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Product listing: Phospho-IRAK4 (Thr345/Ser346) (D6D7) Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate), UniProt ID Q9NWZ3 #87995 to HDAC2 Antibody, UniProt ID Q92769 #2540

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-IRAK4 (Thr345/Ser346) (D6D7) Rabbit mAb #11927.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) is a serine/threonine-specific kinase that can be coprecipitated in an IL-1-inducible manner with the IL-1 receptor (1). The mammalian family of IRAK molecules contains four members (IRAK1, IRAK2, IRAK3/IRAK-M, and IRAK4). The binding of IL-1 to IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) initiates the formation of a complex that includes IL-1RI, AcP, MyD88, and IRAKs (2). IRAK undergoes autophosphorylation shortly after IL-1 stimulation. The subsequent events involve IRAK dissociation from the IL-1RI complex, its ubiquitination, and its association with two membrane-bound proteins: TAB2 and TRAF6. The resulting IRAK-TRAF6-TAB2 complex is then released into the cytoplasm where it activates protein kinase cascades, including TAK1, IKKs, and the stress-activated kinases (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein Rb regulates cell proliferation by controlling progression through the restriction point within the G1-phase of the cell cycle (1). Rb has three functionally distinct binding domains and interacts with critical regulatory proteins including the E2F family of transcription factors, c-Abl tyrosine kinase, and proteins with a conserved LXCXE motif (2-4). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation by a CDK inhibits Rb target binding and allows cell cycle progression (5). Rb inactivation and subsequent cell cycle progression likely requires an initial phosphorylation by cyclin D-CDK4/6 followed by cyclin E-CDK2 phosphorylation (6). Specificity of different CDK/cyclin complexes has been observed in vitro (6-8) and cyclin D1 is required for Ser780 phosphorylation in vivo (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: At least four distinct polo-like kinases exist in mammalian cells: PLK1, PLK2, PLK3, and PLK4/SAK (1). PLK1 apparently plays many roles during mitosis, particularly in regulating mitotic entry and exit. The mitosis promoting factor (MPF), cdc2/cyclin B1, is activated by dephosphorylation of cdc2 (Thr14/Tyr15) by cdc25C. PLK1 phosphorylates cdc25C at Ser198 and cyclin B1 at Ser133 causing translocation of these proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus (2-5). PLK1 phosphorylation of Myt1 at Ser426 and Thr495 has been proposed to inactivate Myt1, one of the kinases known to phosphorylate cdc2 at Thr14/Tyr15 (6). Polo-like kinases also phosphorylate the cohesin subunit SCC1, causing cohesin displacement from chromosome arms that allow for proper cohesin localization to centromeres (7). Mitotic exit requires activation of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) (8), a ubiquitin ligase responsible for removal of cohesin at centromeres, and degradation of securin, cyclin A, cyclin B1, Aurora A, and cdc20 (9). PLK1 phosphorylation of the APC subunits Apc1, cdc16, and cdc27 has been demonstrated in vitro and has been proposed as a mechanism by which mitotic exit is regulated (10,11).Substitution of Thr210 with Asp has been reported to elevate PLK1 kinase activity and delay/arrest cells in mitosis, while a Ser137Asp substitution leads to S-phase arrest (12). In addition, while DNA damage has been found to inhibit PLK1 kinase activity, the Thr210Asp mutant is resistant to this inhibition (13). PLK1 has been reported to be phosphorylated in vivo at Ser137 and Thr210 in mitosis; DNA damage prevents phosphorylation at these sites (14).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Forkhead family of transcription factors is involved in tumorigenesis of rhabdomyosarcoma and acute leukemias (1-3). Within the family, three members (FoxO1, FoxO4, and FoxO3a) have sequence similarity to the nematode orthologue DAF-16, which mediates signaling via a pathway involving IGFR1, PI3K, and Akt (4-6). Active forkhead members act as tumor suppressors by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Increased expression of any FoxO member results in the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p27 Kip1. Forkhead transcription factors also play a part in TGF-β-mediated upregulation of p21 Cip1, a process negatively regulated through PI3K (7). Increased proliferation results when forkhead transcription factors are inactivated through phosphorylation by Akt at Thr24, Ser256, and Ser319, which results in nuclear export and inhibition of transcription factor activity (8). Forkhead transcription factors can also be inhibited by the deacetylase sirtuin (SirT1) (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Connexin 43 (Cx43) is a member of the large family of gap junction proteins. Connexins assemble as a hexamer and are transported to the plasma membrane to create a hemichannel that can associate with hemichannels on nearby cells to create cell-to-cell channels. Clusters of these channels assemble to make gap junctions. Gap junction communication is important in development and regulation of cell growth. Phosphorylation of Cx43 is important in regulating assembly and function of gap junctions (1,2). Ser368 of Cx43 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) after activation by phorbol esters, which decreases cell-to-cell communication (3). Src can interact with and phosphorylate Cx43 to alter gap junction communication (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination requires the concerted action of the E1, E2, and E3 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. Ubiquitin is first activated through ATP-dependent formation of a thiol ester with ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. The activated ubiquitin is then transferred to a thiol group of ubiquitin-carrier enzyme E2. The final step is the transfer of ubiquitin from E2 to an ε-amino group of the target protein lysine residue, which is mediated by ubiquitin-ligase enzyme E3 (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) is one of the major substrates of the insulin receptor kinase (1). IRS-1 contains multiple tyrosine phosphorylation motifs that serve as docking sites for SH2-domain containing proteins that mediate the metabolic and growth-promoting functions of insulin (2-4). IRS-1 also contains over 30 potential serine/threonine phosphorylation sites. Ser307 of IRS-1 is phosphorylated by JNK (5) and IKK (6) while Ser789 is phosphorylated by SIK-2, a member of the AMPK family (7). The PKC and mTOR pathways mediate phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser612 and Ser636/639, respectively (8,9). Phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser1101 is mediated by PKCθ and results in an inhibition of insulin signaling in the cell, suggesting a potential mechanism for insulin resistance in some models of obesity (10).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The methylation of deoxyuridine monophosphate (dUMP) to deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP) is an essential step in the formation of thymine nucleotides (1,2, reviewed in 3). This process is catalyzed by thymidylate synthase (TS or TYMS), a homodimer composed of two 30 kDa subunits. TS is an intracellular enzyme that provides the sole de novo source of thymidylate, making it a required enzyme in DNA biosynthesis with activity highest in proliferating cells (1). Being the exclusive source of dTMP, investigators have concluded that TS is also an important target for anticancer agents such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (1-5). 5-FU acts as a TS inhibitor and is active against solid tumors such as colon, breast, head, and neck. Research studies have demonstrated that patients with metastases expressing lower levels of TS have a higher response rate to treatment with 5-FU than patients with tumors that have increased levels of TS (5). Researchers continue to investigate TS expression in different types of cancers (6-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DPP4 (CD26) is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein expressed ubiquitously in most tissues and different cell types (1,2). The protein has a short cytoplasmic domain, transmembrane domain, a flexible stalk fragment and extracellular fragment (2). Both the catalytic peptide hydrolase domain and the beta-propeller ligand binding domain are located in the extracellular fragment (2). DPP4 is a multifunctional protein that exists in both a membrane bound form as well as an extracellular soluble form. As a peptidase, it removes N-terminal dipeptides sequentially from proteins with a proline or alanine as the penultimate P1 amino acid (3.4). DPP4 has been shown to cleave a wide range of substrates including GLP-1, BNP, substance P, etc. It is also involved in the regulation of related biological functions (5). In addition to it peptidase activity, DPP4 interacts with multiple important cell surface ligands, such as adenosine deaminase, fibronectin, and IGF2 receptor to influence processes like T cell activation, cell migration and proliferation (5). Several DPP4 inhibitors have been developed and their effects have been tested in the field of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and tumor immunity (2,5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Troponin, working in conjunction with tropomyosin, functions as a molecular switch that regulates muscle contraction in response to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Troponin consists of three subunits: the Ca2+-binding subunit troponin C (TnC), the tropomyosin-binding subunit troponin T (TnT), and the inhibitory subunit troponin I (TnI) (1). In response to β-adrenergic stimulation of the heart, Ser23 and Ser24 of TnI (cardiac) are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. This phosphorylation stimulates a conformational change of the regulatory domain of TnC, reduces the association between TnI and TnC, and decreases myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by reducing the Ca2+ binding affinity of TnC (1-3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Erg-associated protein with SET domain (ESET), also known as SET-domain, bifurcated 1 (SETDB1) protein, is a member of a family of histone lysine methyltransferases, each of which contains a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in Drosophila Su[var]3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins (1). ESET also contains tudor and methyl-CpG-binding domains, which may coordinate binding to methylated histones and methylated DNA, respectively (1). ESET methylates histone H3 Lys9, creating a transcriptionally repressive mark that facilitates gene silencing (1-3). However, unlike SUV39H histone H3 Lys9 methyltransferases, which function mainly in heterochromatin regions such as pericentric heterochromatin, ESET functions mainly in euchromatic regions to repress gene promoters (3). ESET interacts with a variety of proteins, including transcription factors (ERG), histone deacetylases (HDAC1/2), DNA methyltransferases (DNMT3A/B) and transcriptional co-repressors (mSin3A/B, MBD1, KAP-1, the ATFa-associated modulator mAM) (1-6). mAM forms a complex with ESET, stimulating its methyltransferase activity, specifically the conversion of di-methyl to tri-methyl histone H3 Lys9 (2). MBD1 recruits ESET to the CAF-1 complex to facilitate methylation of histone H3 Lys9 during replication-coupled chromatin assembly in S phase (5). DNMT3A recruits ESET to silenced promoters in cancer cells (7). ESET may play a role in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease, since levels of ESET protein and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys9 are both increased in diseased brains (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) comprise a family of transcription factors that function within the Jak/Stat pathway to regulate interferon (IFN) and IFN-inducible gene expression in response to viral infection (1). IRFs play an important role in pathogen defense, autoimmunity, lymphocyte development, cell growth, and susceptibility to transformation. The IRF family includes nine members: IRF-1, IRF-2, IRF-9/ISGF3γ, IRF-3, IRF-4 (Pip/LSIRF/ICSAT), IRF-5, IRF-6, IRF-7, and IRF-8/ICSBP. All IRF proteins share homology in their amino-terminal DNA-binding domains. IRF family members regulate transcription through interactions with proteins that share similar DNA-binding motifs, such as IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE), IFN consensus sequences (ICS), and IFN regulatory elements (IRF-E) (2).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Axl (C89E7) Rabbit mAb #8661.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Axl, Sky, and Mer are three members of a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family that share a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain and an extracellular domain similar to those seen in cell adhesion molecules. These RTKs bind the vitamin K-dependent protein growth-arrest-specific 6 (Gas6), which is structurally related to the protein S anticoagulation factor (1). Upon binding to its receptor, Gas6 activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream targets Akt and S6K, as well as NF-κB (2,3). A large body of evidence supports a role for Gas6/Axl signaling in cell growth and survival in normal and cancer cells (4).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA, also known as FOLH1), a type II transmembrane protein of the M28 family, has both folate hydrolase and N-acetylated-alpha-linked acidic dipeptidase activity. PSMA was originally identified in the LNCaP cell line, which was derived from a prostate adenocarcinoma lymph node metastasis (1,2). PSMA is an established prostate cancer marker (3); however, it is expressed in other tissues, including kidney, liver, and urinary bladder (4), and it is associated with tumor neovasculature (5) as well. Research studies suggest that PSMA is both a potential diagnostic readout and therapeutic target (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The transcription regulator BTB and CNC homolog 2 (BACH2) is a bZIP domain-containing transcriptional repressor that dimerizes with MafK and binds Maf recognition elements (MAREs) to regulate transcription (1,2). BACH2 is part of a network of transcription factors that controls the transition of activated B cells into either antibody-producing plasma cells or memory B cells (3-5). Plasma cell differentiation requires the transcription factor Blimp1 (6). BACH2 suppresses expression of Blimp1 in activated B cells, which delays plasma cell differentiation and allows time for class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation (3-5). Genome-wide association studies have linked the genetic locus containing BACH2 to several immune-related disorders including type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, Crohn’s disease, and the skin condition known as vitiligo (7-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rab35 belongs to the small GTPase superfamily. By interacting with its specific GEF or GAP, Rab35 regulates cargo-specific endocytosis at the vesicle recycling step or mediates exocytosis at the exosome docking/tethering step (1-4). During cytokinesis, Rab35 interacts with OCRL phosphatase and is essential for maintaining intercellular bridge stability and abscission by controlling the concentration of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and SEPT2 localization at the intercellular bridge (5,6). Rab35 also plays a role in actin assembly and the recruitment of Cdc42 and Rac1 to the site of filopodium by its direct interaction with actin-bundling protein fascin and actin-binding protein connecdenn 3 (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Bcr gene was orginally identified by its presence in the chimeric Bcr-Abl oncogene (1). The amino-terminal region of Bcr contains an oligomerization domain, a serine/threonine kinase domain, and a region that binds SH2 domains. The middle of the protein has a PH domain and a region of sequence similarity to the guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Rho family of GTP binding proteins. The carboxy-terminal region may be involved in a GTPase activating function for the small GTP-binding protein Rac (2,3). The function of wild type Bcr in cells remains unclear. PDGF receptor may use Bcr as a downstream signaling mediator (4). Research studies have shown that the Bcr-Abl fusion results in production of a constitutively active tyrosine kinase, which causes chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) (5). Tyr177 of Bcr is phosphorylated in the Bcr-Abl fusion protein, which plays an important role in transforming the activity of Bcr-Abl (6). Phosphorylated Tyr177 provides a docking site for Gab2 and GRB2 (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Neurogenin 2 (Ngn2, NeuroG2) is a proneural, basic helix-loop-helix transcription (bHLH) factor and member of the neurogenin family that includes neurogenin 1 and neurogenin 3 (1). Neurogenin 2 is expressed in neuronal progenitor cells, is required for generation of glutamatergic neurons and is commonly used as a marker of neuronal differentiation (2,3). Neurogenin 2 upregulates a number of targets including the bHLH transcription factor NeuroD (4). Phosphorylation of Ngn2 at Tyr241 controls migration and dendritic morphology of cortical neurons (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The nuclear factor-like 2 (NRF2) transcriptional activator binds antioxidant response elements (ARE) of target gene promoter regions to regulate expression of oxidative stress response genes. Under basal conditions, the NRF2 inhibitor INrf2 (also called KEAP1) binds and retains NRF2 in the cytoplasm where it can be targeted for ubiquitin-mediated degradation (1). Small amounts of constitutive nuclear NRF2 maintain cellular homeostasis through regulation of basal expression of antioxidant response genes. Following oxidative or electrophilic stress, KEAP1 releases NRF2, thereby allowing the activator to translocate to the nucleus and bind to ARE-containing genes (2). The coordinated action of NRF2 and other transcription factors mediates the response to oxidative stress (3). Altered expression of NRF2 is associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (4). NRF2 activity in lung cancer cell lines directly correlates with cell proliferation rates, and inhibition of NRF2 expression by siRNA enhances anti-cancer drug-induced apoptosis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces. Tight junctions are composed of claudin and occludin proteins, which join the junctions to the cytoskeleton (1,2). The claudin family is composed of 23 integral membrane proteins, and their expression, which varies among tissue types, may determine both the strength and properties of the epithelial barrier. Alteration in claudin protein expression pattern is associated with several types of cancer (2,3). Claudin-1 is expressed primarily in keratinocytes (4) and normal mammary epithelial cells, but is absent or reduced in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The centrosome is composed of a pair of centrioles surrounded by electron-dense pericentriolar material and functions as the microtubule-organizing center responsible for microtubule nucleation and spindle organization during cell cycle progression (1). Percentriolar material 1 (PCM-1) is a large, 228 kDa protein associated with the centrosome in a cell cycle dependent manner (2). PCM-1 localizes to small cytoplasmic granules called centrosomal satellites (3). PCM-1 is required for the assembly of several centrosomal proteins including centrin, pericentrin, ninein, NEK2, and CEP250 (4-8). Chromosomal translocations involving genes encoding PCM-1 and the tyrosine kinases Ret and Jak2 are associated with some cancers, including papillary thyroid carcinoma and myeloid leukemia (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DOT1-like protein (DOT1L), also known as Lysine N-methyltransferase 4 (KMT4), is a histone methyltransferase that functions to mono-, di-, and tri-methylate histone H3 on lysine 79, a histone modification that is associated with active transcription and plays a role in DNA damage response, cell cycle regulation, and embryonic stem cell development (1). DOT1L is required for the initiation and maintenance of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged leukemias, and selective DOT1L inhibitors such as EP2-5676 show remarkable anti-tumor effects in MLL-rearranged leukemias (2,3). Multiple studies have also implicated DOT1L in solid tumor cancers such as breast cancer, where DOT1L induces neoplastic transformation of immortalized breast cancer cells and promotes tumor initiation and growth. Overexpression of DOT1L is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer, and selective DOT1L inhibitors are able to suppress proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces. Tight junctions are composed of claudin and occludin proteins, which join the junctions to the cytoskeleton (1,2). The claudin family is composed of 23 integral membrane proteins, and their expression, which varies among tissue types, may determine both the strength and properties of the epithelial barrier. Alteration in claudin protein expression pattern is associated with several types of cancer (2,3). Claudin-1 is expressed primarily in keratinocytes (4) and normal mammary epithelial cells, but is absent or reduced in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is a family of heterochromatic adaptor molecules involved in both gene silencing and higher order chromatin structure (1). All three HP1 family members (α, β, and γ) are primarily associated with centromeric heterochromatin; however, HP1β and γ also localize to euchromatic sites in the genome (2,3). HP1 proteins are approximately 25 kDa in size and contain a conserved amino-terminal chromodomain, followed by a variable hinge region and a conserved carboxy-terminal chromoshadow domain. The chromodomain facilitates binding to histone H3 tri-methylated at Lys9, a histone "mark" closely associated with centromeric heterochromatin (4,5). The variable hinge region binds both RNA and DNA in a sequence-independent manner (6). The chromoshadow domain mediates the dimerization of HP1 proteins, in addition to binding multiple proteins implicated in gene silencing and heterochromatin formation, including the SUV39H histone methyltransferase, the DNMT1 and DNMT3a DNA methyltransferases, and the p150 subunit of chromatin-assembly factor-1 (CAF1) (7-9). In addition to contributing to heterochromatin formation and propagation, HP1 and SUV39H are also found complexed with retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F6 proteins, both of which function to repress euchromatic gene transcription in quiescent cells (10,11). HP1 proteins are subject to multiple types of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, suggesting multiple means of regulation (12-14).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF, CSF-1) receptor is an integral membrane tyrosine kinase encoded by the c-fms proto-oncogene. M-CSF receptor is expressed in monocytes (macrophages and their progenitors) and drives growth and development of this blood cell lineage. (1-3). Binding of M-CSF to its receptor induces receptor dimerization, activation, and autophosphorylation of cytoplasmic tyrosine residues used as docking sites for SH2-containing signaling proteins (4). There are at least five major tyrosine autophosphorylation sites. Tyr723 (Tyr721 in mouse) is located in the kinase insert (KI) region. Phosphorylated Tyr723 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase as well as PLCγ2 (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr809 provides a docking site for Shc (5). Overactivation of this receptor can lead to a malignant phenotype in various cell systems (6). The activated M-CSF receptor has been shown to be a predictor of poor outcome in advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma (7) and breast cancer (8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Xenopus

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box (Fox) proteins are a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors containing a sequence known as Forkhead box or winged helix DNA binding domain (1). The human genome contains 43 Fox proteins that are divided into subfamilies. The FoxP subfamily has four members, FoxP1 - FoxP4, which are broadly expressed and play important roles in organ development, immune response and cancer pathogenesis (2-4). The FoxP subfamily has several characteristics that are atypical among Fox proteins: their Forkhead domain is located at the carboxy-terminal region and they contain motifs that promote homo- and heterodimerization. FoxP proteins usually function as transcriptional repressors (4,5).FoxP3 is crucial for the development of T cells with regulatory properties (Treg) (6). Mutations in FoxP3 are associated with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, and X-linked syndrome (IPEX) (7), while overexpression in mice causes severe immunodeficiency (8). Research studies have shown that FoxP3 functions as a tumor suppressor in several types of cancer (9-11).

$115
20 µl
$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: CD74, which is also known as the MHC Class II-associated invariant chain (Ii), is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein that plays a critical role in the antigen presentation process as a chaperone of MHC Class II proteins. It is expressed at high levels on B cells and to a lesser extent on numerous antigen presenting cell (APC) types including dendritic cells, Langerhans cells, monocytes, and macrophages as well as non-traditional APCs such as epithelial cells (1,2). CD74 was initially identified for its ability to regulate the folding and intracellular trafficking of newly synthesized MHC Class II molecules. Following expression, CD74 self-assembles as a trimer that serves as a scaffold for the assembly of MHC Class II molecules. Through this interaction, CD74 blocks the peptide binding cleft of MHC Class II molecules and prevents their premature association with endogenous polypeptides (3). Binding to CD74 also facilitates the translocation of MHC Class II molecules from the endoplasmic reticulum to the endocytic compartments during antigen presentation (4). In addition to its role as an MHC Class II chaperone, CD74 is also the receptor for macrophage migration-inhibitory factor (MIF). Binding to CD74 and its co-receptor, CD44, has been shown to induce the activation of the NFkB and ERK pathways to promote cell proliferation and survival signals (5,6). Recent studies have identified CXCR2 and CXCR4 as co-receptors for CD74 where MIF binding to CD74 complexes contributes to MIF-mediated monocyte chemotaxis and the induction of Akt signaling, respectively (7,8). Increased CD74 surface expression has been reported under inflammatory conditions and in certain types of cancer cells implying a potential role in tumorigenesis (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).