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Product listing: IKKβ Antibody, UniProt ID O14920 #2684 to Myosin IIb (D8H8) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P35580 #8824

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The NF-κB/Rel transcription factors are present in the cytosol in an inactive state, complexed with the inhibitory IκB proteins (1-3). Most agents that activate NF-κB do so through a common pathway based on phosphorylation-induced, proteasome-mediated degradation of IκB (3-7). The key regulatory step in this pathway involves activation of a high molecular weight IκB kinase (IKK) complex whose catalysis is generally carried out by three tightly associated IKK subunits. IKKα and IKKβ serve as the catalytic subunits of the kinase and IKKγ serves as the regulatory subunit (8,9). Activation of IKK depends upon phosphorylation at Ser177 and Ser181 in the activation loop of IKKβ (Ser176 and Ser180 in IKKα), which causes conformational changes, resulting in kinase activation (10-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2 kinase. The critical regulatory step in activating cdc2 during progression into mitosis appears to be dephosphorylation of Tyr15 and Thr14 (1,2). Phosphorylation at Tyr15 and Thr14 and inhibition of cdc2 is carried out by Wee1 and Myt1 protein kinases, while Tyr15 dephosphorylation and activation of cdc2 is carried out by the cdc25 phosphatase (1,3,4). Hyperphosphorylation and inactivation of Myt1 in mitosis suggests that one or more kinases activated at the G2/M transition negatively regulates Myt1 activity. Kinases shown to phosphorylate Myt1 include cdc2, p90RSK, Akt, and Plk1 (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Flotillins belong to a family of lipid raft-associated integral membrane proteins that carry an evolutionarily conserved domain called the prohibitin homology domain (PHB) (1). Flotillin members are ubiquitously expressed and located in noncaveolar microdomains (lipid rafts) on the plasma membrane where they support signal transduction and regulate lipid raft motility and localization (2-5). Two flotillin members have been described, flotillin-1 and flotillin-2. In addition to its colocalization with lipid rafts on the plasma membrane, flotillin-1 also has been found in compartments of the endocytic and autophagosomal pathways, such as recycling/late endosomes, the Golgi complex, and the nucleus (6,7). Flotillin-2 is mainly localized to the plasma membrane and is prevalent in cell-cell contact sites. However, overexpressed flotillin-2 has also been found in the late endosome (4,8,9). Both flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 are commonly used as lipid raft-associated markers.

$232
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PD-L1 (E1L3N®) XP® Rabbit mAb #13684.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1, B7-H1, CD274) is a member of the B7 family of cell surface ligands that regulate T cell activation and immune responses. The PD-L1 ligand binds the PD-1 transmembrane receptor and inhibits T cell activation. PD-L1 was discovered following a search for novel B7 protein homologs and was later shown to be expressed by antigen presenting cells, activated T cells, and tissues including placenta, heart, and lung (1-3). Similar in structure to related B7 family members, PD-L1 protein contains extracellular IgV and IgC domains and a short, cytoplasmic region. Research studies demonstrate that PD-L1 is expressed in several tumor types, including melanoma, ovary, colon, lung, breast, and renal cell carcinomas (4-6). Expression of PD-L1 in cancer is associated with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, which mediate PD-L1 expression through the release of interferon gamma (7). Additional research links PD-L1 expression to cancers associated with viral infections (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) catalyze protein ubiquitination, a reversible process countered by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUB) action (1,2). There are five DUB subfamilies including the USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM enzymes. USP1 belongs to the USP subfamily and is regulated in a cell cycle dependent manner by both transcriptional and ubiquitin-proteosomal mechanisms (3). USP1 is a nuclear protein and localizes to chromatin where it is specifically associated with FANCD2. USP1 deubiquitinates monoubiquitinated FANCD2, which plays an important role in DNA damage repair and Chk1 protein stability (3,4). Another important target of USP1 is PCNA. USP1 deubiquitinates monoubiquitinated PCNA, thereby negatively regulating PCNA-mediated translesion synthesis (TLS) during DNA repair (5). USP1 interaction with UAF1, a WD40 repeat-containing protein, leads to formation of an activated USP1/UAF1 complex, which is required for the deubiquitinase activity of USP1 (6,7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Nestin is an intermediate filament family member protein that is structurally related to the neurofilament proteins (1). It is highly expressed in the developing brain, where it may help to regulate cell structure and intracellular processes required for neural cell division and migration (1,2). Upon maturation of the brain, nestin expression is quickly down-regulated and replaced by expression of the neurofilament proteins (2). Because nestin is expressed in both mature and precursor neuronal and glial cells, as well as in the developing brain and in the brain and spinal cord following damage, nestin is widely accepted as a marker of neural stem/progenitor cells (3). Research studies have shown that expression of nestin is also found in cells from various nervous system tumors, including gliomas, neuroblastomas, astrocytomas, and it is generally accepted as a marker for neural cancer stem cells (3). However, nestin expression has also been observed in astrocytes, retina, cardiac muscle, pancreas, and other tissues (3). Therefore, the acceptance of nestin as an exclusive marker of neural stem/progenitor cells is not unanimous.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

This kit contains reagents to examine the activation state and total protein levels of key components in the noncanonical NF-κB pathway: TRAF2, TRAF3, NIK, IKKα, p100, and RelB.
The Glycolysis II Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate select enzymes involved in glycolysis. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blot experiments per primary antibody.
$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Akt (Thr308) (D25E6) XP® Rabbit mAb #13038.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
Cell Signaling Technology Antibody conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct Flow Cytometric analysis of human and mouse cells. The unconjugated antibody #9255 reacts with, among others, human, mouse, rat and hamster phospho-SAPK/JNK (Thr183/Tyr185). CST expects that Phospho-SAPK/JNK (Thr183/Tyr185) (G9) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate) will also recognize phospho-SAPK/JNK (Thr183/Tyr185) in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mouse, Rat, S. cerevisiae

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The stress-activated protein kinase/Jun-amino-terminal kinase SAPK/JNK is potently and preferentially activated by a variety of environmental stresses including UV and gamma radiation, ceramides, inflammatory cytokines, and in some instances, growth factors and GPCR agonists (1-6). As with the other MAPKs, the core signaling unit is composed of a MAPKKK, typically MEKK1-MEKK4, or by one of the mixed lineage kinases (MLKs), which phosphorylate and activate MKK4/7. Upon activation, MKKs phosphorylate and activate the SAPK/JNK kinase (2). Stress signals are delivered to this cascade by small GTPases of the Rho family (Rac, Rho, cdc42) (3). Both Rac1 and cdc42 mediate the stimulation of MEKKs and MLKs (3). Alternatively, MKK4/7 can be activated in a GTPase-independent mechanism via stimulation of a germinal center kinase (GCK) family member (4). There are three SAPK/JNK genes each of which undergoes alternative splicing, resulting in numerous isoforms (3). SAPK/JNK, when active as a dimer, can translocate to the nucleus and regulate transcription through its effects on c-Jun, ATF-2, and other transcription factors (3,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tyk2 is a member of the Jak family of protein tyrosine kinases. It associates with and is activated by receptors for many cytokines including IL-13, the IL-6 family, IL-10, and IFN-α and β (1-3). Following ligand binding, Tyk2 is activated by phosphorylation of Tyr1054 and/or Tyr1055 (4). Tyk2 is required for the tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat3 in the IFN-β signaling cascade (5).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Cleaved PARP (Asp214) (D64E10) XP® Rabbit mAb #5625.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Histone H2A.X (Ser139) (20E3) Rabbit mAb #9718.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Histone H2A.X is a variant histone that represents approximately 10% of the total H2A histone proteins in normal human fibroblasts (1). H2A.X is required for checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest and DNA repair following double-stranded DNA breaks (1). DNA damage, caused by ionizing radiation, UV-light, or radiomimetic agents, results in rapid phosphorylation of H2A.X at Ser139 by PI3K-like kinases, including ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK (2,3). Within minutes following DNA damage, H2A.X is phosphorylated at Ser139 at sites of DNA damage (4). This very early event in the DNA-damage response is required for recruitment of a multitude of DNA-damage response proteins, including MDC1, NBS1, RAD50, MRE11, 53BP1, and BRCA1 (1). In addition to its role in DNA-damage repair, H2A.X is required for DNA fragmentation during apoptosis and is phosphorylated by various kinases in response to apoptotic signals. H2A.X is phosphorylated at Ser139 by DNA-PK in response to cell death receptor activation, c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK1) in response to UV-A irradiation, and p38 MAPK in response to serum starvation (5-8). H2A.X is constitutively phosphorylated on Tyr142 in undamaged cells by WSTF (Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor) (9,10). Upon DNA damage, and concurrent with phosphorylation of Ser139, Tyr142 is dephosphorylated at sites of DNA damage by recruited EYA1 and EYA3 phosphatases (9). While phosphorylation at Ser139 facilitates the recruitment of DNA repair proteins and apoptotic proteins to sites of DNA damage, phosphorylation at Tyr142 appears to determine which set of proteins are recruited. Phosphorylation of H2A.X at Tyr142 inhibits the recruitment of DNA repair proteins and promotes binding of pro-apoptotic factors such as JNK1 (9). Mouse embryonic fibroblasts expressing only mutant H2A.X Y142F, which favors recruitment of DNA repair proteins over apoptotic proteins, show a reduced apoptotic response to ionizing radiation (9). Thus, it appears that the balance of H2A.X Tyr142 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation provides a switch mechanism to determine cell fate after DNA damage.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Three distinct types of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) have been characterized. Unlike other PI3Ks, PI3K class III catalyzes the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol at the D3 position, producing phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PIP3) (1). PI3K class III is the mammalian homolog of Vps34, first identified in yeast. PI3K class III interacts with the regular subunit p150, the mammalian homolog of Vps15, which regulates cellular membrane association through myristoylation (2,3). PIP3 recruits several proteins with FYVE or PX domains to membranes regulating vesicular transport and protein sorting (4). Moreover, PI3K class III has been shown to regulate autophagy, trimeric G-protein signaling, and the mTOR nutrient-sensing pathway (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) family proteins exist as several disulphide-bonded, dimeric isoforms (PDGF AA, PDGF AB, PDGF BB, PDGF CC, and PDGF DD) that bind in a specific pattern to two closely related receptor tyrosine kinases, PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα) and PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ). PDGFRα and PDGFRβ share 75% to 85% sequence homology between their two intracellular kinase domains, while the kinase insert and carboxy-terminal tail regions display a lower level (27% to 28%) of homology (1). PDGFRα homodimers bind all PDGF isoforms except those containing PDGF D. PDGFRβ homodimers bind PDGF BB and DD isoforms, as well as the PDGF AB heterodimer. The heteromeric PDGF receptor α/β binds PDGF B, C, and D homodimers, as well as the PDGF AB heterodimer (2). PDGFRα and PDGFRβ can each form heterodimers with EGFR, which is also activated by PDGF (3). Various cells differ in the total number of receptors present and in the receptor subunit composition, which may account for responsive differences among cell types to PDGF binding (4). Ligand binding induces receptor dimerization and autophosphorylation, followed by binding and activation of cytoplasmic SH2 domain-containing signal transduction molecules, such as GRB2, Src, GAP, PI3 kinase, PLCγ, and NCK. A number of different signaling pathways are initiated by activated PDGF receptors and lead to control of cell growth, actin reorganization, migration, and differentiation (5). Tyr751 in the kinase-insert region of PDGFRβ is the docking site for PI3 kinase (6). Phosphorylated pentapeptides derived from Tyr751 of PDGFRβ (pTyr751-Val-Pro-Met-Leu) inhibit the association of the carboxy-terminal SH2 domain of the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase with PDGFRβ (7). Tyr740 is also required for PDGFRβ-mediated PI3 kinase activation (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase 2 (CaMKK2) is a member of the CaMK family that contains a central Ser/Thr kinase domain followed by a regulatory domain consisting of overlapping autoinhibitory and CaM-binding regions (1). CaMKK2 can be distinguished from other CaMK family members by the presence of a unique Pro/Arg/Gly-rich insert following the ATP-binding domain (2). CaMKK2 phosphorylates CaMKI at Thr177 and CaMKIV at Thr200 (3). CaMKK2 also phosphorylates AMPKα in response to calcium (4). CaMKK2 has been implicated in long-term memory formation (5) and adipocyte development (6). CaMKK2 is phosphorylated at Ser511 by death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) in a signaling cascade thought to be involved in neuronal death (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Chk1 kinase acts downstream of ATM/ATR kinase and plays an important role in DNA damage checkpoint control, embryonic development, and tumor suppression (1). Activation of Chk1 involves phosphorylation at Ser317 and Ser345 by ATM/ATR, followed by autophosphorylation of Ser296. Activation occurs in response to blocked DNA replication and certain forms of genotoxic stress (2). While phosphorylation at Ser345 serves to localize Chk1 to the nucleus following checkpoint activation (3), phosphorylation at Ser317 along with site-specific phosphorylation of PTEN allows for re-entry into the cell cycle following stalled DNA replication (4). Chk1 exerts its checkpoint mechanism on the cell cycle, in part, by regulating the cdc25 family of phosphatases. Chk1 phosphorylation of cdc25A targets it for proteolysis and inhibits its activity through 14-3-3 binding (5). Activated Chk1 can inactivate cdc25C via phosphorylation at Ser216, blocking the activation of cdc2 and transition into mitosis (6). Centrosomal Chk1 has been shown to phosphorylate cdc25B and inhibit its activation of CDK1-cyclin B1, thereby abrogating mitotic spindle formation and chromatin condensation (7). Furthermore, Chk1 plays a role in spindle checkpoint function through regulation of aurora B and BubR1 (8). Research studies have implicated Chk1 as a drug target for cancer therapy as its inhibition leads to cell death in many cancer cell lines (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Estrogen receptor α (ERα), a member of the steroid receptor superfamily, contains highly conserved DNA binding and ligand binding domains (1). Through its estrogen-independent and estrogen-dependent activation domains (AF-1 and AF-2, respectively), ERα regulates transcription by recruiting coactivator proteins and interacting with general transcriptional machinery (2). Phosphorylation at multiple sites provides an important mechanism to regulate ERα activity (3-5). Ser104, 106, 118, and 167 are located in the amino-terminal transcription activation function domain AF-1, and phosphorylation of these serine residues plays an important role in regulating ERα activity. Ser118 may be the substrate of the transcription regulatory kinase CDK7 (5). Ser167 may be phosphorylated by p90RSK and Akt (4,6). According to the research literature, phosphorylation at Ser167 may confer tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer patients (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PAI-1 is a secreted protein that belongs to the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. It inhibits urokinase and tissue plasminogen activators (uPA and tPA) and thus, reduces the conversion of inactive plasminogen to plasmin (1). PAI-1 regulates fibrinolysis and plays an important role in vessel patency and tissue remodeling. Secreted PAI-1 interacts with the extracellular matrix (ECM) component vitronectin, thereby modulating cell-ECM interactions (2,3). PAI-1 is expressed in a variety of tissues with higher expression in liver, vascular endothelial cells, platelets, macrophages, and adipose tissue (1). Increased levels of PAI-1 are associated with deep vein thrombosis (4). Defects in PAI-1 cause plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency (PAI-1D), which is characterized by increased bleeding after injury or surgery (5). Research studies have shown that high levels of PAI-1 are associated with obesity, aging, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (6-8). PAI-1 is transcriptionally regulated by TGF-β and mediates TGF-β-induced inhibition of cell migration and invasion in cancer cells (9). Studies have shown PAI-1 to be also involved in fibrosis (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GAP43 is a nervous system specific, growth-associated protein enriched in growth cones and areas of high plasticity (1). Phosphorylation of GAP43 at Ser41 by PKC is regulated by intracellular Ca2+ and affects the ability of GAP43 to bind calmodulin (2,3). GAP43 is integral to growth cone formation, neurite outgrowth, and the development of a functional cerebral cortex (4,5). Aberrant GAP43 expression can be seen in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and a metalloprotease) family of multidomain membrane proteins influence cell signaling and adhesion by shedding cell surface proteins, such as cytokines and growth factors. This process influences cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion and ECM remodeling. Conserved domains found in most ADAM family proteins include a prodomain, a zinc-dependent metalloprotease domain, a disintegrin domain, a carboxy-terminal cysteine-rich domain, an EGF-like sequence, and a short cytoplasmic tail (1,2).The ADAM metallopeptidase domain 10 (ADAM10) is a plasma membrane proteinase that cleaves membrane-bound proteins targeted for regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP). The ADAM10 prodomain acts as a chaperone that stabilizes mature ADAM protein folding, and prevents target-protein shedding through inhibition of ADAM10 proteinase activity (3,4). Mature ADAM10 is the major α-secretase responsible for cleavage of Notch, APP, cadherins, and prion protein (5-7). The ADAM10 protein cleaves receptor tyrosine kinases and their associated ligands and displays a wide range of regulatory functions across related signaling pathways (8). Research studies using knockout mice demonstrate that loss of ADAM10 results in defects in cortex formation, lymphocyte development, and cardiovascular development (9-11). Increased ADAM10 protein expression correlates with progression of many types of cancer (i.e. gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and brain glioma), due to increased cancer cell migration, metastasis, and invasion (12-14). Mutations in the corresponding ADAM10 gene result in a rare, autosomal dominant pigmentation disorder known as reticulate acropigmentation of Kitamura (15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3, AML2), a member of the Runt family of transcription factors, plays an important role in the suppression of gastric epithelium cell proliferation (1), dorsal root ganglia neurogenesis (2), and T cell differentiation (3,4). RUNX3 is also involved in caspase-3-dependent apoptosis (5). Protein complexes containing RUNX3 and various transcription factors, such as Smads or β-catenin/TCF4, have tumor suppressor activity and regulate downstream target gene transcription (6,7). While typically localized to the nucleus, RUNX3 can be tyrosine phosphorylated and located in the cytoplasm of many cancer cells. This mislocalization of RUNX3 abolishes its tumor suppressor function and contributes to tumorigenesis (8). Research studies indicate that gene silencing or protein mislocalization inactivates RUNX3 in more than 80% of gastric cancers and other cancer types (1,9,10).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mink, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is characterized by growth retardation, mental disability, immunodeficiency, defects in cell cycle checkpoints, an increased propensity for cancer, and sensitivity to ionizing radiation (1). Repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks is dependent on the multifunctional MRN complex containing Mre11, Rad50, and the NBS1 gene product p95/NBS1 (also called p95 or nibrin) (2). p95/NBS1 is a protein with a forkhead-associated domain and a BRCT repeat that regulate interaction with MDC1 and are essential for proper G2/M DNA-damage checkpoint function (3). NBS1 is critical for homologous recombination following DNA double strand breaks. This activity requires CDK-dependent association with CtIP and subsequent phosphorylation by ATM (4). ATM interacts with and phosphorylates p95/NBS1 at Ser278 and Ser343 after exposure to ionizing radiation (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter dopamine and other catecholamines. TH functions as a tetramer, with each subunit composed of a regulatory and catalytic domain, and exists in several different isoforms (1,2). This enzyme is required for embryonic development since TH knockout mice die before or at birth (3). Levels of transcription, translation and posttranslational modification regulate TH activity. The amino-terminal regulatory domain contains three serine residues: Ser9, Ser31 and Ser40. Phosphorylation at Ser40 by PKA positively regulates the catalytic activity of TH (4-6). Phosphorylation at Ser31 by CDK5 also increases the catalytic activity of TH through stabilization of TH protein levels (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family includes the retinoblastoma protein Rb (p105), retinoblastoma-like protein 1 (RBL1, p107), and retinoblastoma-like protein 2 (RBL2, p130). These Rb family proteins are referred to as ‘pocket proteins’ because they contain a conserved binding pocket region that interacts with critical regulatory proteins, including E2F family transcription factors, c-Abl tyrosine kinase, and proteins containing a conserved LXCXE motif (1,2). In quiescent G0 phase cells, active Rb proteins are hypophosphorylated and bind to E2F transcription factors to repress transcription and inhibit cell cycle progression (1,2). Upon growth factor induction of quiescent cells, Rb proteins become hyperphosphorylated and inactivated by G1-phase cyclinD-cdk4/6, G1/S-phase cyclin E-cdk2, and G1/S-phase cyclin A-cdk2 complexes (1,2). Hyperphosphorylation of Rb proteins results in a loss of E2F binding and allows for transcriptional activation and cell cycle progression (1,2). In addition to regulating the cell cycle, Rb proteins regulate chromosome stability, induction, and maintenance of senescence, apoptosis, cellular differentiation, and angiogenesis (3).Retinoblastoma-like protein 2 (RBL2, p130) is the most predominant and active Rb family member found in quiescent cells. In these cells, RBL2 interacts with E2F4 and E2F5 to recruit the DP, RB-like, E2F, and MuvB protein (DREAM) complex to E2F target genes to repress transcription of multiple genes required for progression into S phase and mitosis (4-6). Hypophosphorylation of RBL2 during cellular senescence is required for maintenance of senescent cells (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: NKX2.5 is a member of the NKX homeobox transcription factor family. NKX2.5 plays an essential role in heart development and is among the earliest factors expressed in the cardiac lineage in developing embryos. Targeted disruption of the murine Nkx2.5 gene results in abnormal heart morphogenesis, severe growth retardation, and embryonic lethality around E9.5 (1,2). Mutations in NKX2.5 are likewise associated with several congenital heart conditions, such as atrial defect with atrioventricular conduction defects (ASD-AVCD) and Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) (3,4). Transcriptional activation of NKX2.5 is also associated with some B and T cell leukemias that result from chromosomal translocation (5-8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) binds to the mRNA cap structure to mediate the initiation of translation (1,2). eIF4E interacts with eIF4G, a scaffold protein that promotes assembly of eIF4E and eIF4A into the eIF4F complex (2). eIF4B is thought to assist the eIF4F complex in translation initiation. Upon activation by mitogenic and/or stress stimuli mediated by Erk and p38 MAPK, Mnk1 phosphorylates eIF4E at Ser209 in vivo (3,4). Two Erk and p38 MAPK phosphorylation sites in mouse Mnk1 (Thr197 and Thr202) are essential for Mnk1 kinase activity (3). The carboxy-terminal region of eIF4G also contains serum-stimulated phosphorylation sites, including Ser1108, Ser1148, and Ser1192 (5). Phosphorylation at these sites is blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 and by the FRAP/mTOR inhibitor rapamycin.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).