,12). As a result, FoxM1 inhibitors have become a topic of interest for potential cancer therapy (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Circadian rhythms govern many key physiological processes that fluctuate with a period of approximately 24 hours. These processes include the sleep-wake cycle, glucose, lipid and drug metabolism, heart rate, hormone secretion, renal blood flow, and body temperature, as well as basic cellular processes such as DNA repair and the timing of the cell division cycle (1,2). The mammalian circadian system consists of many individual tissue-specific clocks (peripheral clocks) that are controlled by a master circadian pacemaker residing in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the brain (1,2). The periodic circadian rhythm is prominently manifested by the light-dark cycle, which is sensed by the visual system and processed by the SCN. The SCN processes the light-dark information and synchronizes peripheral clocks through neural and humoral output signals (1,2).The cellular circadian clockwork consists of interwoven positive and negative regulatory loops, or limbs (1,2). The positive limb includes the CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins, two basic helix-loop-helix-PAS containing transcription factors that bind E box enhancer elements and activate transcription of their target genes. CLOCK is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) protein, which acetylates both histone H3 and H4 (3). BMAL1 binds to CLOCK and enhances its HAT activity (3). The CLOCK/BMAL1 dimer exhibits a periodic oscillation in both nuclear/cytoplasmic localization and protein levels, both of which are regulated by phosphorylation (4,5). CLOCK/BMAL1 target genes include the Cry and Per genes, whose proteins form the negative limb of the circadian clockwork system (1,2). CRY and PER proteins (CRY1, CRY2, PER1, PER2 and PER3) form oligomers that also periodically shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. When in the nucleus, CRY/PER proteins inhibit CLOCK/BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation, thus completing the circadian transcriptional loop (1,2). In tissues, roughly six to eight percent of all genes exhibit a circadian expression pattern (1,2). This 24-hour periodicity in gene expression results from coordination of the positive and negative regulatory limbs of the cellular clockwork system, and is fine-tuned by outside signals received from the SCN.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SET domain-containing protein 2 (SETD2 or SET2), also known as lysine N-methyltransferase 3 A (KMT3A), huntingtin yeast partner B (HYBP), and huntingtin-interacting factor (HIF-1), is a ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein methyltransferase that is responsible for the majority of tri-methylation of histone H3 on lysine 36 (H3K36Me3) (1-3). SETD2-mediated H3K36Me3 is critical for proper regulation of transcription elongation, RNA splicing and DNA mismatch repair (1). SETD2 interacts with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) that is hyper-phosphorylated on the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit Rpb1 (2-4). Upon hyper-phosphorylation of the RNAPII CTD during activation of transcriptional elongation, SETD2 is recruited and facilitates tri-methylation of histone H3 lysine 36 in the body of transcriptionally active genes (2-4). H3K36Me3 then acts to recruit the transcription elongation factor FACT, which modulates nucleosome dynamics to facilitate transcription elongation and prevent cryptic transcriptional initiation (5). In addition, H3K36Me3 acts to recruit RNA-splicing proteins and regulate proper splicing of introns concurrent with transcriptional elongation (3, 6-9). In addition to regulating transcription, SETD2-dependent H3K36Me3 regulates DNA mismatch repair by recruiting MutSα (MSH2 and MSH6) to chromatin during G1 and early S phase (10). Loss of SETD2 results in an increase in microsatellite instability and elevated levels of spontaneous mutations (10). SETD2 is often mutated and/or inactivated in multiple types of cancer, including renal cell carcinoma, leukemia, melanoma and liver cancer (11-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The entry of eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by cdc2 kinase activation, a process controlled at several steps including cyclin binding and phosphorylation of cdc2 at Thr161 (1). However, the critical regulatory step in activating cdc2 during progression into mitosis appears to be dephosphorylation of cdc2 at Thr14 and Tyr15 (2). Phosphorylation at Thr14 and Tyr15, resulting in inhibition of cdc2, can be carried out by Wee1 and Myt1 protein kinases (3,4). The cdc25 phosphatase may be responsible for removal of phosphates at Thr14 and Tyr15 and subsequent activation of cdc2 (1,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The Thy1/CD90 cell surface antigen is a GPI-anchored, developmentally regulated protein involved in signaling cascades that mediate neurite outgrowth, T cell activation, tumor suppression, apoptosis, and fibrosis (1). Thy1/CD90 is highly expressed on the surface of adult neurons and is thought to play a role in modulating adhesive and migratory events, such as neurite extension (1,2). Decreased Thy1/CD90 mRNA and protein expression is associated with the development of epithelial ovarian cancer, suggesting a role as a putative tumor suppressor gene of human ovarian cancer (3,4). Research studies indicate that Thy1/CD90 knockout mice have impaired cutaneous immune responses and abnormal retinal development (5,6). Thy1/CD90 is epigenetically regulated or deregulated in some disease states, such as pulmonary fibrosis. The potentially reversible hypermethylation of the Thy1/CD90 promoter offers the possibility of novel therapeutic options in this disease (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 are transmembrane proteins belonging to the presenilin family. Mutation of presenilin genes has been linked to early onset of Alzheimer disease, probably due to presenilin's associated γ-secretase activity for amyloid-β protein processing (1,2). Endogenous presenilin mainly exists in a heterodimeric complex formed from the endoproteolytically processed amino-terminal (34 kDa) and carboxy-terminal (~20, 22, 23 kDa) fragments (CTF) (2,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cullin-4 (CUL4) is a member of the cullin family of related ubiquitin ligases (1). A pair of mammalian CUL4 proteins - CUL4A and CUL4B - has been identified. The carboxy-terminal domain of CUL4 interacts with Rbx1 and E2 enzyme while the amino-terminal CUL4 domain interacts with BPB domain of UV-damaged DNA binding protein DDB1 to form a CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase complex (2). This CUL4-DDB1 complex binds a variety of WD40-containing proteins that help to enhance additional substrate recruitment (2,3). The CUL4 complex has been shown to target substrates involved in DNA repair, cell cycle progression (2), transcription (3), and development (2-6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

Tri-Methyl Histone H3 Antibody Sampler Kit offers an economical means to evaluate the tri-methylation of Histone H3 on multiple residues. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

The Cell Cycle/Checkpoint Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means of evaluating multiple proteins involved in the cell cyle and checkpoint control. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibody to perform four Western blot experiments.

Background: The cell division cycle demands accuracy to avoid the accumulation of genetic damage. This process is controlled by molecular circuits called "checkpoints" that are common to all eukaryotic cells (1). Checkpoints monitor DNA integrity and cell growth prior to replication and division at the G1/S and G2/M transitions, respectively. The cdc2-cyclin B kinase is pivotal in regulating the G2/M transition (2,3). Cdc2 is phosphorylated at Thr14 and Tyr15 during G2-phase by the kinases Wee1 and Myt1, rendering it inactive. The tumor suppressor protein retinoblastoma (Rb) controls progression through the late G1 restriction point (R) and is a major regulator of the G1/S transition (4). During early and mid G1-phase, Rb binds to and represses the transcription factor E2F (5). The phosphorylation of Rb late in G1-phase by CDKs induces Rb to dissociate from E2F, permitting the transcription of S-phase-promoting genes. In vitro, Rb can be phosphorylated at multiple sites by cdc2, cdk2, and cdk4/6 (6-8). DNA damage triggers both the G2/M and the G1/S checkpoints. DNA damage activates the DNA-PK/ATM/ATR kinases, which phosphorylate Chk at Ser345 (9), Chk2 at Thr68 (10) and p53 (11). The Chk kinases inactivate cdc25 via phosphorylation at Ser216, blocking the activation of cdc2.

The Pro-Survival Bcl-2 Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine several members of the Bcl-2 family. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments.

Background: The Bcl-2 family consists of a number of evolutionarily conserved proteins containing Bcl-2 homology domains (BH) that regulate apoptosis through control of mitochondrial membrane permeability and release of cytochrome c (1-3). Four BH domains have been identified (BH1-4) that mediate protein interactions. The family can be separated into three groups based upon function and sequence homology: pro-survival members include Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, A1 and Bcl-w; pro-apoptotic proteins include Bax, Bak and Bok; and "BH3 only" proteins Bad, Bik, Bid, Puma, Bim, Bmf, Noxa and Hrk. Interactions between death-promoting and death-suppressing Bcl-2 family members has led to a rheostat model in which the ratio of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins controls cell fate (4). Thus, pro-survival members exert their behavior by binding to and antagonizing death-promoting members. In general, the "BH3-only members" can bind to and antagonize the pro-survival proteins leading to increased apoptosis (5). While some redundancy of this system likely exists, tissue specificity, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of many of these family members can account for distinct physiological roles.

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: CD40, also known as tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 5 (TNFRSF5), is a type I transmembrane protein expressed on the surface of B cells and professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, as well as on several non-hematopoietic cell types and cancers (1-4). CD40 interacts with CD40 ligand (CD40L/TNFSF5), which is expressed primarily on activated T cells but has also been reported on blood platelets, mast cells, basophils, NK cells, and B cells (5). Upon engagement with CD40L, CD40 signals through TNF receptor associated factors and MAP kinase signaling pathways, resulting in a wide variety of immune and inflammatory responses, including dendritic cell activation and cross-presentation, T cell-dependent immunoglobulin class switching, memory B cell development, and germinal center formation (6-8). The CD40/CD40L axis is essential for the initiation and progression of cellular and humoral adaptive immunity, and is an important area of interest in the study of tumor immunology, neurodegenerative diseases, vascular diseases, and inflammatory disorders (9-12).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human and mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated p53 (1C12) Mouse mAb #2524.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$305
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. It is useful for the immunoprecipitation of DYKDDDDK-tagged proteins. CST expects that DYKDDDDK Tag (D6W5B) Rabbit mAb (Binds to same epitope as Sigma's Anti-Flag® M2 Antibody) (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) will display the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated antibody DYKDDDDK Tag (D6W5B) Rabbit mAb # 14793.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of PKC is one of the earliest events in a cascade leading to a variety of cellular responses such as secretion, gene expression, proliferation and muscle contraction (1,2). Protein kinase D (PKD), also called PKCμ, is a serine/threonine kinase whose activation is dependent on the phosphorylation of two activation loop sites, Ser744 and Ser748, via a PKC-dependent signaling pathway (3-5). In addition to the two activation loop sites, the carboxy-terminal Ser916 has been identified as an autophosphorylation site for PKD/PKCμ. Phosphorylation at Ser916 correlates with PKD/PKCμ catalytic activity (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Secretory proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during synthesis where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. To reach their native conformation, many secretory proteins require the formation of intra- or inter-molecular disulfide bonds (1). This process is called oxidative protein folding. Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has two thioredoxin homology domains and catalyzes the formation and isomerization of these disulfide bonds (2). Other ER resident proteins that possess thioredoxin homology domains, including ER stress protein 72 (ERp72), constitute the PDI family (3,4). ERp72 contains three thioredoxin homology domains (3) and plays a role in the formation and isomerization of disulfide bonds (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Basic leucine zipper transcriptional factor ATF-like (BATF) is a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor and is part of the AP-1/ATF family that forms inhibitory dimers with members of the Jun family (1-3). Expression of BATF is largely restricted with highest levels found in mature T cells, and it is induced in B cells following immune responses including viral infection (1,2). BATF expression is also induced by IL-6 via a Stat3-dependent mechanism (4). BATF plays an important role in the differentiation of immune cell lineages (5-7). Studies of BATF-deficient mice have demonstrated a critical role for BATF in the formation of IL-17-expressing Th17 cells, in part, by regulating the expression of IL-17 (5,6). BATF knockouts are resistant to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EEA), consistent with the role of Th17 cells in this model for autoimmunity (5). Additional studies have found that BATF is important in generating antibody class switching. BATF is required for the generation of follicular helper T cells (Tfh), by regulating BCL6 and c-Maf (6,7). In B cells, BATF controls the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and regulates class-switched antibody responses (7). Taken together, these studies suggest that BATF is a key regulator of distinct populations of immune cells.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation

Background: Cytochrome c is a well conserved electron-transport protein and is part of the respiratory chain localized to mitochondrial intermembrane space (1). Upon apoptotic stimulation, cytochrome c released from mitochondria associates with procaspase-9 (47 kDa)/Apaf 1. This complex processes caspase-9 from inactive proenzyme to its active form (2). This event further triggers caspase-3 activation and eventually leads to apoptosis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The mTORC1 kinase complex is a critical regulator of cell growth (1,2). Its activity is modulated by growth factors and nutrients including amino acids (1,2). MAP4K3 is a mediator between nutrient signal and mTORC1 (1). Research studies suggest that amino acid sufficiency leads to the phosphorylation of Ser170 on MAP4K3, which activates mTORC1 (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies (intracellular inclusions) and by the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Research studies have shown that mutations in α-synuclein, Parkin, and DJ-1 are linked to PD (1). α-synuclein is a major component of the aggregates found in Lewy bodies. Parkin is involved in protein degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and investigators have shown that mutations in Parkin cause early onset of PD (1). Loss-of-function mutations in DJ-1 cause early onset of PD, but DJ-1 is associated with multiple functions: it cooperates with Ras to increase cell transformation, it positively regulates transcription of the androgen receptor, and it may function as an indicator of oxidative stress (2-5). Dopamine D2 receptor-mediated functions are greatly impaired in DJ-1 (-/-) mice, resulting in reduced long-term depression (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HER3/ErbB3 is a member of the ErbB receptor protein tyrosine kinase family, but it lacks tyrosine kinase activity. Tyrosine phosphorylation of ErbB3 depends on its association with other ErbB tyrosine kinases. Upon ligand binding, heterodimers form between ErbB3 and other ErbB proteins, and ErbB3 is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues by the activated ErbB kinase (1,2). There are at least 9 potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the carboxy-terminal tail of ErbB3. These sites serve as consensus binding sites for signal transducing proteins, including Src family members, Grb2, and the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, which mediate ErbB downstream signaling (3). Both Tyr1222 and Tyr1289 of ErbB3 reside within a YXXM motif and participate in signaling to PI3K (4).Investigators have found that ErbB3 is highly expressed in many cancer cells (5) and activation of the ErbB3/PI3K pathway is correlated with malignant phenotypes of adenocarcinomas (6). Research studies have demonstrated that in tumor development, ErbB3 may function as an oncogenic unit together with other ErbB members (e.g. ErbB2 requires ErbB3 to drive breast tumor cell proliferation) (7). Thus, investigators view inhibiting interaction between ErbB3 and ErbB tyrosine kinases as a novel strategy for anti-tumor therapy.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2) are activated by ligands binding to a number of associated cytokine receptors (1). Upon cytokine receptor activation, Jak proteins become autophosphorylated and phosphorylate their associated receptors to provide multiple binding sites for signaling proteins. These associated signaling proteins, such as Stats (2), Shc (3), insulin receptor substrates (4), and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (5), typically contain SH2 or other phospho-tyrosine-binding domains.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-2 inducible T-cell kinase (Itk, Emt or Tsk) is a member of the non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases. Family members of Itk include Tec, Btk, Rlk and Bmx and are all defined by a common structure: an amino-terminal PH domain, a Tec-homology domain and a SH3 and SH2 domain followed by a carboxy-terminal kinase domain (1). Tec, Rlk and Itk are expressed in T cells and activated in response to T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. Data demonstrate that Itk functions in signal transduction downstream of TCR and activates PLCgamma1 and Erk. Lck directly activates Itk through phosphorylation in the conserved activation loop at Tyr511, and furthermore, Itk is autophosphorylated in the SH3 domain at Tyr180. Itk-Y180F is still capable of phosphorylating PLCgamma1 in contrast to Itk-Y511F, which has lost that function (2-3). Itk -/- mice show reduced lung inflammation, eosinophil infiltration and mucous production in response to allergic asthma induction. Thus, Itk could become a desirable target for anti-asthmatic treatments (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Calpain is a calcium-dependent thiol proteinase that is functionally active as a heterodimer composed of a small regulatory subunit and one of at least two large catalytic subunits (calpain 1 or calpain 2). In vitro, calpain 1 (mu-calpain) requires micromolar levels of calcium, while calpain 2 (M-calpain) requires millimolar levels of calcium for activation. The regulation of calpain in vivo is the subject of many current studies, which suggest that proteolytic activity is regulated post-transcriptionally by mechanisms such as calcium requirements, subcellular localization of the heterodimer, phosphorylation via the EGFR-Erk signaling cascade, endogenous inhibitors (calpastatin) and autoproteolytic cleavage (1). Calpastatin negatively regulates autoproteolytic cleavage of calpain 1 between Gly27 and Leu28 (2). Calpain influences cell migration by modifying rather than degrading its substrates responsible for cell adhesion and cytoskeletal arrangement. Control of calpain activity has caught the attention of drug development since limiting its activity could mute invasiveness of tumors or chronic inflammation (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: IDH2 is one of three isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDH1-3) that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to produce CO2 and α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). These enzymes belong to two distinct subclasses that utilize either NAD or NADP+ as an electron acceptor. IDH2 is an NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase expressed primarily in the mitochondria, where it also functions in the TCA cycle (1,2). Mutations in IDH2 or its cytoplasmic counterpart (IDH1) have been reported in glioblastoma multiforme (3), acute myeloid leukemia (4,5), and other malignancies (6). Research studies have shown that gain-of-function mutations in IDH2 can lead to the accumulation and secretion of the oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) in cancer cells (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The human retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are encoded by three distinct genes (RXRα, RXRβ, and RXRγ) and bind selectively and with high affinity to the vitamin A derivative, 9-cis-retinoic acid. RXRs are type-II nuclear hormone receptors that are largely localized to the nuclear compartment independent of ligand binding. Nuclear RXRs form heterodimers with nuclear hormone receptor subfamily 1 proteins, including thyroid hormone receptor, retinoic acid receptors, vitamin D receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, liver X receptors, and farnesoid X receptor (1). Since RXRs heterodimerize with multiple nuclear hormone receptors, they play a central role in transcriptional control of numerous hormonal signaling pathways by binding to cis-acting response elements in the promoter/enhancer region of target genes (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α, also known as TCF1 or MODY3) is a transcription factor that plays a role in the tissue-specific regulation of liver gene expression (1). Research has shown that heterogeneous mutations of HNF1α are linked to maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) (2). Recent studies indicate that increased concentrations of free fatty acids can reduce the expression of FoxA2/HNF3β and HNF1α in pancreatic β-cells and lead to their nuclear exclusion, resulting in symptoms of several metabolic syndromes (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Inhibitor of DNA-binding-2 (Id2) is a member of the Id proteins which belong to the helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein family. The Id protein functions by binding to specific transcription factors and preventing their dimerization and DNA binding (1-3). Id2 interacts with a wide variety of transcription factors including E proteins (5), TCS (4), Pax (6) and the tumor suppressor Rb (1). Id2 has been shown to be important in regulating cellular differentiation, proliferation, development and tumorgenesis (7-9). In tumor cells, increased levels of Id2 functionally inactivate Rb, leading to cellular transformation and cancer (10,11). Id2 is therefore a promising therapeutic target for treatment of cancer (12).