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Product listing: BRD4 (E2A7X) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID O60885 #13440 to TFEB Antibody, UniProt ID P19484 #4240

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) is a member of the bromodomains and extra terminal (BET) family of proteins, which also includes BRD2, BRD3, and BRDT (1-3). BET family proteins contain two tandem bromodomains and an extra terminal (ET) domain, and bind acetyl lysine residues (3). BRD4 is a chromatin-binding protein with a preference for Lys14 on histone H3 as well as Lys5 and Lys12 on histone H4 (4). BRD4 chromatin binding occurs throughout the cell cycle, including condensed mitotic chromosomes, when the majority of genes are silenced (5). BRD4 association with chromatin during mitosis is thought to be an important part of the bookmarking mechanism to accelerate re-activation of the silenced genes upon exit from mitosis (2,6). BRD4 has been shown to facilitate transcription by recruiting the positive transcription elongation factor b (pTEFb) complex that phosphorylates Ser2 of the heptapeptide repeat of the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, promoting transcription elongation (3,7,8). In addition, BRD4 has been found to be part of the super elongation complex and the polymerase associated factor complex (PAFc) in MLL-fusion derived leukemia cell lines, demonstrating a role for BRD4 in the regulation of transcription elongation (9). Research studies have shown that BRD4 (and BET family proteins) may be promising therapeutic targets for various Myc-driven cancers, such as Burkitt’s lymphoma and certain acute myeloid leukemias (1,10,11). Investigators have found molecular inhibition of BET proteins to be effective in inducing apoptosis in various MLL-fusion driven leukemic cell lines by competing BRD3 and BRD4 from chromatin, leading to reduced expression of Bcl-2, Myc, and CDK6 (9). BET inhibition has also been shown to have antitumor activities against nuclear protein in testis (NUT) midline carcinoma cell lines and xenografts in mice where BRD4 is found to be a frequent translocation partner of the NUT protein (12). In addition, BRD4 regulates the expression of some inflammatory genes, and inhibition of BRD4 (and BET family proteins) chromatin binding causes reduced expression of a subset of inflammatory genes in macrophages, leading to protection against endotoxic shock and sepsis (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are specifically expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins in epithelial cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glial cells, desmin in skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells, vimentin in cells of mesenchymal origin, and neurofilaments in neurons. GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). In addition, GFAP intermediate filaments are also present in nonmyelin-forming Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (3).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Phospho-c-Jun (Ser63) Chemiluminescent Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of phospho-c-Jun (Ser63) protein with a chemiluminescent readout. Chemiluminescent ELISAs often have a wider dynamic range and higher sensitivity than conventional chromogenic detection. This chemiluminescent ELISA, which is offered in low volume microplates, shows increased signal and sensitivity while using a smaller sample size. A phospho-c-Jun (Ser63) rabbit mAb has been coated on the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, phospho-c-Jun protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, c-Jun mouse mAb is added to detect the captured phospho-c-Jun protein. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. Chemiluminescent reagent is added for signal development. The magnitude of light emission, measured in relative light units (RLU), is proportional to the quantity of phospho-c-Jun (Ser63) protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Background: c-Jun is a member of the Jun family containing c-Jun, JunB, and JunD, and is a component of the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1). AP-1 is composed of dimers of Fos, Jun, and ATF family members and binds to and activates transcription at TRE/AP-1 elements (reviewed in 1). Extracellular signals including growth factors, chemokines, and stress activate AP-1-dependent transcription. The transcriptional activity of c-Jun is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser63 and Ser73 through SAPK/JNK (reviewed in 2). Knock-out studies in mice have shown that c-Jun is essential for embryogenesis (3), and subsequent studies have demonstrated roles for c-Jun in various tissues and developmental processes including axon regeneration (4), liver regeneration (5), and T cell development (6). AP-1 regulated genes exert diverse biological functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, as well as transformation, invasion and metastasis, depending on cell type and context (7-9). Other target genes regulate survival, as well as hypoxia and angiogenesis (8,10). Research studies have implicated c-Jun as a promising therapeutic target for cancer, vascular remodeling, acute inflammation, and rheumatoid arthritis (11,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of proteins activated in response to nutrient deprivation and in neurodegenerative conditions (1). One of the proteins critical to this process is Beclin-1, the mammalian orthologue of the yeast autophagy protein Apg6/Vps30 (2). Beclin-1 can complement defects in yeast autophagy caused by loss of Apg6 and can also stimulate autophagy when overexpressed in mammalian cells (3). Mammalian Beclin-1 was originally isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen for Bcl-2 interacting proteins and has been shown to interact with Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, but not with Bax or Bak (4). While Beclin-1 is generally ubiquitously expressed, research studies have shown it is monoallelically deleted in 40-75% of sporadic human breast and ovarian cancers (5). Beclin-1 is localized within cytoplasmic structures including the mitochondria, although overexpression of Beclin-1 reveals some nuclear staining and CRM1-dependent nuclear export (6). Investigators have demonstrated that Beclin-1-/- mice die early in embryogenesis and Beclin-1-/+ mice have a high incidence of spontaneous tumors. Stem cells from the null mice demonstrate an altered autophagic response, although responses to apoptosis appeared normal (7). Researchers have also found that overexpression of Beclin-1 in virally infected neurons in vivo resulted in significant protection against Sindbis virus-induced disease and neuronal apoptosis (4).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Fos family of nuclear oncogenes includes c-Fos, FosB, Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1), and Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) (1). While most Fos proteins exist as a single isoform, the FosB protein exists as two isoforms: full-length FosB and a shorter form, FosB2 (Delta FosB), which lacks the carboxy-terminal 101 amino acids (1-3). The expression of Fos proteins is rapidly and transiently induced by a variety of extracellular stimuli including growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, polypeptide hormones, and stress. Fos proteins dimerize with Jun proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) to form Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), a transcription factor that binds to TRE/AP-1 elements and activates transcription. Fos and Jun proteins contain the leucine-zipper motif that mediates dimerization and an adjacent basic domain that binds to DNA. The various Fos/Jun heterodimers differ in their ability to transactivate AP-1 dependent genes. In addition to increased expression, phosphorylation of Fos proteins by Erk kinases in response to extracellular stimuli may further increase transcriptional activity (4-6). Phosphorylation of c-Fos at Ser32 and Thr232 by Erk5 increases protein stability and nuclear localization (5). Phosphorylation of FRA1 at Ser252 and Ser265 by Erk1/2 increases protein stability and leads to overexpression of FRA1 in cancer cells (6). Following growth factor stimulation, expression of FosB and c-Fos in quiescent fibroblasts is immediate, but very short-lived, with protein levels dissipating after several hours (7). FRA1 and FRA2 expression persists longer, and appreciable levels can be detected in asynchronously growing cells (8). Deregulated expression of c-Fos, FosB, or FRA2 can result in neoplastic cellular transformation; however, Delta FosB lacks the ability to transform cells (2,3).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis of human cells. The unconjugated antibody #4060 reacts with human, mouse, rat, hamster, bovine, D. melanogaster and zebra fish Phospho-Akt protein. CST expects that Phospho-Akt (Ser473) (D9E) XP® Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate) will also recognize Phospho-Akt in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Axl, Sky, and Mer are three members of a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family that share a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain and an extracellular domain similar to those seen in cell adhesion molecules. These RTKs bind the vitamin K-dependent protein growth-arrest-specific 6 (Gas6), which is structurally related to the protein S anticoagulation factor (1). Upon binding to its receptor, Gas6 activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream targets Akt and S6K, as well as NF-κB (2,3). A large body of evidence supports a role for Gas6/Axl signaling in cell growth and survival in normal and cancer cells (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-9 (ICE-LAP6, Mch6) is an important member of the cysteine aspartic acid protease (caspase) family (1,2). Upon apoptotic stimulation, cytochrome c released from mitochondria associates with the 47 kDa procaspase-9/Apaf-1. Apaf-1 mediated activation of caspase-9 involves intrinsic proteolytic processing resulting in cleavage at Asp315 and producing a p35 subunit. Another cleavage occurs at Asp330 producing a p37 subunit that can serve to amplify the apoptotic response (3-6). Cleaved caspase-9 further processes other caspase members, including caspase-3 and caspase-7, to initiate a caspase cascade, which leads to apoptosis (7-10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Nanog is a homeodomain-containing transcription factor that is essential for the maintenance of pluripotency and self renewal in embryonic stem cells (1). Nanog expression is controlled by a network of factors including Sox2 and the key pluripotency regulator Oct-4 (1). Recent advances in somatic cell reprogramming have utilized viral expression of combinations of transcription factors including nanog, Oct-4, Sox2, KLF4, c-Myc, and LIN28 (2,3).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a widely expressed cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinase involved in integrin-mediated signal transduction. It plays an important role in the control of several biological processes, including cell spreading, migration, and survival (1). Activation of FAK by integrin clustering leads to autophosphorylation at Tyr397, which is a binding site for the Src family kinases PI3K and PLCγ (2-5). Recruitment of Src family kinases results in the phosphorylation of Tyr407, Tyr576, and Tyr577 in the catalytic domain, and Tyr871 and Tyr925 in the carboxy-terminal region of FAK (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) is a member of the RUNX family of transcription factors. It is involved in osteoblast differentiation and skeletal morphogenesis. RUNX2 regulates the transcription of various genes, including osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin, via binding to the core site of the enhancers or promoters (1-3). RUNX2 is crucial for the maturation of osteoblasts and both intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Mutations in the corresponding RUNX2 gene have been associated with the bone development disorder cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) (4-6). RUNX2 is also abnormally expressed in various human cancers including prostate cancer and breast cancer. It plays an important role in migration, invasion, and bone metastasis of prostate and breast cancer cells (7-10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bcl-2 exerts a survival function in response to a wide range of apoptotic stimuli through inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome c release (1). It has been implicated in modulating mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and proton flux (2). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified within Bcl-2 including Thr56, Ser70, Thr74, and Ser87 (3). It has been suggested that these phosphorylation sites may be targets of the ASK1/MKK7/JNK1 pathway and that phosphorylation of Bcl-2 may be a marker for mitotic events (4,5). Mutation of Bcl-2 at Thr56 or Ser87 inhibits its anti-apoptotic activity during glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of T lymphocytes (6). Interleukin-3 and JNK-induced Bcl-2 phosphorylation at Ser70 may be required for its enhanced anti-apoptotic functions (7).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and referred to as autophagy-related (Atg) genes. Formation of the autophagosome involves a ubiquitin-like conjugation system in which Atg12 is covalently bound to Atg5 and targeted to autophagosome vesicles (4-6). This conjugation reaction is mediated by the ubiquitin E1-like enzyme Atg7 and the E2-like enzyme Atg10 (7,8).

PhosphoPlus® Duets from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) provide a means to assess protein activation status. Each Duet contains an activation-state and total protein antibody to your target of interest. These antibodies have been selected from CST's product offering based upon superior performance in specified applications.

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, FRAP, RAFT) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase (1-3) that functions as an ATP and amino acid sensor to balance nutrient availability and cell growth (4,5). When sufficient nutrients are available, mTOR responds to a phosphatidic acid-mediated signal to transmit a positive signal to p70 S6 kinase and participate in the inactivation of the eIF4E inhibitor, 4E-BP1 (6). These events result in the translation of specific mRNA subpopulations. mTOR is phosphorylated at Ser2448 via the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway and autophosphorylated at Ser2481 (7,8). mTOR plays a key role in cell growth and homeostasis and may be abnormally regulated in tumors. For these reasons, mTOR is currently under investigation as a potential target for anti-cancer therapy (9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 21-24 kDa integral proteins, caveolins, are the principal structural components of the cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae. Three members of the caveolin family (caveolin-1, -2, and -3) have been identified with different tissue distributions. Caveolins form hetero- and homo-oligomers that interact with cholesterol and other lipids (1). Caveolins are involved in diverse biological functions, including vesicular trafficking, cholesterol homeostasis, cell adhesion, and apoptosis, and are also implicated in neurodegenerative disease (2). Caveolins interact with multiple signaling molecules such as Gα subunit, tyrosine kinase receptors, PKCs, Src family tyrosine kinases, and eNOS (1,2). It is believed that caveolins serve as scaffolding proteins for the integration of signal transduction. Phosphorylation at Tyr14 is essential for caveolin association with SH2 or PTB domain-containing adaptor proteins such as GRB7 (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser80 regulates caveolin binding to the ER membrane and entry into the secretory pathway (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CD44 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction through its affinity for hyaluronic acid (HA) and possibly through other parts of the extracellular matrix (ECM). CD44 is highly polymorphic, possesses a number of alternative splice variants and undergoes extensive post-translational modifications (1,2). Increased surface levels of CD44 are characteristic of T cell activation, and expression of the protein is upregulated during the inflammatory response. Research studies have shown that interactions between CD44 and HER2 are linked to an increase in ovarian carcinoma cell growth (1-3). CD44 interacts with ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM), linking the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane and the ECM (4-6). CD44 is constitutively phosphorylated at Ser325 in resting cells. Activation of PKC results in phosphorylation of Ser291, dephosphorylation of Ser325, disassociation of ezrin from CD44, and directional motility (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: EEA1 is an early endosomal marker and a Rab5 effector protein essential for early endosomal membrane fusion and trafficking (1-2). The carboxy terminus of EEA1 contains a FYVE domain which binds to phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P), targeting EEA1 to early endosomes (3). The stable association of EEA1 with the endosomal membrane is regulated by PI3 kinase, Rab5 and calcium/calmodulin (4-6). Once on the membrane, EEA1 interacts with Rab5, NSF and syntaxin 13 to promote early endosomal membrane docking and fusion (7).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tuberin is a product of the TSC2 tumor suppressor gene and an important regulator of cell proliferation and tumor development (1). Mutations in either TSC2 or the related TSC1 (hamartin) gene cause tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by development of multiple, widespread non-malignant tumors (2). Tuberin is directly phosphorylated at Thr1462 by Akt/PKB (3). Phosphorylation at Thr1462 and Tyr1571 regulates tuberin-hamartin complexes and tuberin activity (3-5). In addition, tuberin inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which promotes inhibition of p70 S6 kinase, activation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1, an inhibitor of translation initiation), and eventual inhibition of translation (3,6,7).

$64
10 ml
Premium quality normal goat serum for use as blocking reagent and antibody diluent for chromogenic and fluorescent immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical assays. Typically, normal serum from the same species as the secondary antibody is used in the blocking and diluent buffers.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunofluorescence (Paraffin), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Vinculin is a cytoskeletal protein that plays an important role in the regulation of focal adhesions and embryonic development (1-4). Three structural vinculin domains include an amino-terminal head, a short, flexible proline-rich region and a carboxy-terminal tail (1). In the inactive state, the head and tail domains of vinculin interact to form a closed confirmation. The open and active form of vinculin translocates to focal adhesions where it is thought to be involved in anchoring F-actin to the membrane and regulation of cell migration (2). Phospholipid binding to the tail domain and subsequent phosphorylation of vinculin at Ser1033 and Ser1045 by PKC-α and Tyr100 and Tyr1065 by Src kinases weakens the head-tail interaction (5,6). This change in vinculin allows the binding of a number of other proteins, including talin, α-actinin and paxillin, which disrupts the head-tail interaction and initiates the conformational change from the inactive to active state (2,4). Vinculin deficiencies are associated with a decrease in cell adhesion and an increase in cell motility, suggesting a possible role in metastatic growth (7,8). This is supported by a demonstrated relationship between decreased vinculin expression and increased carcinogenesis and metastasis in colorectal carcinoma (9).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Stat5 is activated in response to a wide variety of ligands including IL-2, GM-CSF, growth hormone and prolactin. Phosphorylation at Tyr694 is obligatory for Stat5 activation (1,2). This phosphorylation is mediated by Src upon erythropoietin stimulation (3). Stat5 is constitutively active in some leukemic cell types (4). Phosphorylated Stat5 is found in some endothelial cells treated with IL-3, which suggests its involvement in angiogenesis and cell motility (5). Stat5a and Stat5b are independently regulated and activated in various cell types. For instance, interferon treatment predominantly activates Stat5a in U-937 cells and Stat5b in HeLa cells (6).

$40
25 ml
$82
100 ml
SignalStain® Antibody Diluent is for use in immunohistochemical assays. It yields superior staining with a number of antibodies. This diluent can improve IHC signal and background; however, it is not compatible with all of Cell Signaling Technology's products that are recommended for use in immunohistochemical assays. Please consult the antibody datasheet to determine if SignalStain® Antibody Diluent is recommended for your product of interest.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin and actin-depolymerization factor (ADF) are members of a family of essential conserved small actin-binding proteins that play pivotal roles in cytokinesis, endocytosis, embryonic development, stress response, and tissue regeneration (1). In response to stimuli, cofilin promotes the regeneration of actin filaments by severing preexisting filaments (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at Ser3 of cofilin (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser3 also regulates cofilin translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair (1). Activation of ATM by autophosphorylation on Ser1981 occurs in response to exposed DNA double stranded breaks. ATM kinase regulates a number of proteins involved in cell cycle checkpoint control, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Known substrates include p53, Chk2, Chk1, CtIP, 4E-BP1, BRCA1, RPA3, H2A.X, SMC1, FANCD2, Rad17, Artemis, Nbs1, and the I-2 regulatory subunit of PP1 (1,2). Mutations in the corresponding ATM gene result in ataxia telangiectasia (AT), an autosomal recessive disease characterized by uncoordinated muscle movement and neurodegeneration. Cells from AT patients display defective DNA damage-induced checkpoint activation, sensitivity to radiation, and a higher frequency of chromosome breakage (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factor EB (TFEB) is a member of the Myc-related, bHLH leucine-zipper family of transcription factors that drives the expression of a network of genes known as the Coordinated Lysosomal Expression and Regulation (CLEAR) network (1,2). TFEB specifically recognizes and binds regulatory sequences within the CLEAR box (GTCACGTGAC) of lysosomal and autophagy genes, resulting in the up-regulated expression of genes involved in lysosome biogenesis and function, and regulation of autophagy (1,2). TFEB is activated in response to nutrient deprivation, stimulating translocation to the nucleus where it forms homo- or heterooligomers with other members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MiTF) subfamily and resulting in up-regulation of autophagosomes and lysosomes (3-5). Recently, it has been shown that TFEB is a component of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1), which regulates the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of TFEB in response to cellular starvation and stress (6-9). During normal growth conditions, TFEB is phosphorylated at Ser211 in an mTORC1-dependent manner. Phosphorylation promotes association of TFEB with 14-3-3 family proteins and retention in the cytosol. Inhibition of mTORC1 results in a loss of TFEB phosphorylation, dissociation of the TFEB/14-3-3 complex, and rapid transport of TFEB to the nucleus where it increases transcription of CLEAR and autophagy genes (10). TFEB has also been shown to be activated in a nutrient-dependent manner by p42 MAP kinase (Erk2). TFEB is phosphorylated at Ser142 by Erk2 in response to nutrient deprivation, resulting in nuclear localization and activation, and indicating that pathways other than mTOR contribute to nutrient sensing via TFEB (3).