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Product listing: ACO2 (D6D9) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q99798 #6571 to Acetyl-Histone H3 (Lys9) (C5B11) Rabbit mAb (Pacific Blue™ Conjugate), UniProt ID P68431 #11857

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Aconitase 2 (ACO2) catalyzes the conversion of citrate to isocitrate via cis-aconitate in the second step of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (1,2). ACO2 is also an important regulator of iron homeostasis within cells (1-4). In addition, research studies have shown that this enzyme is deficient in the mitochondrial disease Friedreich's Ataxia (4,5).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
CST's PathScan® Phospho-Insulin Receptor β (Tyr1146) Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects transfected phospho-insulin receptor (Tyr1146) protein. A Phospho-Insulin Receptor (Tyr1146) Antibody has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, phospho-insulin receptor (Tyr1146) proteins are captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, Insulin Receptor β Mouse mAb is added to detect the captured phospho-insulin receptor (Tyr1146) protein. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of optical density for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of phospho-insulin receptor (Tyr1146) protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that is widely expressed in many cell lines and cell types within fetal and postnatal tissues (1-3). Receptor autophosphorylation follows binding of the IGF-I and IGF-II ligands. Three tyrosine residues within the kinase domain (Tyr1131, Tyr1135, and Tyr1136) are the earliest major autophosphorylation sites (4). Phosphorylation of these three tyrosine residues is necessary for kinase activation (5,6). Insulin receptors (IRs) share significant structural and functional similarity with IGF-I receptors, including the presence of an equivalent tyrosine cluster (Tyr1146/1150/1151) within the kinase domain activation loop. Tyrosine autophosphorylation of IRs is one of the earliest cellular responses to insulin stimulation (7). Autophosphorylation begins with phosphorylation at Tyr1146 and either Tyr1150 or Tyr1151, while full kinase activation requires triple tyrosine phosphorylation (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D (PLD) hydrolyzes phosphatidylcholine (PC) to produce choline and phosphatidic acid (PA). PA is the precursor of the second messenger, diacylglycerol (DAG). Two isoforms of PLD (PLD1 and PLD2) have been identified so far. Both are regulated by protein kinases, small GTPases and Ca2+ (1). PLD1 is phosphorylated at Ser2, Ser561, and Thr147 by PKC (2,3). Phosphorylation at Thr147 and Ser561 regulates PLD1 activity (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MOB1 was first identified in yeast as a protein that binds to Mps with essential roles in the completion of mitosis and the maintenance of ploidy (1). Its Drosophila and mammalian homologs, Mats and MOB1, respectively, are involved in the Hippo signaling tumor suppressor pathway, which plays a critical role in organ size regulation and which has been implicated in cancer development (2-5). There are two MOB1 proteins in humans, MOB1α and MOB1β, that are encoded by two different genes but which have greater than 95% amino acid sequence identity (6). Both forms bind to members of the nuclear Dbf2-related (NDR) kinases, such as LATS1/2 and NDR1/2, thereby stimulating kinase activity (7-9). This binding is promoted by the phosphorylation of MOB1 at several threonine residues by MST1 and/or MST2 (5,10).

The Initiator Caspases Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of evaluating initiator (apical) caspase proteins. The kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots with each primary antibody.
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) forms a heterodimer of at least one NR1 and one NR2A-D subunit. Multiple receptor isoforms with distinct brain distributions and functional properties arise by selective splicing of the NR1 transcripts and differential expression of the NR2 subunits. NR1 subunits bind the co-agonist glycine and NR2 subunits bind the neurotransmitter glutamate. Activation of the NMDA receptor or opening of the ion channel allows flow of Na+ and Ca2+ ions into the cell, and K+ out of the cell (1). Each subunit has a cytoplasmic domain that can be directly modified by the protein kinase/phosphatase (2). PKC can phosphorylate the NR1 subunit (NMDAR1) of the receptor at Ser890/Ser896, and PKA can phosphorylate NR1 at Ser897 (3). The phosphorylation of NR1 by PKC decreases its affinity for calmodulin, thus preventing the inhibitory effect of calmodulin on NMDAR (4). The phosphorylation of NR1 by PKA probably counteracts the inhibitory effect of calcineurin on the receptor (5). NMDAR mediates long-term potentiation and slow postsynaptic excitation, which play central roles in learning, neurodevelopment, and neuroplasticity (6).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated GATA-1 (D52H6) XP® Rabbit mAb #3535.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: GATA proteins comprise a group of transcription factors that are related by the presence of conserved zinc finger DNA binding domains, which bind directly to the nucleotide sequence core element GATA (1-3). There are six vertebrate GATA proteins, designated GATA-1 to GATA-6 (3).

$115
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology normal mouse IgG (whole molecule) containing predominantly IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes and small amounts of IgG2b and IgG3 is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. Mouse IgG (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) is useful to determine non-specific immunoprecipitation complexes.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: Control antibodies are used to estimate the non-specific binding of target primary antibodies due to Fc receptor binding or other protein-protein interactions.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Total IRS-1 Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of IRS-1. An IRS-1 Rabbit Antibody has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, IRS-1 (phospho and nonphospho) is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, IRS-1 Mouse Detection Antibody is added to detect the captured IRS-1 protein. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibody #7076 is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of total IRS-1.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Background: Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) is one of the major substrates of the insulin receptor kinase (1). IRS-1 contains multiple tyrosine phosphorylation motifs that serve as docking sites for SH2-domain containing proteins that mediate the metabolic and growth-promoting functions of insulin (2-4). IRS-1 also contains over 30 potential serine/threonine phosphorylation sites. Ser307 of IRS-1 is phosphorylated by JNK (5) and IKK (6) while Ser789 is phosphorylated by SIK-2, a member of the AMPK family (7). The PKC and mTOR pathways mediate phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser612 and Ser636/639, respectively (8,9). Phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser1101 is mediated by PKCθ and results in an inhibition of insulin signaling in the cell, suggesting a potential mechanism for insulin resistance in some models of obesity (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: BCAT1 and BCAT2 are cytosolic and mitochondrial branched chain aminotransferases, respectively (1,2). Research studies have implicated BCAT1 in distant metastasis in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (3). Disruption of BCAT2 in mice leads to higher levels of plasma branched-chain amino acids, reduced adiposity and body weight, and increased energy expenditure, suggesting its role in regulating insulin sensitivity (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RalA and RalB are members of the Ras family of small GTPases and are highly homologous in protein sequence. The functions of RalA and RalB are distinct yet overlapping. By binding to various effector proteins, RalA and RalB serve as important GTP sensors for exocytosis and membrane trafficking (1-3). RalA is required for Ras-related tumorigenesis (4) and RalB is important for tumor survival (5). In addition to tumor formation, Ral proteins also play a role in cancer cell migration and metastatic tumor invasion (6,7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Notch signaling is activated upon engagement of the Notch receptor with its ligands, the DSL (Delta, Serrate, Lag2) proteins of single-pass type I membrane proteins. The DSL proteins contain multiple EGF-like repeats and a DSL domain that is required for binding to Notch (1,2). Five DSL proteins have been identified in mammals: Jagged1, Jagged2, Delta-like (DLL) 1, 3 and 4 (3). Ligand binding to the Notch receptor results in two sequential proteolytic cleavages of the receptor by the ADAM protease and the γ-secretase complex. The intracellular domain of Notch is released and then translocates to the nucleus where it activates transcription. Notch ligands may also be processed in a way similar to Notch, suggesting a bi-directional signaling through receptor-ligand interactions (4-6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) was initially identified as an enzyme that regulates glycogen synthesis in response to insulin (1). GSK-3 is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates and inactivates glycogen synthase. GSK-3 is a critical downstream element of the PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway whose activity can be inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation at Ser21 of GSK-3α and Ser9 of GSK-3β (2,3). GSK-3 has been implicated in the regulation of cell fate in Dictyostelium and is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway required for Drosophila, Xenopus, and mammalian development (4). GSK-3 has been shown to regulate cyclin D1 proteolysis and subcellular localization (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: FKBP4 (also known as FKBP52) is a member of the immunophilin protein family. FKBP4 does not demonstrate appreciable immunosuppressant activity typical of this family, despite its ability to bind the immunosuppressants FK506 and rapamycin (1,2). While FKBP4 plays an important role in immunoregulatory gene expression in B and T lymphocytes, its role in regulating steroid hormone receptor signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics is garnering significant interest. FKBP4 contains two petidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) domains, the first of which is implicated in steroid receptor signaling while the second interacts with tubulin and other cytoskeletal components. The maturation of cytoplasmic steroid hormone receptors into a functional conformation requires multiple chaperone and co-chaperone components, including HSP90, p23, and FKBP4 (3,4). FKBP4 interacts with HSP90 to facilitate the folding of androgen, glucocorticoid, and progesterone steroid hormone receptors. Indeed, the functionality of these receptors is impaired in the absence of FKBP4, and research studies have found that null mice demonstrate signs of androgen insensitivity syndrome (5). In addition, FKBP4, which is expressed at high levels in the brain, interacts with hyperphosphorylated Tau and antagonizes Tau's ability to promote microtubule polymerization (6). FKBP4 can also suppress amyloid β toxicity in Drosophila by processing APP (Alzheimer's Amyloid Precursor Protein) to unfold aggregates (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Optineurin is a signaling protein involved in maintenance of the Golgi complex, membrane trafficking, NF-κB, and interferon signaling. Mutations in the gene encoding optineurin have been associated with human diseases including glaucoma, Paget disease of bone, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (1-2). Optineurin is thought to contribute to these pathologies through regulation of inflammatory signaling, autophagy, and mitophagy (1, 3). The NF-κB-activating kinase/TANK-binding kinase 1 (NAK/TBK1) phosphorylates optineurin at serine 177, regulating optineurin’s role in autophagy and mitophagy (4-6). The tumor suppressor HACE1 ubiquitylates optineurin, promoting the interaction of optineurin with the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Thymidine kinases play a critical role in generating the DNA synthetic precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) by catalyzing the phosphotransfer of phosphate from ATP to deoxythymidine (dT) and thymidine (T) in the cell. There are two known thymidine kinases, cytoplasmic thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) and mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) (1,2). Unlike TK2, which is not modulated by the cell cycle, TK1 expression and activity is regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, accumulating during G1-phase to peak levels in S-phase before being degraded prior to cell division (3,4). Stability, but not activity, may be regulated via phosphorylation of TK1 at Ser13 by Cdc2 and/or Cdk2, but the precise mode of regulation remains elusive (5). These observations indicate that TK1 might be a useful marker of cell proliferation; however, recent studies have shown that TK1 plays a more significant role in the DNA damage response (6). Genotoxic stress promotes increased TK1 expression and kinase activity resulting in reduced cellular apoptosis and enhanced DNA repair efficiency (6). More importantly, numerous studies show that TK1 expression and activity are upregulated during neoplasia and disease progression in humans, and increased serum levels of TK1 correlate with poor prognosis and decreased survival in patients with various types of advanced tumors (7-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: SSEA-1 antibody detects a lactoseries oligosaccharide antigen that is expressed on the surface of mouse embryonal carcinoma and embryonic stem cells (1). This antigen is also found on early mouse embryos and both mouse and human germ cells, but is absent on human embryonic stem cells and human embryonic carcinoma cells. Expression of SSEA1 in these human cell types increases upon differentiation, while on the mouse cell types differentiation leads to decreased expression (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MAP kinases are inactivated by dual-specificity protein phosphatases (DUSPs) that differ in their substrate specificity, tissue distribution, inducibility by extracellular stimuli, and cellular localization. DUSPs, also known as MAPK phosphatases (MKP), specifically dephosphorylate both threonine and tyrosine residues in MAPK P-loops and have been shown to play important roles in regulating the function of the MAPK family (1,2). At least 13 members of the family (DUSP1-10, DUSP14, DUSP16, and DUSP22) display unique substrate specificities for various MAP kinases (3). MAPK phosphatases typically contain an amino-terminal rhodanese-fold responsible for DUSP docking to MAPK family members and a carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (4). These phosphatases can play important roles in development, immune system function, stress responses, and metabolic homeostasis (5). In addition, research studies have implicated DUSPs in the development of cancer and the response of cancer cells to chemotherapy (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HSP40 and HSP40-like proteins represent a large family of chaperone proteins that are homologous to E. coli DnaJ protein (1). These proteins are classified into three subtypes based on their structures. The common feature of the family is a conserved J domain, which is usually located at the amino terminus of proteins and responsible for their association with HSP70 (1,2). Human HSP40, also known as Hdj1, belongs to subtype II that contain a unique Gly/Phe-rich region (2). HSP40 family proteins bind unfolded proteins, prevent their aggregation, and then deliver them to HSP70 (2,3). Another major function of HSP40 is to stimulate ATPase activity of HSP70, which causes conformational change of the unfolded proteins (4,5). The HSP40-HSP70-unfolded protein complex further binds to co-chaperones Hip, Hop and HSP90 or components of the protein degradation machinery such as CHIP and BAG-1, which either leads to protein folding or degradation, respectively (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CrkII, a cellular homologue of v-Crk, belongs to a family of adaptor proteins with an SH2-SH3-SH3 domain structure that transmits signals from tyrosine kinases (1). The primary function of Crk is to recruit cytoplasmic proteins in the vicinity of tyrosine kinases through SH2-phospho-tyrosine interaction. Thus, the output from Crk depends on the SH3-binding proteins, which include the C3G and Sos guanine nucleotide exchange proteins, Abl tyrosine kinase, DOCK180 and some STE20-related kinases. The variety of Crk-binding proteins indicates the pleiotropic function of Crk (2). The two CrkII SH3 domains are separated by a 54 amino acid linker region, which is highly conserved in Xenopus, chicken and mammalian CrkII proteins (3). Tyrosine 221 in this region is phosphorylated by the Abl tyrosine kinase (4), IGF-I receptor (5) and EGF receptor (6). Once Tyr221 is phosphorylated, CrkII undergoes a change in intramolecular folding and SH2-pTyr interaction, which causes rapid dissociation of CrkII from the tyrosine kinase complex (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MYST2, also known as HBO1 and lysine acetyltransferase 7 (KAT7), is a member of the MYST (MOZ, YBF2, SAS2 and Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs). MYST2 is the catalytic subunit of the HBO1 acetyltransferase complex, which consists of MYST2, MYST/ESA1-asociated factor 6 (MEAF6), inhibitor of growth protein 4 (ING4) or inhibitor of growth protein 5 (ING5), and one of two families of scaffold proteins (JADE-1/2/3 or BRPF1/2/3) (1,2). The substrate specificity of the HBO1 complex is determined by the associated scaffold protein. HBO1 complexes containing JADE scaffold proteins acetylate histone H4 on lysines 5, 8 and 12, while complexes containing BRPF scaffold proteins acetylate histone H3 on lysines 14 and 23 (2). In addition the scaffold protein appears to regulate the function of the HBO1 complex. Complexes containing JADE scaffold proteins bind to origin recognition complex 1 (ORC1) and regulate licensing of DNA replication, while HBO1 complexes containing BRPF scaffold proteins regulate transcription (2-5). MYST2 is required for regulation of cell proliferation (1), adipogenesis (6), embryonic development (7) and survival of fetal liver erythroblasts (8). In addition, MYST2 is over-expressed in several human cancers, including cancers of the testis, ovary, breast, stomach, esophagus, and bladder (9). The MYST2 gene is amplified and protein is over-expressed in breast cancers, and over-expression of MYST2 increases anchorage-independent growth of several breast cancer cell lines (10).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Grb-associated binder (Gab) family is a family of adaptor proteins recruited by a wide variety of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such as EGFR, HGFR, insulin receptor, cytokine receptor and B cell antigen receptors. Upon stimulation of RTKs by their cognate ligand, Gab is recruited to the plasma membrane where it is phosphorylated and functions as a scaffold (1-4). Multiple tyrosine phosphorylation sites of Gab1 protein have been identified (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr472 regulates its binding to p85 PI3 kinase (6,7). Phosphorylation of Gab1 at Tyr307, Tyr373 and Tyr407 modulates its association to PLCγ (8). Phosphorylation of Tyr627 and Tyr659 is required for Gab1 binding to and activation of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (6,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The proprotein convertases (PCs) are enzymes that activate precursor proteins through proteolytic cleavage within the secretory pathway. PCs comprise several enzymes that are basic amino acid-specific proteinases (furin, PC1/3, PC2, PC4, PACE4, PC5/6, and PC7), as well as nonbasic amino acid convertases (S1P and PC9) (1). PCs have a common structure that includes an N-terminal signal peptide for secretory pathway targeting; a pro-domain that is thought to act as an intramolecular chaperone; a catalytic domain containing the active site; a P-domain that contributes to the overall folding of the enzyme by regulating stability, calcium-, and pH-dependence; and a C-terminal domain that interacts with the membrane (2). PCs act in a tissue- and substrate-specific fashion to generate an array of bioactive peptides and proteins from precursors, both in the brain and the periphery (3).

PTMScan® Technology employs a proprietary methodology from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) for peptide enrichment by immunoprecipitation using a specific bead-conjugated antibody in conjunction with liquid chromatography (LC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for quantitative profiling of post-translational modification (PTM) sites in cellular proteins. These include phosphorylation (PhosphoScan®), ubiquitination (UbiScan®), acetylation (AcetylScan®), and methylation (MethylScan®), among others. PTMScan® Technology enables researchers to isolate, identify, and quantitate large numbers of post-translationally modified cellular peptides with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, providing a global overview of PTMs in cell and tissue samples without preconceived biases about where these modified sites occur. For more information on PTMScan® Proteomics Services, please visit https://www.cellsignal.com/services/index.html.
$489
96 assays
1 Kit
CST's PathScan® Total TrkA Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects transfected levels of total TrkA protein. A TrkA Mouse mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, both phospho- and nonphospho-TrkA proteins are captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a TrkA Rabbit Antibody is added to detect both the captured phospho- and nonphospho-TrkA protein. Anti-rabbit IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of optical density for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of total TrkA protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The family of Trk receptor tyrosine kinases consists of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC. While the sequence of these family members is highly conserved, they are activated by different neurotrophins: TrkA by NGF, TrkB by BDNF or NT4, and TrkC by NT3 (1). Neurotrophin signaling through these receptors regulates a number of physiological processes, such as cell survival, proliferation, neural development, and axon and dendrite growth and patterning (1). In the adult nervous system, the Trk receptors regulate synaptic strength and plasticity. TrkA regulates proliferation and is important for development and maturation of the nervous system (2). Phosphorylation at Tyr490 is required for Shc association and activation of the Ras-MAP kinase cascade (3,4). Residues Tyr674/675 lie within the catalytic domain, and phosphorylation at these sites reflects TrkA kinase activity (3-6). Point mutations, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements (chimeras) cause ligand-independent receptor dimerization and activation of TrkA (7-10). TrkA is activated in many malignancies including breast, ovarian, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas (8-13). Research studies suggest that expression of TrkA in neuroblastomas may be a good prognostic marker as TrkA signals growth arrest and differentiation of cells originating from the neural crest (10).

$122
20 µl
$307
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Met, a high affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, also known as scatter factor) is a disulfide-linked heterodimer made of 45 kDa α- and 145 kDa β-subunits (1,2). The α-subunit and the amino-terminal region of the β-subunit form the extracellular domain. The remainder of the β-chain spans the plasma membrane and contains a cytoplasmic region with tyrosine kinase activity. Interaction of Met with HGF results in autophosphorylation at multiple tyrosines, which recruit several downstream signaling components, including Gab1, c-Cbl, and PI3 kinase (3). These fundamental events are important for all of the biological functions involving Met kinase activity. The addition of a phosphate at cytoplasmic Tyr1003 is essential for Met protein ubiquitination and degradation (4). Phosphorylation at Tyr1234/1235 in the Met kinase domain is critical for kinase activation. Phosphorylation at Tyr1349 in the Met cytoplasmic domain provides a direct binding site for Gab1 (5). Research studies have shown that altered Met levels and/or tyrosine kinase activities are found in several types of tumors, including renal, colon, and breast. Thus, investigators have concluded that Met is an attractive potential cancer therapeutic and diagnostic target (6,7).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Pacific Blue™ fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Acetyl-Histone H3 (Lys9) (C5B11) Rabbit mAb #9649.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).