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Product listing: RSK2 (D21B2) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P51812 #5528 to 14-3-3 Family Antibody Sampler Kit, UniProt ID P27348 #9769

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinases (RSK1-4) are a family of widely expressed Ser/Thr kinases characterized by two nonidentical, functional kinase domains (1) and a carboxy-terminal docking site for extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) (2). Several sites both within and outside of the RSK kinase domain, including Ser380, Thr359, Ser363, and Thr573, are important for kinase activation (3). RSK1-3 are activated via coordinated phosphorylation by MAPKs, autophosphorylation, and phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K) in response to many growth factors, polypeptide hormones, and neurotransmitters (3).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Smac/Diablo is a 21 kDa mammalian mitochondrial protein that functions as a regulatory component during apoptosis (1,2). Upon mitochondrial stress, Smac/Diablo is released from mitochondria and competes with caspases for binding of IAPs (inhibitor of apoptosis proteins) (1,2). The interaction of Smac/Diablo with IAPs relieves the inhibitory effect of the IAPs on caspases (3,4). This interaction involves mainly the amino-terminal residues of Smac/Diablo with the BIR3 region of XIAP, supplemented with several other hydrophobic interactions between the helical structures of Smac/Diablo and other areas of BIR3 (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Thyroid Transcription Factor 1 (TTF-1, also known as NKX2-1), a member of the NKX homeobox transcription factor family, was initially discovered in the FRTL-5 rat thyroid cell line (1). Subsequent studies have shown that TTF-1 plays an important role in differentiation and morphogenesis of the developing thyroid, lung, and ventral forebrain (2). TTF-1 controls the expression of several genes, some of which are tissue specific, such as: thyroglobulin, thyroperoxidase, and the thyrotropin receptor in the thyroid; and surfactant proteins and clara cell secretory protein in the lung (2,3). Investigators have found that TTF-1 is expressed in malignant tumors of the thyroid and lung, and it is commonly used as a marker for both primary and malignant lung cancers (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: In steroidogenic tissues, such as the adrenal cortex, testis, ovary, and placenta, all steroids are synthesized from the common precursor cholesterol. Two families of steroidogenic enzymes, cytochrome P450 hydroxylase enzymes (CYP) and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSD), catalyze the production of most steroids. There are six distinct steroid hydroxylases, which are cytochrome P450 enzymes encoded by the steroidogenic CYP gene family (1). The cytochrome P450scc (cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme) encoded by CYP11A1 catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis, conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone (2).CYP11A1, located in the inner membrane of mitochondria, cooperates with two coenzymes, ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase, to carry out three successive oxidation-reduction reactions of cholesterol (3-5). In the adrenal cortex, testis, and ovary, CYP11A1 expression is regulated by the cAMP-PKA pathway (6), and the transcription factor SF1/NR5A1 has been shown to play a central role in mediating the cAMP signal on the CYP11A1 promoter within steroidogeneic cells of the adrenal cortex and gonads (7). Defects in CYP11A1 are the cause of adrenal insufficiency congenital with 46, XY sex reversal (AICSR), which is a rare disorder that can present as acute adrenal insufficiency in infancy or childhood (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: mTORC1 kinase complex is a critical component in the regulation of cell growth (1,2). Its activity is modulated by energy levels, growth factors, and amino acids (3,4). The four related GTPases, RagA, RagB, RagC, and RagD, have been shown to interact with raptor in mTORC1 (1,2). These interactions are both necessary and sufficient for mTORC1 activation in response to amino acid signals (1,2). A protein complex consisting of LAMTOR1/C11orf59, LAMTOR2/ROBLD3, and LAMTOR3/MAPKSP1 has been identified to interact with and recruit the four Rag GTPases to the surface of lysosomes (5).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: c-Kit is a member of the subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that includes PDGF, CSF-1, and FLT3/flk-2 receptors (1,2). It plays a critical role in activation and growth in a number of cell types including hematopoietic stem cells, mast cells, melanocytes, and germ cells (3). Upon binding with its stem cell factor (SCF) ligand, c-Kit undergoes dimerization/oligomerization and autophosphorylation. Activation of c-Kit results in the recruitment and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream SH2-containing signaling components including PLCγ, the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, and CrkL (4). Molecular lesions that impair the kinase activity of c-Kit are associated with a variety of developmental disorders (5), and mutations that constitutively activate c-Kit can lead to pathogenesis of mastocytosis and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (6). Tyr719 is located in the kinase insert region of the catalytic domain. c-Kit phosphorylated at Tyr719 binds to the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase in vitro and in vivo (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The aldehyde dehydrogenase family is a large group of enzymes that oxidize aldehydes formed through metabolic processes to their carboxylic acids (1). ALDH1A1 is a liver cytosolic isoform of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and is involved in the major pathway of alcohol metabolism along with alcohol dehydrogenase (2). ALDH1A1 is also known as retinal dehydrogenase 1 and is involved in retinol metabolism, converting retinol to retinoic acid (3). Recent studies suggest that control of retinoid signaling through ALDH1A1 may influence hematopoietic stem cell differentiation (4). There has been recent interest in ALDH1 isoforms as predictive biomarkers in disease. Several studies have suggested that ALDH1A1 is a potential marker for cancer stem cells and chemoresistance in several tumor types, such as melanoma (5), lung cancer (6), and glioblastoma (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: In response to cytokines, stress, and chemotactic factors, MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAPK-2) is rapidly phosphorylated and activated. It has been shown that MAPKAPK-2 is a direct target of p38 MAPK (1). Multiple residues of MAPKAPK-2 are phosphorylated in vivo in response to stress. However, only four residues (Thr25, Thr222, Ser272, and Thr334) are phosphorylated by p38 MAPK in an in vitro kinase assay (2). Phosphorylation at Thr222, Ser272, and Thr334 appears to be essential for the activity of MAPKAPK-2 (2). Thr25 is phosphorylated by p42 MAPK in vitro, but is not required for the activation of MAPKAPK-2 (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dickkopf (DKK) family proteins consist of four members DKK1, DKK2, DKK3 and DKK4 that function as secreted Wnt antagonists by inhibiting Wnt coreceptors LRP5 and LRP6 (1,2). DKKs contain two cysteine-rich domains in which the positions of 10 cysteine residues are well conserved (3). Their expression is both temporally and spatially regulated during animal development (4). DKKs also bind with high affinity to transmembrane proteins Kremen1 and 2, which themselves also modulate Wnt signaling (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ASF1 was first identified in S. cerevisiae based on its ability to de-repress transcriptional silencing when overexpressed (1). While only one gene exists in yeast and Drosophila, mammalian cells contain the two highly homologous ASF1A and ASF1B genes (2). ASF1A and ASF1B function as histone chaperones, delivering histone H3/H4 dimers to CAF-1 or HIRA histone deposition complexes to facilitate replication-coupled and replication-independent nucleosome assembly on DNA (2-5). Both ASF1A and ASF1B bind to CAF-1, but only ASF1A binds to HIRA (5). In addition to playing a role in DNA replication and gene silencing, ASF1 functions in DNA damage repair, genome stability and cellular senescence. Deletion of ASF1 in yeast and Drosophila confers sensitivity to various DNA damaging agents and inhibitors of DNA replication, increases genomic instability and sister chromatid exchange, and activates the DNA damage checkpoint (6-8). Depletion of both ASF1A and ASF1B in mammalian cells results in the accumulation of cells in S phase, increased phosphorylation of H2A.X, centrosome amplification and apoptosis (9,10). ASF1A is required for the formation of senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (SAHF), with overexpression of ASF1A inducing senescence in primary cells (4). Both ASF1A and ASF1B are phosphorylated in S phase by the Tousled-like kinases TLK1 and TLK2, and are dephosphorylated when TLK1 and TLK2 are inactivated by Chk1 kinase in response to replicative stress (11,12). The function of ASF1 phosphorylation is not yet understood.

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Antigen receptors found on the surface of B cells contain a heterodimeric signaling component composed of CD79A and CD79B, also known as Ig α and Ig β, respectively (1,2). Presence of this receptor complex is essential for B-cell development and function (3). Together these two proteins and the associated B cell receptor initiate intracellular signaling following antigen binding (4,5). An immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) found in the CD79A intracellular region appears to be important for its function (6). Antigen binding precedes formation of the CD79A and CD79B heterodimer and subsequent activation of receptor associated kinases (7). Research has shown that CD79A is a marker for B-lineage lymphoblastic leukemia (8). Additionally, investigators have found that mutations in the CD79A (MB1) gene are associated with abnormally low levels of functional B cell receptors in some cases of chronic B cell lymphocytic leukemia (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-5 (Ich-3/ICErelIII/TY) is a member of the caspase family of cysteine proteases that play a key role in the execution of apoptosis and activation of inflammatory cytokines (1-3). Caspase-5 is widely expressed, with highest expression observed in placenta and lung (1). Interferon-γ and LPS regulate expression of caspase-5 (2,4). Members of the caspase-1 subfamily of caspases, which includes caspase-4, -5, and murine caspase-11 and -12, can induce apoptosis when over-expressed and mediate the proteolytic activation of inflammatory cytokines (5). Processing of IL-1β occurs through the activation of an inflammasome complex consisting of caspase-1, caspase-5, Pycard and NALP1 (6). Transcription factor Max, a component of the Myc/Mad/Max network, is cleaved by caspase-5 during Fas-induced apoptosis (7). Several alternative spliced variants of caspase-5 have been identified (8). Frameshift mutations of caspase-5 have been observed in leukemia, lymphoma (9), and colorectal cancers (10).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen is a polysaccharide of glucose and serves as an energy storage in mammalian muscle and liver (1). Glycogen synthase catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen biosynthesis and has two major isoforms in mammals -- muscle isoform (GYS1) and liver isoform (GYS2) respectively (1). Glycogen synthase kinase-3α (GSK-3α) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylate glycogen synthase at multiple sites in its C-terminus (Ser641, Ser645, Ser649 and Ser653) inhibiting its activity (2, 3). Hypoxia alters glycogen metabolism including temporal changes of GYS1 expression and phosphorylation in cancer cells, suggesting the role of metabolic reprogramming of glycogen metabolism in cancer growth (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a widely conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in many cellular programs, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, and death. The p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) signaling pathway can be activated in response to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli including mitogens, growth factors, and cytokines (1-3), and research investigators consider it an important target in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer (4). Upon stimulation, a sequential three-part protein kinase cascade is initiated, consisting of a MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK or MAP3K), a MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK or MAP2K), and a MAP kinase (MAPK). Multiple p44/42 MAP3Ks have been identified, including members of the Raf family, as well as Mos and Tpl2/COT. MEK1 and MEK2 are the primary MAPKKs in this pathway (5,6). MEK1 and MEK2 activate p44 and p42 through phosphorylation of activation loop residues Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr185/Tyr187, respectively. Several downstream targets of p44/42 have been identified, including p90RSK (7) and the transcription factor Elk-1 (8,9). p44/42 are negatively regulated by a family of dual-specificity (Thr/Tyr) MAPK phosphatases, known as DUSPs or MKPs (10), along with MEK inhibitors, such as U0126 and PD98059.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Rab11a, Rab11b and Rab25 are members of the Rab11 family of small Ras-like GTPases. Rab11 (isoforms Rab11a and Rab11b) functions as a key regulator in the recycling of perinuclear, plasma membrane and Golgi compartment endosomes (1,2). Despite some overlap, distinct differences exist between Rab11a and Rab11b in both their cellular distribution and functional roles. Rab11a is ubiquitously expressed while Rab11b is found mainly in the heart and brain (3,4). Like other Rab proteins, Rab11 exerts its function via interactions with Rab11 family interacting proteins (FIPs). While there are three distinct classes of FIPs, all appear to share a conserved carboxy-terminal Rab-binding domain that allows Rab-FIP protein interaction. When bound together, these proteins are thought to regulate membrane-associated protein sorting (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The protein inhibitor of activated Stat (PIAS) proteins, which include PIAS1, PIAS3, PIASx, and PIASy, were originally characterized based on their interaction with the Stat family of transcription factors (1,2). PIAS1, PIAS3, and PIASx interact with and repress Stat1, Stat3, and Stat4, respectively (1-3). Deletion of PIAS1 leads to inhibition of interferon-inducible genes and increased protection against infection (4). The PIAS family contains a conserved RING domain that has been linked to a function as a small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) ligase, coupling the SUMO conjugating enzyme Ubc9 with its substrate proteins (5,6). Numerous studies have now shown that PIAS family members can regulate the activity of transcription factors through distinct mechanisms, including NF-κB (7,8), c-Jun, p53 (5,9), Oct-4 (10), and Smads (11,12). The activity of PIAS1 is regulated by both phosphorylation and arginine methylation. Inflammatory stimuli can induce IKK-mediated phosphorylation of PIAS1 at Ser90, which is required for its activity (13). In addition, PRMT1 induces arginine methylation of PIAS1 at Arg303 following interferon treatment and is associated with its repressive activity on Stat1 (14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Western Blotting

Background: Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor that is most widely known for its roles in melanocyte, ophthalmic, and osteoclast development (1-3). In humans, MITF can function as a melanoma oncogene (4) and mutations in the corresponding MITF gene are associated with Waardenburg syndrome type 2, an auditory-pigmentary syndrome characterized by developmental defects in cells derived from neural crest (5). At least 12 isoforms of MITF have been identified, which exhibit differential patterns of expression among cell and tissue types (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Arrestin proteins function as negative regulators of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Cognate ligand binding stimulates GPCR phosphorylation, which is followed by binding of arrestin to the phosphorylated GPCR and the eventual internalization of the receptor and desensitization of GPCR signaling (1). Four distinct mammalian arrestin proteins are known. Arrestin 1 (also known as S-arrestin) and arrestin 4 (X-arrestin) are localized to retinal rods and cones, respectively. Arrestin 2 (also known as β-arrestin 1) and arrestin 3 (β-arrestin 2) are ubiquitously expressed and bind to most GPCRs (2). β-arrestins function as adaptor and scaffold proteins and play important roles in other processes, such as recruiting c-Src family proteins to GPCRs in Erk activation pathways (3,4). β-arrestins are also involved in some receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways (5-8). Additional evidence suggests that β-arrestins translocate to the nucleus and help regulate transcription by binding transcriptional cofactors (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: β-galactosidase (also known as β-gal) is an essential hydrolase enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of galactose-containing carbohydrates into monosaccharides. Substrates of β-galactosides include lactose, various glycoproteins, ganglioside GM1, and lactosylceramides. β-galactosidase is used widely in molecular biology; for example, isolation of recombinant bacteria during molecular cloning utilizes α-complementation of the bacterial β-galactosidase gene (lacZ) in the presence of a β-gal substrate to identify recombinant clones (1). In cell biology, Senescence-Associated beta-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), defined as β-gal activity at pH 6.0, is a widely used marker of replicative senescence. While initially thought to derive from a unique isoform of β-galactosidase expressed specifically in senescent cells (2), SA-β-gal activity was subsequently shown to result from overexpression and accumulation of β-galactosidase in endogenous lysosomes, and is not specifically required for replicative senescence (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the pre-synaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g. NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing post-synaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels. In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion. Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) are characterized: EAAT2 (GLT-1) is primarily expressed in astrocytes but is also expressed in neurons of the retina and during fetal development (1). Homozygous EAAT2 knockout mice have spontaneous, lethal seizures and an increased predisposition to acute cortical injury (2). PKC phosphorylates Ser113 of EAAT2 and coincides with glutamate transport (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Damaged DNA-Binding Protein (DDB) consists of a 127 kDa subunit (DDB-1) and a 48 kDa subunit (DDB-2) that contribute to the formation of the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein complex (UV-DDB) (1-3). In conjunction with CUL4A and ROC-1, the UV-DDB complex forms an E3 ubiquitin ligase that recognizes a broad spectrum of DNA lesions such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, 6-4 photoproducts, apurinic sites and short mismatches. The complex polyubiquitinates components of the nucleotide excision repair pathway (4-6). Loss of DDB activity has been identified in a subset of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XP-E) patients and has been linked to the deficient repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in cells derived from these patients (7-10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Secretory proteins are synthesized on polysomes and translocated into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Inside ER, these proteins are often modified by disulfide bond formation, amino-linked glycosylation and folding. The ER contains a pool of molecular chaperones, including Grp94, to help ensure correct protein folding. Grp94 is a glucose-regulated protein (1) with sequence homology to Hsp90 (2). In addition to its role in helping to facilitate folding of a number of secretory proteins to their correct conformation (3), studies suggest that Grp94 derived from cancer cells also induces anti-tumor immune responses in mouse tumor models (4, 5). One way in which Grp94 promotes tumor immunogenicity is its ability to bind to and present tumor-derived peptides as antigens (6). Furthermore, Grp94 has also been shown to induce maturation of dendritic cells (7). Taken together, Grp94 functions both as a tumor-specific antigen and as an activator of antigen-presenting cells to elicit an anti-cancer immune response (8).

$131
1 ml
Anti-biotin (D5A7) Rabbit mAb is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. This product has been optimized to detect biotinylated primary antibodies. HRP conjugated antibodies do not require incubation with a secondary antibody. *Do not mix this antibody in solution with any Anti-rabbit antibody. Anti-rabbit antibodies will cross react with this antibody and could result in decreased activity of both Anti-rabbit and Anti-biotin (D5A7) Rabbit mAb.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: Chemiluminescence systems have emerged as the best all-around method for western blot detection. They eliminate the hazards associated with radioactive materials and toxic chromogenic substrates. The speed and sensitivity of these methods are unequalled by traditional alternatives, and because results are generated on film, it is possible to record and store data permanently. Blots detected with chemiluminescent methods are easily stripped for subsequent reprobing with additional antibodies. HRP-conjugated secondary antibodies are utilized in conjunction with specific chemiluminescent substrates to generate the light signal. HRP conjugates have a very high turnover rate, yielding good sensitivity with short reaction times.

$118
10 western blots
150 µl
Nonphosphorylated c-Jun Control Cell Extracts: Total cell extracts from NIH/3T3 cells, serve as a negative control. Supplied in SDS Sample Buffer.Phosphorylated c-Jun Control Cell Extracts: Total cell extracts from NIH/3T3 cells, treated with 50 mJ UV light and a 30 minute recovery, serve as a positive control. Supplied in SDS Sample Buffer.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: c-Jun is a member of the Jun family containing c-Jun, JunB, and JunD, and is a component of the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1). AP-1 is composed of dimers of Fos, Jun, and ATF family members and binds to and activates transcription at TRE/AP-1 elements (reviewed in 1). Extracellular signals including growth factors, chemokines, and stress activate AP-1-dependent transcription. The transcriptional activity of c-Jun is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser63 and Ser73 through SAPK/JNK (reviewed in 2). Knock-out studies in mice have shown that c-Jun is essential for embryogenesis (3), and subsequent studies have demonstrated roles for c-Jun in various tissues and developmental processes including axon regeneration (4), liver regeneration (5), and T cell development (6). AP-1 regulated genes exert diverse biological functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, as well as transformation, invasion and metastasis, depending on cell type and context (7-9). Other target genes regulate survival, as well as hypoxia and angiogenesis (8,10). Research studies have implicated c-Jun as a promising therapeutic target for cancer, vascular remodeling, acute inflammation, and rheumatoid arthritis (11,12).

The Vesicle Trafficking Antibody Sampler kit provides an economical means to analyze proteins involved in the intracellular transport of cargo proteins. This kit includes enough primary and secondary antibody to perform two western blot experiments.
$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-EGF Receptor (Tyr1068) (D7A5) XP® Rabbit mAb #3777.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
CST's PathScan® Phospho-HSP27 (Ser82) Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of phospho-HSP27 (Ser82) protein. An Hsp27 Mouse mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, HSP27 protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, Phospho-HSP27 (Ser82) Rabbit Antibody is added to detect the captured phospho-HSP27 (Ser82) protein. Anti-rabbit IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of optical density for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of phospho-HSP27 (Ser82) protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Heat shock protein (HSP) 27 is one of the small HSPs that are constitutively expressed at different levels in various cell types and tissues. Like other small HSPs, HSP27 is regulated at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels (1). In response to stress, the HSP27 expression increases several-fold to confer cellular resistance to the adverse environmental change. HSP27 is phosphorylated at Ser15, Ser78, and Ser82 by MAPKAPK-2 as a result of the activation of the p38 MAP kinase pathway (2,3). Phosphorylation of HSP27 causes a change in its tertiary structure, which shifts from large homotypic multimers to dimers and monomers (4). It has been shown that phosphorylation and increased concentration of HSP27 modulates actin polymerization and reorganization (5,6).

The 14-3-3 Family Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate the expression of various 14-3-3 isoforms within the cell. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).