Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Product listing: Non-phospho (Active) β-Catenin (Ser45) (D2U8Y) XP® Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 488 Conjugate), UniProt ID P35222 #70034 to Jak2 (D2E12) XP® Rabbit mAb (PE Conjugate), UniProt ID O60674 #5941

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric and immunofluorescence analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Non-phospho (Active) β-Catenin (Ser45) (D2U8Y) XP® Rabbit mAb #19807.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: β-Catenin is a key downstream effector in the Wnt signaling pathway (1). It is implicated in two major biological processes in vertebrates: early embryonic development (2) and tumorigenesis (3). CK1 phosphorylates β-catenin at Ser45. This phosphorylation event primes β-catenin for subsequent phosphorylation by GSK-3β (4-6). GSK-3β destabilizes β-catenin by phosphorylating it at Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41 (7). Mutations at these sites result in the stabilization of β-catenin protein levels and have been found in many tumor cell lines (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycoprotein non-metastatic gene B (GPNMB) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein over expressed in many types of cancer. The GPNMB glycoprotein is involved in many physiological processes, including mediating transport of late melanosomes to keratinocytes (1), regulating osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function (2), stimulating dendritic cell maturation, promoting adhesion of dendritic cells to endothelial cells (3), enhancing autophagosome fusion to lysomes in tissue repair, and regulating degradation of cellular debris (4,5).While typical GPNMB expression is seen in tissues including skin, heart, kidney, lung, liver, and skeletal muscle (3,6), research studies show elevated GPNMB expression often contributes to the metastatic phenotype in numerous cancers (reviewed in 7). GPNMB is typically localized to intracellular compartments in normal cells (1,8), but investigators found it primarily on the cell surface of tumor cells (9,10). Differential localization and expression, and the role of GPNMB as a tumor promoter in many cancer types make this protein a viable therapeutic target (11).The GPNMB ectodomain can be cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases and shed from the cell surface (12). Research studies identify the sheddase ADAM10 as one peptidase responsible for cleavage of the GPNMB ectodomain at the surface of breast cancer cells. Shedded GPNMB ectodomains may promote angiogenesis by inducing endothelial cell migration (13).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2) are activated by ligands binding to a number of associated cytokine receptors (1). Upon cytokine receptor activation, Jak proteins become autophosphorylated and phosphorylate their associated receptors to provide multiple binding sites for signaling proteins. These associated signaling proteins, such as Stats (2), Shc (3), insulin receptor substrates (4), and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (5), typically contain SH2 or other phospho-tyrosine-binding domains.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produce mitogenic and angiogenic effects in target cells by signaling through cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. There are four members of the FGF receptor family: FGFR1 (flg), FGFR2 (bek, KGFR), FGFR3, and FGFR4. Each receptor contains an extracellular ligand binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic kinase domain (1). Following ligand binding and dimerization, the receptors are phosphorylated at specific tyrosine residues (2). Seven tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of FGFR1 can be phosphorylated: Tyr463, 583, 585, 653, 654, 730, and 766. Tyr653 and Tyr654 are important for catalytic activity of activated FGFR and are essential for signaling (3). The other phosphorylated tyrosine residues may provide docking sites for downstream signaling components such as Crk and PLCγ (4,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: p130 Cas (Crk-associated substrate) is a docking protein containing multiple protein-protein interaction domains. The amino-terminal SH3 domain may function as a molecular switch regulating CAS tyrosine phosphorylation, as it interacts with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (1) and the FAK-related kinase PYK2 (2), as well as the tyrosine phosphatases PTP-1B (3) and PTP-PEST (4). The carboxy-terminal Src binding domain (SBD) contains a proline-rich motif that mediates interaction with the SH3 domains of Src-family kinases (SFKs) and a tyrosine phosphorylation site (Tyr668 and/or Tyr670) that can promote interaction with the SH2 domain of SFKs (5). The p130 Cas central substrate domain, the major region of tyrosine phosphorylation, is characterized by 15 tyrosines present in Tyr-X-X-Pro (YXXP) motifs, including Tyr165, 249, and 410. When phosphorylated, most YXXP motifs are able to serve as docking sites for proteins with SH2 or PTB domains including adaptors, C-Crk, Nck, and inositol 5'-phosphatase 2 (SHIP2) (6). The tyrosine phosphorylation of p130 Cas has been implicated as a key signaling step in integrin control of normal cellular behaviors including motility, proliferation, and survival. Aberrant Cas tyrosine phosphorylation may contribute to cell transformation by certain oncoproteins (5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Pacific Blue™ fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry in monkey cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated DYKDDDDK Tag (D6W5B) Rabbit mAb (Binds to same epitope as Sigma's Anti-FLAG® M2 Antibody) #14793.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycoprotein non-metastatic gene B (GPNMB) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein over expressed in many types of cancer. The GPNMB glycoprotein is involved in many physiological processes, including mediating transport of late melanosomes to keratinocytes (1), regulating osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function (2), stimulating dendritic cell maturation, promoting adhesion of dendritic cells to endothelial cells (3), enhancing autophagosome fusion to lysomes in tissue repair, and regulating degradation of cellular debris (4,5).While typical GPNMB expression is seen in tissues including skin, heart, kidney, lung, liver, and skeletal muscle (3,6), research studies show elevated GPNMB expression often contributes to the metastatic phenotype in numerous cancers (reviewed in 7). GPNMB is typically localized to intracellular compartments in normal cells (1,8), but investigators found it primarily on the cell surface of tumor cells (9,10). Differential localization and expression, and the role of GPNMB as a tumor promoter in many cancer types make this protein a viable therapeutic target (11).The GPNMB ectodomain can be cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases and shed from the cell surface (12). Research studies identify the sheddase ADAM10 as one peptidase responsible for cleavage of the GPNMB ectodomain at the surface of breast cancer cells. Shedded GPNMB ectodomains may promote angiogenesis by inducing endothelial cell migration (13).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Phospho-Ret (panTyr) Chemiluminescent Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated Ret protein with a chemiluminescent readout. Chemiluminescent ELISAs often have a wider dynamic range and higher sensitivity than conventional chromogenic detection. This chemiluminescent ELISA, which is offered in low volume microplates, shows increased signal and sensitivity while using a smaller sample size. A Ret Rabbit mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, Ret protein (phospho and nonphospho) is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a Phospho-Tyrosine Mouse Detection mAb is added to detect captured tyrosine-phosphorylated Ret protein. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. Chemiluminescent reagent is added for signal development. The magnitude of light emission, measured in relative light units (RLU), is proportional to the quantity of tyrosine-phosphorylated Ret protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The Ret proto-oncogene (c-Ret) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that functions as a multicomponent receptor complex in conjunction with other membrane-bound, ligand-binding GDNF family receptors (1). Ligands that bind the Ret receptor include the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its congeners neurturin, persephin, and artemin (2-4). Research studies have shown that alterations in the corresponding RET gene are associated with diseases including papillary thyroid carcinoma, multiple endocrine neoplasia (type 2A and 2B), familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, and a congenital developmental disorder known as Hirschsprung’s disease (1,3). The Tyr905 residue located in the Ret kinase domain plays a crucial role in Ret catalytic and biological activity. Substitution of Phe for Tyr at position 905 dramatically inhibits Ret autophosphorylation activity (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). It is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but is also associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and is directed by a number of autophagy-related (Atg) genes.Vacuolar trafficking and autophagy are controlled by the class III type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, which generates phosphoinositide-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) (4,5). Atg18 and Atg21 are two related WD-repeat proteins that bind PtdIns3P via a conserved Phe-Arg-Arg-Gly motif (6,7). It has been shown that Atg18 binds to Atg2 and that this complex is directed to vacuolar membranes by its interaction with PtdIns3P (8). Human orthologs of Atg18 and Atg21 were identified as members of the WD-repeat protein Interacting with Phosphoinositides (WIPI) family (9-11). WIPI1 (also called WIPI49) and WIPI2 have been shown to translocate from several vacuolar compartments to LC3-positive autophagosomes during autophagy; this translocation may be used as an autophagy marker (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The human retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are encoded by three distinct genes (RXRα, RXRβ, and RXRγ) and bind selectively and with high affinity to the vitamin A derivative, 9-cis-retinoic acid. RXRs are type-II nuclear hormone receptors that are largely localized to the nuclear compartment independent of ligand binding. Nuclear RXRs form heterodimers with nuclear hormone receptor subfamily 1 proteins, including thyroid hormone receptor, retinoic acid receptors, vitamin D receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, liver X receptors, and farnesoid X receptor (1). Since RXRs heterodimerize with multiple nuclear hormone receptors, they play a central role in transcriptional control of numerous hormonal signaling pathways by binding to cis-acting response elements in the promoter/enhancer region of target genes (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The electroneutral cation-chloride-coupled co-transporter (SLC12) gene family comprises bumetanide-sensitive Na+/K+/Cl- (NKCC), thiazide-sensitive Na+/Cl-, and K+/Cl- (KCC) co-transporters. SLC12A1/NKCC2 and SLC12A2/NKCC1 regulate cell volume and maintain cellular homeostasis in response to osmotic and oxidative stress (1). The broadly expressed NKCC1 is thought to play roles in fluid secretion (i.e. salivary gland function), salt balance (i.e. maintenance of renin and aldosterone levels), and neuronal development and signaling (2-7). During neuronal development, NKCC1 and KCC2 maintain a fine balance between chloride influx (NKCC1) and efflux (KCC2), which regulates γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated neurotransmission (3). Increased NKCC1 expression in immature neurons maintains high intracellular chloride levels that result in inhibitory GABAergic signaling; KCC2 maintains low intracellular chloride levels and excitatory GABAergic responses in mature neurons (4,5,8). Deletion of NKCC1 impairs NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth in PC-12D cells while inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide inhibits re-growth of axotomized dorsal root ganglion cells (6,7). Defective chloride homeostasis in neurons is linked to seizure disorders that are ameliorated by butemanide treatment, indicating that abnormal NKCC1 and NKCC2 expression or signaling may play a role in neonatal and adult seizures (9-12). NKCC1 is found as a homodimer or within heterooligomers with other SLC12 family members. This transport protein associates with a number of oxidative- and osmotic-responsive kinases that bind, phosphorylate, and activate NKCC1 co-transporter activity (13-16). In response to decreased intracellular chloride concentrations, Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) phosphorylates NKCC1 to increase co-transporter activity and promote chloride influx (16-19). Oxidative stress response kinase 1 (OSR1) also phosphorylates and activates NKCC1 in response to oxidative stress (14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cytoplasmic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS1) catalyzes the first committed step of mevalonate pathway essential for cholesterol biosynthesis (1). HMGCS1 transcription is regulated by sterol levels (2). Studies showed that miR-223 reduces cholesterol biosynthesis by inhibiting HMGCS1 and methylsterol monooxygenase 1 (3). In addition, activation of the EGFR family member ERBB4 induces the expression of SREBP-regulated genes (including HMGCS1) involved in cholesterol biosynthesis, suggesting a role of this enzyme in the metabolic re-programming in ERBB4-driven cancers (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The mTORC1 kinase complex is a critical regulator of cell growth (1,2). Its activity is modulated by energy levels, growth factors, and amino acids via signaling through Akt, MAPK, and AMPK pathways (3,4). Recent studies found that the four related GTPases, RagA, RagB, RagC, and RagD, interact with raptor within the mTORC1 complex (1,2). These interactions are both necessary and sufficient for mTORC1 activation in response to amino acid signals (1,2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: When T cells encounter antigens via the T cell receptor (TCR), information about the quantity and quality of antigens is relayed to the intracellular signal transduction machinery (1). This activation process depends mainly on CD3 (Cluster of Differentiation 3), a multiunit protein complex that directly associates with the TCR. CD3 is composed of four polypeptides: ζ, γ, ε and δ. Each of these polypeptides contains at least one immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) (2). Engagement of TCR complex with foreign antigens induces tyrosine phosphorylation in the ITAM motifs and phosphorylated ITAMs function as docking sites for signaling molecules such as ZAP-70 and p85 subunit of PI-3 kinase (3,4). TCR ligation also induces a conformational change in CD3ε, such that a proline region is exposed and then associates with the adaptor protein Nck (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3, AML2), a member of the Runt family of transcription factors, plays an important role in the suppression of gastric epithelium cell proliferation (1), dorsal root ganglia neurogenesis (2), and T cell differentiation (3,4). RUNX3 is also involved in caspase-3-dependent apoptosis (5). Protein complexes containing RUNX3 and various transcription factors, such as Smads or β-catenin/TCF4, have tumor suppressor activity and regulate downstream target gene transcription (6,7). While typically localized to the nucleus, RUNX3 can be tyrosine phosphorylated and located in the cytoplasm of many cancer cells. This mislocalization of RUNX3 abolishes its tumor suppressor function and contributes to tumorigenesis (8). Research studies indicate that gene silencing or protein mislocalization inactivates RUNX3 in more than 80% of gastric cancers and other cancer types (1,9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) catalyzes the ligation of the fatty acid to CoA to form fatty acyl-CoA in a two-step reaction (1). Five isoforms of ACSL have been identified (1). These isoforms have different substrate preferences and subcellular localizations (1). Overexpression of ACSL1 results in changes to fatty acid metabolism in rat primary hepatocytes (2).

$448
50 sections
1 Kit
The PD-L1, FoxP3, CD8α Multiplex IHC Antibody Panel enables researchers to simultaneously detect these targets in paraffin-embedded tissues using tyramide signal amplification. Each antibody in the panel has been validated for this approach. For recommended staining conditions optimized specifically for this antibody panel please refer to Table 1 on the Data Sheet.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The field of cancer immunotherapy is focused on empowering the immune system to fight cancer. This approach has seen recent success in the clinic with targeting immune checkpoint control proteins, such as PD-1 (1,2). Despite this success, clinical biomarkers that predict response to therapeutic strategies involving PD-1 receptor blockade are still under investigation (3-5). While PD-L1 expression has been linked with an increased likelihood of response to anti-PD-1 therapy, research studies have shown that additional factors, such as tumor-immune infiltration and the ratio of effector to regulatory T cells within the tumor, could play a significant role in predicting treatment outcome (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: AMPA- (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid), kainate-, and NMDA- (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors are the three main families of ionotropic glutamate-gated ion channels. AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are comprised of four subunits (GluR 1-4), which assemble as homo- or hetero-tetramers to mediate the majority of fast excitatory transmissions in the central nervous system. AMPARs are implicated in synapse formation, stabilization, and plasticity (1). In contrast to GluR 2-containing AMPARs, AMPARs that lack GluR 2 are permeable to calcium (2). Post-transcriptional modifications (alternative splicing, nuclear RNA editing) and post-translational modifications (glycosylation, phosphorylation) result in a very large number of permutations, fine-tuning the kinetic properties of AMPARs. Research studies have implicated activity changes in AMPARs in a variety of diseases including Alzheimer’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), stroke, and epilepsy (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) proteins belong to a family of highly conserved transport proteins found as both soluble and membrane-bound forms (1). Although CLIC proteins have putative, selective chloride ion channel activity, they are structural homologs to members of the glutathione-S-transferase protein superfamily and are likewise regulated by redox status (2). CLIC proteins are distinct from other ion channels in that they are found as both soluble and integral membrane forms, and their form determines their function (3-6). Chloride intracellular channel proteins are ubiquitously expressed in numerous tissue types and are involved in diverse biological functions (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Kruppel-like factors (KLFs) are a family of zinc finger DNA-binding proteins that share homology to Kruppel transcription factor in Drosophila melanogaster (1). These transcription regulators play diverse roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, inflammation, and pluripotency (2). Various KLFs, including KLF5, are involved in cancer-related processes, such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), invasion, and metastasis (3-6). In addition, studies show that KLF5 deficiency specific to renal collecting duct epithelial cells impairs cardiac stress adaptation response coordinated by the heart and kidney (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a member of the MRP subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (1). MRP1/ABCC1 protein functions as an organic anion transporter. It has a broad range of substrates, including antineoplastic or therapeutic agents and the glutathione (GSH) conjugates of these compounds. MRP1/ABCC1 also transports physiological substrates such as folates, GSH and GSH disulfide (GSSG) conjugates of steroids, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins (2,3).Although MRP1/ABCC1 is generally expressed in normal tissue, upregulation of MRP1/ABCC1 has been found in a variety of solid tumors, including small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer (1,4,5). Research studies show that overexpression of MRP1/ABCC1 facilitates the elimination of therapeutic agents from cancer cells and confers drug resistance in those patients. Research studies also show that elevated expression of MRP1/ABCC1 is a negative prognostic marker for breast cancer and small cell lung cancer, as the level of MRP1/ABCC1 is predictive of the response and toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents in those patients (6-10).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Bcl-2 exerts a survival function in response to a wide range of apoptotic stimuli through inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome c release (1). It has been implicated in modulating mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and proton flux (2). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified within Bcl-2 including Thr56, Ser70, Thr74, and Ser87 (3). It has been suggested that these phosphorylation sites may be targets of the ASK1/MKK7/JNK1 pathway and that phosphorylation of Bcl-2 may be a marker for mitotic events (4,5). Mutation of Bcl-2 at Thr56 or Ser87 inhibits its anti-apoptotic activity during glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of T lymphocytes (6). Interleukin-3 and JNK-induced Bcl-2 phosphorylation at Ser70 may be required for its enhanced anti-apoptotic functions (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fumarate hydratase (Fumarase, FH) is canonically regarded as a mitochondrial enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid cycle that catalyzes fumarate to malate (1,2). Studies have demonstrated that deficiencies in FH can lead to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (1,3) or, in homozygous germline mutations, severe neurological and muscular disorders (1,2). There also exists a cytosolic fumarase isoenzyme that is involved in DNA damage repair (3).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated α-Tubulin (11H10) Rabbit mAb #2125.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MEK1 and MEK2, also called MAPK or Erk kinases, are dual-specificity protein kinases that function in a mitogen activated protein kinase cascade controlling cell growth and differentiation (1-3). Activation of MEK1 and MEK2 occurs through phosphorylation of two serine residues at positions 217 and 221, located in the activation loop of subdomain VIII, by Raf-like molecules. MEK1/2 is activated by a wide variety of growth factors and cytokines and also by membrane depolarization and calcium influx (1-4). Constitutively active forms of MEK1/2 are sufficient for the transformation of NIH/3T3 cells or the differentiation of PC-12 cells (4). MEK activates p44 and p42 MAP kinase by phosphorylating both threonine and tyrosine residues at sites located within the activation loop of kinase subdomain VIII.

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-PLCγ1 (Tyr783) (D6M9S) Rabbit mAb #14008.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ, and PLCε. Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulate the activity of PLC. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (2). PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783, and 1248 (3). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (4). PLCγ2 is engaged in antigen-dependent signaling in B cells and collagen-dependent signaling in platelets. Phosphorylation by Btk or Lck at Tyr753, 759, 1197, and 1217 is correlated with PLCγ2 activity (5,6).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Jak2 (D2E12) XP® Rabbit mAb #3230.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2) are activated by ligands binding to a number of associated cytokine receptors (1). Upon cytokine receptor activation, Jak proteins become autophosphorylated and phosphorylate their associated receptors to provide multiple binding sites for signaling proteins. These associated signaling proteins, such as Stats (2), Shc (3), insulin receptor substrates (4), and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (5), typically contain SH2 or other phospho-tyrosine-binding domains.