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Product listing: LAMTOR5/HBXIP (D4V4S) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID O43504 #14633 to DLAT (4A4-B6-C10) Mouse mAb, UniProt ID P10515 #12362

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Late endosomal/lysosomal adaptor and MAPK and MTOR activator 5 (LAMTOR5) is an essential component of the ragulator protein complex that is encoded by the HBXIP gene (1). The ragulator complex also includes LAMTOR1/C11orf59, LAMTOR2/ROBLD3, LAMTOR3/MAPKSP1, and LAMTOR4/C7orf59 (1,2). Research studies demonstrate that the ragulator complex localizes to the lysosomal membrane and is essential for the lysosomal localization of Rag GTPases and mTORC1 as well as the subsequent activation of mTORC1 in response to amino acid signaling (1-3). Additional research studies indicate that HBXIP regulates hepatitis B virus x (HBx) protein activity and is a transcription coactivator involved in the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: AU-rich element RNA binding protein 1 (AUF1) is also known as heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein D (hnRNP D). AUF1 binds to the AU rich element (ARE) of target mRNA and regulates mRNA decay (1,2). It has a broad range of target genes including IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, Myc, TNF-α, and cyclin D1 (2). Binding of AUF1 to Myc mRNA also affects translation of Myc (3). Recent studies have provided evidence that AUF1 is also involved in the regulation of transcription. AUF1 binds to the promoters of various genes including complement receptor 2 (4), enkephalin (5), and α-fetoprotein (6). AUF1 also binds to the telomerase catalytic subunit Tert promoter and the G-rich telomeric repeat, thus regulating telomere maintenance and normal aging (7,8). AUF1 has four isoforms produced by alternative splicing of a single transcript: p37, p40, p42, and p45 (9,10). All AUF1 isoforms shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm (11, 12). These isoforms have distinct localization and bind to different target mRNAs that contribute to the diversity of AUF1 function (2).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Translation repressor protein 4E-BP1 (also known as PHAS-1) inhibits cap-dependent translation by binding to the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 disrupts this interaction and results in activation of cap-dependent translation (1). Both the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway and FRAP/mTOR kinase regulate 4E-BP1 activity (2,3). Multiple 4E-BP1 residues are phosphorylated in vivo (4). While phosphorylation by FRAP/mTOR at Thr37 and Thr46 does not prevent the binding of 4E-BP1 to eIF4E, it is thought to prime 4E-BP1 for subsequent phosphorylation at Ser65 and Thr70 (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: CD82 (KAI1) belongs to the tetraspanin family, which is characterized by four transmembrane domains, one short extracellular domain (ECL1), and one long extracellular domain (ECL2). CD82 does not have enzymatic activity and appears to function by regulating the trafficking of other proteins and organization of the cell membrane (1). CD82 was originally described as a costimulator for T cells that directly associates with CD4 and CD8, and was subsequently identified during a screen as a metastasis suppressor in prostate cancer (2,3). CD82 has since been found to act as a metastasis suppressor in a variety of cancers, and its downregulation is associated with poor prognosis in research studies (4-6). CD82 suppresses metastasis through multiple mechanisms including inhibition of cell motility and invasion by modulating c-Met and the urokinase plasminogen activator surface receptor (uPAR), as well as promotion of homotypic cell-cell adhesion by stabilizing interactions between E-cadherin and β-catenin (7-9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fas-associated death domain (FADD or Mort 1) functions as an important adaptor in coupling death signaling from membrane receptors, such as the Fas ligand and TNF family (DR3, DR4 and DR5), to caspase-8 (1,2). FADD has a carboxy-terminal death domain, which interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of the membrane receptor, and an amino-terminal death effector domain, which interacts with caspase-8. Clustering of the receptors upon stimulation brings about FADD and caspase-8 oligomerization, activating the caspase signaling pathway. Human FADD is phosphorylated mainly at Ser194, while mouse FADD is phosphorylated at Ser191. In both cases, the phosphorylation is cell cycle-dependent (3) and may be related to its regulatory role in embryonic development and cell cycle progression (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Set1 histone methyltransferase protein was first identified in yeast as part of the Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complex, which methylates histone H3 at Lys4 and functions as a transcriptional co-activator (1). While yeast contain only one known Set1 protein, mammals contain six Set1-related proteins: SET1A, SET1B, MLL1, MLL2, MLL3, and MLL4, all of which assemble into COMPASS-like complexes and methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (2,3). These Set1-related proteins are each found in distinct protein complexes, all of which share the common subunits WDR5, RBBP5, ASH2L, CXXC1, and DPY30, which are required for proper complex assembly and modulation of histone methyltransferase activity (2-6). MLL1 and MLL2 complexes contain the additional protein subunit, menin (6).MLL2, also known as histone-lysine N-methyltransferase 2B (KMT2B), functions to activate gene expression by mediating tri-methylation of histone H3 lysine 4 at the promoters of genes involved in embryogenesis and hematopoiesis, and is required for histone H3 lysine 4 tri-methylation at bivalent promoters in embryonic stem cells (7). Like MLL1, MLL2 is a large protein made up of approximately 2700 amino acids that is cleaved by the Taspase 1 threonine endopeptidase to form N-terminal (MLL2-N) and C-terminal (MLL2-C) fragments, both of which are subunits of the functional MLL2/COMPASS complex. MLL2-N, MLL2-C, WDR5, RBBP5, and ASH2L define the core catalytic component of the MLL2/COMPASS complex, which is recruited to target genes to regulate transcription. MLL1 gene translocations are often associated with various hematological malignancies and thought to be a driving component of these types of leukemia. MLL2 is required for memory formation, proper glucose homeostasis, and cardiac lineage differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (8-11). A recent study has shown that MLL2 is required for survival of MLL-AF9-transformed cells, implicating MLL2 as a potential modulator of MLL1-rearranged leukemias (12). Mutations in MLL2 cause complex early-onset dystonia, and overexpression of MLL2 is associated with gastrointestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (13,14).

$19
50 ml
Ultrapure Nuclease-free Water from Cell Signaling Technology is non-DEPC treated, endotoxin-tested, and contains no detectable endo- and exo-nucleases. Following stringent purification, it is 0.1 µm filtered into a polycarbonate bottle and autoclaved. It is suitable for molecular biology applications that require water devoid of nucleases.
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected
$115
20 µl
$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The MSLN gene encodes a 69 kDa precursor protein that is proteolytically cleaved to yield Megakaryocyte Potentiating Factor (MPF) and a GPI-anchored membrane protein termed mesothelin (1). Expression of (cleaved) mesothelin is largely confined to mesothelial cells of normal pleura, pericardium, and peritoneum, but has been reported to be overexpressed in some cancers, including mesothelioma, and some pancreatic and ovarian adenocarcinomas (1,2). Although suggested to be involved in cell adhesion, the physiological functions of mesothelin have not been determined. It is known, however, that mesothelin can be shed from the cell surface following cleavage by TNF-α converting enzyme. Research studies show that serum levels of mesothelin are markedly increased in patients with mesothelioma and ovarian cancer (1), suggesting that serum mesothelin levels may have utility as a cancer biomarker (1-3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescence of rat cerebellum. The unconjugated antibody #3670 reacts with human, mouse and rat GFAP protein. CST expects that GFAP (GA5) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor® 555 Conjugate) will also recognize GFAP in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are specifically expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins in epithelial cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glial cells, desmin in skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells, vimentin in cells of mesenchymal origin, and neurofilaments in neurons. GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). In addition, GFAP intermediate filaments are also present in nonmyelin-forming Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: β-transducin repeat-containing protein (β-TrCP or FBW1A) is an F-box family protein characterized by the presence of the protein-protein mediating F-box domain first described in cyclin F. F-box proteins act as substrate adaptors that target proteins containing a specific phosphorylated sequence element, referred to as a phosphodegron, to the SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for ubiquitination (1,2). β-TrCP targets many important proteins with diverse functions, such as p53, H-Ras, Smad4, IκBα, β-catenin, and the cell cycle checkpoint protein claspin, for ubiquitin-mediated degradation (3-5). Research studies have shown that inhibition of β-TrCP expression has a demonstrated benefit in the treatment of prostate cancer (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

PTMScan® Technology employs a proprietary methodology from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) for peptide enrichment by immunoprecipitation using a specific bead-conjugated antibody in conjunction with liquid chromatography (LC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for quantitative profiling of post-translational modification (PTM) sites in cellular proteins. These include phosphorylation (PhosphoScan®), ubiquitination (UbiScan®), acetylation (AcetylScan®), and methylation (MethylScan®), among others. PTMScan® Technology enables researchers to isolate, identify, and quantitate large numbers of post-translationally modified cellular peptides with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, providing a global overview of PTMs in cell and tissue samples without preconceived biases about where these modified sites occur (1). For more information on PTMScan® Proteomics Services, please visit www.cellsignal.com/services/index.html.
$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated α-Tubulin (DM1A) Mouse mAb #3873.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Phospho-Smad3 (Ser423/425) Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that recognizes endogenous levels of Smad3 (Ser423/425) protein. A Smad2/3 Mouse Antibody has been coated on the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, Smad3 proteins (phospho and nonphospho) are captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a Phospho-Smad3 (Ser423/425) Rabbit Detection Antibody is added to detect captured phospho-Smad3 (Ser423/425) proteins. Anti-rabbit IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate TMB is added to develop color. The magnitude of the absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of phospho-Smad3 (Ser423/425) proteins.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human, Mink, Mouse

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmit TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, and 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved carboxy terminal SSXS motif. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad (Smad4), allowing translocation of the complex to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Mutations in the MEN1 tumor suppressor gene cause multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), an autosomal dominant familial tumor syndrome typified by tumors of the pituitary, parathyroid, lung, and enteropancreatic endocrine tissues (1,2). Patients with this tumor syndrome have inherited either missense or truncation mutations in one allele of the MEN1 gene, while the other allele is subject to loss of heterozygosity in tumors from these patients (1,2). Menin, the protein product of the MEN1 gene, is a component of the mixed-lineage leukemia protein (MLL)-containing histone methyltransferase complex that facilitates methylation of histone H3 Lys4 to promote transcriptional activation (3,4). Menin functions to suppress proliferation of pancreatic islet cells, at least in part through MLL-mediated activation of the p18INK4c (p18) and p27CIP/KIP (p27) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes (5,6). Loss of Menin leads to a decrease in methylation of histone H3 Lys4 and decreased expression of the p18 and p27 genes, leading to hyperplasia (5,6). In contrast to its role as a tumor suppressor in endocrine cells, Menin has been shown to promote proliferation in leukemia cells driven by MLL-fusion proteins. Menin is essential for oncogenic MLL-fusion-protein-mediated transformation of bone marrow cells and is required for histone H3 Lys4 methylation and expression of the Hoxa9 gene (7,8). Menin interacts with a wide range of proteins, including JunD, SMAD family members, estrogen receptor, vitamin D receptor, PEM, NFκB, FANCD2, RPA2, NMMHC II-A, GFAP, vimentin, and Hsp70 suggesting additional roles in transcriptional regulation, DNA processing and repair, cytoskeleton organization, and protein degradation (9,10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Research studies have implicated the HER/ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase family in normal development, cardiac function and cancer (1,2). HER4/ErbB4, like other family members, has four ectodomains, a single transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic tail containing the active tyrosine kinase domain (3). By binding to neuregulins and/or EGF family ligands, ErbB4 forms either a homodimer or heterodimer with other ErbB family members, which results in receptor activation and signaling (3). ErbB4 is ubiquitously expressed with the highest expression occurring in brain and heart. The expression of ErbB4 in breast cancer, pediatric brain cancer and other types of carcinomas has been reported in research studies suggesting that ErbB4 expression is involved in both normal tissue development and carcinogenesis (3).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Cleaved PARP (Asp214) (D64E10) XP® Rabbit mAb #5625.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Forkhead family of transcription factors is involved in tumorigenesis of rhabdomyosarcoma and acute leukemias (1-3). Within the family, three members (FoxO1, FoxO4, and FoxO3a) have sequence similarity to the nematode orthologue DAF-16, which mediates signaling via a pathway involving IGFR1, PI3K, and Akt (4-6). Active forkhead members act as tumor suppressors by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Increased expression of any FoxO member results in the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p27 Kip1. Forkhead transcription factors also play a part in TGF-β-mediated upregulation of p21 Cip1, a process negatively regulated through PI3K (7). Increased proliferation results when forkhead transcription factors are inactivated through phosphorylation by Akt at Thr24, Ser256, and Ser319, which results in nuclear export and inhibition of transcription factor activity (8). Forkhead transcription factors can also be inhibited by the deacetylase sirtuin (SirT1) (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Members of the F-box family of proteins are characterized by the approximate 40 amino acid F-box motif named after cyclin F (1,2). F-box proteins constitute one of the four subunits of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex. The substrate specificity of SCF complexes is determined by the interchangeable F-box proteins, which act as adaptors by associating with phosphorylated substrate proteins and recruiting them to the SCF core. F-box proteins contain two fundamental domains: the F-box motif mediates binding to Skp1 and a leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain mediates substrate interactions.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
PathScan® Phospho-FGF Receptor 1 (panTyr) Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated FGFR1 protein. A FGFR1 Rabbit mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, both phospho- and nonphospho-FGFR1 proteins are captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, Phospho-Tyrosine Mouse Detection Antibody is added to detect captured tyrosine-phosphorylated FGFR1 proteins. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of absorbance for the developed color is proportional to the quantity of tyrosine-phosphorylated FGFR1 protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produce mitogenic and angiogenic effects in target cells by signaling through cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. There are four members of the FGF receptor family: FGFR1 (flg), FGFR2 (bek, KGFR), FGFR3, and FGFR4. Each receptor contains an extracellular ligand binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic kinase domain (1). Following ligand binding and dimerization, the receptors are phosphorylated at specific tyrosine residues (2). Seven tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of FGFR1 can be phosphorylated: Tyr463, 583, 585, 653, 654, 730, and 766. Tyr653 and Tyr654 are important for catalytic activity of activated FGFR and are essential for signaling (3). The other phosphorylated tyrosine residues may provide docking sites for downstream signaling components such as Crk and PLCγ (4,5).

$260
200 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: At least four distinct polo-like kinases exist in mammalian cells: PLK1, PLK2, PLK3, and PLK4/SAK (1). PLK1 apparently plays many roles during mitosis, particularly in regulating mitotic entry and exit. The mitosis promoting factor (MPF), cdc2/cyclin B1, is activated by dephosphorylation of cdc2 (Thr14/Tyr15) by cdc25C. PLK1 phosphorylates cdc25C at Ser198 and cyclin B1 at Ser133 causing translocation of these proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus (2-5). PLK1 phosphorylation of Myt1 at Ser426 and Thr495 has been proposed to inactivate Myt1, one of the kinases known to phosphorylate cdc2 at Thr14/Tyr15 (6). Polo-like kinases also phosphorylate the cohesin subunit SCC1, causing cohesin displacement from chromosome arms that allow for proper cohesin localization to centromeres (7). Mitotic exit requires activation of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) (8), a ubiquitin ligase responsible for removal of cohesin at centromeres, and degradation of securin, cyclin A, cyclin B1, Aurora A, and cdc20 (9). PLK1 phosphorylation of the APC subunits Apc1, cdc16, and cdc27 has been demonstrated in vitro and has been proposed as a mechanism by which mitotic exit is regulated (10,11).Substitution of Thr210 with Asp has been reported to elevate PLK1 kinase activity and delay/arrest cells in mitosis, while a Ser137Asp substitution leads to S-phase arrest (12). In addition, while DNA damage has been found to inhibit PLK1 kinase activity, the Thr210Asp mutant is resistant to this inhibition (13). PLK1 has been reported to be phosphorylated in vivo at Ser137 and Thr210 in mitosis; DNA damage prevents phosphorylation at these sites (14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PAR2 (F2RL1) belongs to the PAR (Protease-activated Receptor) family of G protein-coupled receptors. These membrane receptors are activated through N-terminal cleavage of the receptor by a serine protease such as thrombin, trypsin, or matrix metalloproteinases (1,2). This cleavage exposes the ‘tethered-ligand’ fragment of the receptor, which binds to a second extracellular loop of the receptor and leads to receptor activation. PAR2 is specifically activated by trypsin or trypsin-like proteases. Activated PAR2 stimulates phosphoinositide hydrolysis and calcium mobilization, interacts with β-arrestin, and eventually leads to ERK activation (3). PAR2 expression and activation are mainly associated with inflammatory diseases (3), but may also play a role in cancer development (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Set1 histone methyltransferase protein was first identified in yeast as part of the Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complex, which methylates histone H3 at Lys4 and functions as a transcriptional co-activator (1). While yeast contain only one known Set1 protein, six Set1-related proteins exist in mammals: SET1A, SET1B, MLL1, MLL2, MLL3, and MLL4, all of which assemble into COMPASS-like complexes and methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (2,3). These Set1-related proteins are each found in distinct protein complexes, all of which share the common subunits WDR5, RBBP5, ASH2L, CXXC1 and DPY30. These subunits are required for proper complex assembly and modulation of histone methyltransferase activity (2-6). MLL1 and MLL2 complexes contain the additional protein subunit, menin (6). Like yeast Set1, all six Set1-related mammalian proteins methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (2-6). MLL translocations are found in a large number of hematological malignancies, suggesting that Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complexes play a critical role in leukemogenesis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Enhancer of mRNA decapping 4 (EDC4) was originally identified as the autoantigen Ge-1 from a Sjögren's syndrome patient later diagnosed with primary biliary cirrhosis (1). EDC4 (also known as HEDLS) was later identified as an essential component of cytoplasmic P-bodies responsible for mRNA decapping and degradation (2). Identified EDC4 protein is found as a pair of isoforms generated by alternative splicing and contains several WD domains and a putative nuclear localization signal. EDC4 co-localizes with other P-body decapping proteins such as DCP1A, DCP2 and GW182 (2,3). Experimental evidence suggests that EDC4 may be involved in miRNA-mediated translation repression (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (DLAT) transfers an acetyl group from pyruvate to CoA to synthesize acetyl-CoA (1-4). This protein, also known as the E2 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2), has been implicated in the literature as the primary autoantigen in primary biliary cirrhosis (2-5). Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMAs) are likely formed when DLAT is exposed to the immune system in apoptotic cells of the bile duct (3,5). Research studies have shown that in some cases, cosmetics, NSAIDs, chewing gum, acetaminophen, and other compounds could trigger exposure of DLAT in sensitive individuals (3). The presence of AMAs is often detectable before disease diagnosis (4,5). Research studies have also shown that activation of the Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR-3) pathway is involved in the progression from a subclinical to clinical state (4).