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Product listing: CD45 (D4H7K) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P06800 #72787 to JARID1C (D29B9) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P41229 #5361

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The protein phosphatase (PTP) receptor CD45 is a type I transmembrane protein comprised of a pair of intracellular tyrosine phosphatase domains and a variable extracellular domain generated by alternative splicing (1). The catalytic activity of CD45 is a function of the first phosphatase domain (D1) while the second phosphatase domain (D2) may interact with and stabilize the first domain, or recruit/bind substrates (2,3). CD45 interacts directly with antigen receptor complex proteins or activates Src family kinases involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell antigen receptor signaling (1). Specifically, CD45 dephosphorylates Src-family kinases Lck and Fyn at their conserved negative regulatory carboxy-terminal tyrosine residues and upregulates kinase activity. Conversely, studies indicate that CD45 can also inhibit Lck and Fyn by dephosphorylating their positive regulatory autophosphorylation site. CD45 appears to be both a positive and a negative regulator that conducts signals depending on specific stimuli and cell type (1). Human leukocytes including lymphocytes, eosinophils, monocytes, basophils, and neutrophils express CD45, while erythrocytes and platelets are negative for CD45 expression (4).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated LC3A/B (D3U4C) XP® Rabbit mAb #12741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation, but it has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegenerative diseases, infection, and cancer (3). Autophagy marker Light Chain 3 (LC3) was originally identified as a subunit of microtubule-associated proteins 1A and 1B (termed MAP1LC3) (4) and subsequently found to contain similarity to the yeast protein Apg8/Aut7/Cvt5 critical for autophagy (5). Three human LC3 isoforms (LC3A, LC3B, and LC3C) undergo post-translational modifications during autophagy (6-9). Cleavage of LC3 at the carboxy terminus immediately following synthesis yields the cytosolic LC3-I form. During autophagy, LC3-I is converted to LC3-II through lipidation by a ubiquitin-like system involving Atg7 and Atg3 that allows for LC3 to become associated with autophagic vesicles (6-10). The presence of LC3 in autophagosomes and the conversion of LC3 to the lower migrating form, LC3-II, have been used as indicators of autophagy (11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The c-Cbl proto-oncogene is a ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic adaptor protein that is especially predominant in hematopoietic cells (1,2). c-Cbl is rapidly tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to stimulation of a variety of cell-surface receptors and becomes associated with a number of intracellular signaling molecules such as protein tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, Crk, and 14-3-3 proteins (3,4). c-Cbl possesses a highly conserved amino-terminal phosphotyrosine binding domain (TKB) and a C3HC4 RING finger motif. The TKB recognizes phosphorylated tyrosines on activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) as well as other nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. The RING finger motif recruits ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. These two domains are primarily responsible for the ubiquitin ligase activity of c-Cbl and downregulation of RTKs (3). Research studies have indicated that in human cancer tissues, c-Cbl is frequently tyrosine-phosphorylated in a tumor-specific manner (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr731 of c-Cbl provides a docking site for downstream signaling components such as p85 and Fyn (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Erlin-1 and erlin-2 (SPFH1 and SPFH2) are SPFH domain-containing proteins that belong to the prohibitin family (1,2). The N-termal domain of erlin proteins contains ER-targeting sequences responsible for their translocation to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) (3). In the ER, erlin-1 and erlin-2 specifically associate with the detergent resistant lipid raft microdomain of the membrane (3). Erlin-1 may be involved in dentritic cell activation (4) and erlin-2 has been shown to regulate the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway by interacting with endogenous substrates and resulting in their polyubiquitination and degradation (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). The p300/CBP histone acetyltransferases acetylate multiple lysine residues in the amino terminal tail of histone H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20) at gene promoters during transcriptional activation (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the access of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites that facilitate recruitment of many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins that contain a bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Histone H2B is mono-ubiquitinated at Lys120 during transcriptional activation by the RAD6 E2 protein in conjunction with the BRE1A/BRE1B E3 ligase (also known as RNF20/RNF40) (7). Mono-ubiquitinated histone H2B Lys120 is associated with the transcribed region of active genes and stimulates transcriptional elongation by facilitating FACT-dependent chromatin remodeling (7-9). In addition, it is essential for subsequent methylation of histone H3 Lys4 and Lys79, two additional histone modifications that regulate transcriptional initiation and elongation (10). In response to metabolic stress, AMPK is recruited to responsive genes and phosphorylates histone H2B at Lys36, both at promoters and in transcribed regions of genes, and may regulate transcriptional elongation (11). In response to multiple apoptotic stimuli, histone H2B is phosphorylated at Ser14 by the Mst1 kinase (12). Upon induction of apoptosis, Mst1 is cleaved and activated by caspase-3, leading to global phosphorylation of histone H2B during chromatin condensation. Interestingly, histone H2B is rapidly phosphorylated at irradiation-induced DNA damage foci in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (13). In this case, phosphorylation at Ser14 is rapid, depends on prior phosphorylation of H2AX Ser139, and occurs in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that Ser14 phosphorylation may have distinct roles in DNA-damage repair and apoptosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs) belong to a family of zipcode-binding proteins (1,2). Three members of this family, IMP1, IMP2, and IMP3, have been identified (1,2). They contain two RNA recognition motifs, four K homology domains, and were found to function in mRNA localization, turnover, and translation control (1,2). Research studies have implicated these proteins in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as growth and development (3), testicular neoplasia (4), and melanocytic neoplasia (5).

The Phospho-Bad Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate the role of Bad protein in apoptosis. The kit contains primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blots with each antibody.

Background: Bad is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family that promotes cell death by displacing Bax from binding to Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL (1,2). Survival factors, such as IL-3, inhibit the apoptotic activity of Bad by activating intracellular signaling pathways that result in the phosphorylation of Bad at Ser112 and Ser136 (2). Phosphorylation at these sites promotes binding of Bad to 14-3-3 proteins to prevent an association between Bad with Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL (2). Akt phosphorylates Bad at Ser136 to promote cell survival (3,4). Bad is phosphorylated at Ser112 both in vivo and in vitro by p90RSK (5,6) and mitochondria-anchored PKA (7). Phosphorylation at Ser155 in the BH3 domain by PKA plays a critical role in blocking the dimerization of Bad and Bcl-xL (8-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is a platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) that catalyzes the formation of thymine and 2-deoxy-D-ribose-1-phosphate from thymidine and orthophosphate (1). This intracellular enzyme is capable of both promoting angiogenesis and inhibiting apoptosis. Thymidine phosphorylase catalytic activity is required for its angiogenic function (2,3). Increased expression of TP/PD-ECGF is seen in a wide variety of different solid tumors and inflammatory diseases and is often associated with poor prognosis (4,5). Alternatively, TP can activate fluorouracil derivative (DFUR) prodrugs and increase the antitumor activity of the related treatment (1,5). The use of thymidine phosphorylase as a cancer therapeutic target has been studied extensively, with emphasis on either inhibiting TP enzymatic activity or increasing enzyme induction with concomitant DFUR treatment (1,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Bcl-2 family consists of a number of evolutionarily conserved proteins containing Bcl-2 homology domains (BH) that regulate apoptosis through control of mitochondrial membrane permeability and release of cytochrome c (1-3). Four BH domains have been identified (BH1-4) that mediate protein interactions. The family can be separated into three groups based upon function and sequence homology: pro-survival members include Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, A1 and Bcl-w; pro-apoptotic proteins include Bax, Bak and Bok; and "BH3 only" proteins Bad, Bik, Bid, Puma, Bim, Bmf, Noxa and Hrk. Interactions between death-promoting and death-suppressing Bcl-2 family members has led to a rheostat model in which the ratio of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins controls cell fate (4). Thus, pro-survival members exert their behavior by binding to and antagonizing death-promoting members. In general, the "BH3-only members" can bind to and antagonize the pro-survival proteins leading to increased apoptosis (5). While some redundancy of this system likely exists, tissue specificity, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of many of these family members can account for distinct physiological roles.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neural precursor expressed, developmentally down-regulated protein 4 (NEDD4) was originally identified as a gene that is highly expressed in the early mouse embryonic central nervous system (1). Subsequently, a family of NEDD4-like proteins have been defined that includes seven members in humans (2). NEDD4 and NEDD4-like (NEDD4L) proteins contain multiple functional domains including a calcium-dependent phospholipid and membrane binding domain (C2 domain), two to four protein binding domains (WW domains), and an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase domain (HECT domain). NEDD4 and NEDD4L have been shown to downregulate both neuronal voltage-gated Na+ channels (NaVs) and epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs) in response to increased intracellular Na+ concentrations (3,4). The WW domains of NEDD4 bind to PY motifs (amino acid sequence PPXY) found in multiple NaV and ENaC proteins; ubiquitination of these proteins is mediated by the HECT domain of NEDD4 and results in their internalization and removal from the plasma membrane. Research studies have shown that mutation of the PY motifs in ENaC proteins is associated with Liddle's syndrome, an autosomal dominant form of hypertension (5). In addition to targeting sodium channels, NEDD4L has also been shown to negatively regulate TGF-β signaling by targeting Smad2 for degradation (6). Mouse and human NEDD4 are rapidly cleaved by caspase proteins during apoptosis, although the significance of this cleavage is not clear (7).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Rab11a, Rab11b, and Rab25 are members of the Rab11 subfamily of small Ras-like GTPases. Unlike universally expressed Rab11, typical Rab25 expression appears to be limited to gastrointestinal mucosa, kidney, and lung (1). Rab25 can associate with apical recycling vesicles to help regulate apical vesicle trafficking (2,3). Research studies indicate that atypical Rab25 expression can be associated with various forms of cancer. Increased Rab25 expression is associated with aggressive growth in ovarian and breast cancer, where Rab25 may inhibit apoptosis and promote cancer cell proliferation and invasion through regulation of vesicle transport and cellular motility (4-7). Interaction between Rab25 and β1 integrin promotes vesicle-mediated transport of integrin to pseudopodial tip membranes, fostering the persistent invasion of tumor cells (8). Conversely, the reported loss of Rab25 expression in a number of breast cancer cases has an unclear effect on cancer pathogenesis (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CaSR, the extracellular Calcium-Sensing Receptor, is a widely expressed G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in calcium homeostasis. CaSR operates as a sensor in parathyroid and kidney, and alterations in its activity have been shown to cause thyroid disease in humans (1). Activation of the receptor in response to extracellular calcium or other ligands causes activation of phospholipase C (PLC), release of IP3 and release of calcium from intracellular stores (2). Proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α increase CaSR gene expression in human thyroid and kidney cells through activation of the NF-κB pathway, and this pathway may be involved in hypocalcemia often seen in critically ill patients (3). Elevated calcium concentration and CaSR expression have been linked to proliferation and metastasis of skeletal metastatic prostate cancer cell lines (4). In intestinal epithelial cells, CaSR is involved in regulation of cyclic nucleotide metabolism and the fluid secretion that results in life-threatening fluid loss in response to intestinal pathogens (5). The interaction of CaSR with the actin-binding protein filamin may provide scaffolding for the organization of signaling pathways converging on the cytoskeleton, including CaSR-mediated MAPK pathway activation (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: KSR1 (kinase supressor of Ras) was identified from a genetic screen in Drosophila and C. elegans as a component of the Ras signaling pathway (1). KSR1 has a putative carboxy-terminal kinase domain that lacks a key Lys residue for phospho-group transfer. Although reports indicate that ceramide and EGF activate KSR1 (2,3), other evidence demonstrates that KSR1 regulates Raf in a kinase-independent manner (4,5). It is now widely accepted that KSR1 functions as a scaffold that binds MEK1/2 and 14-3-3 protein constitutively and binds ERK1/2 in a Ras activation-dependent manner (1,5,6). HSP70/HSP90 and p50 Cdc37 associate with the KSR1 complex to ensure its stability (5). Multiple phosphorylation sites have been identified: Ser297 and Ser392 mediate 14-3-3 binding, and putative MAPK phosphorylation sites include Thr260, Thr274 and Ser443 (6). C-TAK1 (Cdc25C-associated kinase 1) binds and phosphorylates KSR1 at Ser392 in quiescent cells (7). In response to stimuli, Ser392 is dephosphorylated by PP2A, which leads to ERK1/2 association and allows the KSR1 complex to translocate from cytosol to membrane, where the MAPK pathway is activated (8). IMP, a Ras-responsive E3 ubiquitin ligase, is also involved in interaction with KSR1 and may regulate its localization and stability (9). Very high expression levels of KSR1 inhibit MAPK signaling, whereas physiological levels promote MAPK signaling, indicating that the scaffold protein can turn signaling "on" or "off" depending on the scaffold concentration (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: The super elongation complex (SEC) plays a critical role in regulating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription elongation (1). The SEC is composed of AFF4, AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, and MLLT1/ENL proteins. The pathogenesis of mixed lineage leukemia is often associated with translocations of the SEC subunits joined to the histone H3 Lys4 methyltransferase mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene (1-4). The SEC has been found to contain RNAPII elongation factors eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukemia (ELL), ELL2, and ELL3, along with the associated factors EAF1 and EAF2, which can increase the catalytic rate of RNAPII transcription in vitro, (1,2,5-7). The SEC positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) phosphorylates the carboxy-terminal domain within the largest subunit of RNAP II at Ser2 of the heptapeptide repeat. The SEC negative transcription elongation factors, DRB-induced stimulating factor (DSIF) and negative elongation factor (NELF), signal the transition from transcription initiation and pausing to productive transcription elongation (2,8-10). The chromosomal translocation of MLL with the members of the SEC leads to SEC recruitment to MLL regulated genes, such as the highly developmentally regulated Hox genes, implicating the misregulation and overexpression of these genes as underlying contributors to leukemogenesis (1,2,9,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: GABAA receptor associated protein (GABARAP) is an Atg8 family protein with a key role in autophagy, which was originally discovered as a protein associated with the GABAA receptor regulating receptor trafficking to the plasma membrane (1). Proteins in this family, including microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) and GATE-16 (GABARAPL2), become incorporated into the autophagosomal membranes following autophagic stimuli such as starvation (2). Like the other family members, GABARAP is cleaved at its carboxyl terminus, which leads to conjugation by either of the phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylserine (3,4). This processing converts GABARAP from a type I to a type II membrane bound form involved in autophagosome biogenesis. Processing of GABARAP involves cleavage by Atg4 family members (5,6) followed by conjugation by the E1 and E2 like enzymes Atg7 and Atg3 (7,8). GABARAPL1/GEC1, a protein that is highly related to GABARAP, was identified as an estrogen inducible gene, and is also associated with autophagosomes (9-11).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. There are three evolutionarily conserved subunits of PA28: PA28α (PSME1), PA28β (PSME2), and PA28γ (PSME3) (1,2). PA28α and PA28β form a heteroheptameric complex and function by binding to the 20S complex at its opening site(s). The PA28α/β complex is present throughout the cell and participates in MHC class I antigen presentation by promoting the generation of antigenic peptides from foreign proteins (2). PA28γ exists in the form of a homoheptamer and is mainly located in the nucleus. The PA28γ complex exerts its function by binding and guiding specific nuclear target proteins to the 20S proteasome for further degradation (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Frizzled (Fzd) belongs to the seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily (1). Fzds have a large extracellular N-terminal region containing a cysteine-rich domain (CRD), which is involved in binding to Wnt proteins (1,2). The intracellular C-terminus binds to the PDZ domain of Dvl proteins, a major signaling component downstream of Fzd (3). Wnt proteins bind to Fzd and the co-receptors LRP5 or LPR6, and activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway through inhibiting phosphorylation of β-catenin by GSK3-β (4,5). In addition to this canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway, some Wnt proteins can also activate the Fzd/Ca2+ pathway and Fzd/PCP (planar cell polarity) pathway (6,7). The mammalian Fzd subfamily has 10 members (Fzd1 to Fzd10) and they may mediate signaling through different pathways (8). Some Fzds can also bind to other secreted proteins, like Norrin and R-Spondin (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ribosomal protein L26 (RPL26) is a component of the 60S ribosomal subunit and is involved in translation (1,2). It was shown that RPL26 increases the translation of p53 mRNA by binding to its 5' untranslated region (UTR) after DNA damage. Studies found that overexpression of RPL26 enhances the binding of p53 mRNA to the ribosomes and increases p53 translation. Overexpression of RPL26 also induces cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase and increases radiation-stimulated apoptosis (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD or 6PGD) catalyzes the conversion of 6-phosphogluconate and NADP+ to ribulose 5-phosphate and NADPH in the pentose phosphate pathway (1). Research studies show that knockdown of PGD results in the induction of senescence and inhibition of growth of lung cancer cells (2). Additional research suggests that PGD influences the migration of some cancer cells by regulating c-Met phosphorylation state (3). Furthermore, it was shown that the glycolytic enzyme PGAM1 substrate (3-phosphoglycerate) regulates the pentose phosphate pathway by deactivating PGD/6PGD (4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The proprotein convertases (PCs) are enzymes that activate precursor proteins through proteolytic cleavage within the secretory pathway. PCs comprise several enzymes that are basic amino acid-specific proteinases (furin, PC1/3, PC2, PC4, PACE4, PC5/6, and PC7), as well as nonbasic amino acid convertases (S1P and PC9) (1). PCs have a common structure that includes an N-terminal signal peptide for secretory pathway targeting; a pro-domain that is thought to act as an intramolecular chaperone; a catalytic domain containing the active site; a P-domain that contributes to the overall folding of the enzyme by regulating stability, calcium-, and pH-dependence; and a C-terminal domain that interacts with the membrane (2). PCs act in a tissue- and substrate-specific fashion to generate an array of bioactive peptides and proteins from precursors, both in the brain and the periphery (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) was initially identified as an enzyme that regulates glycogen synthesis in response to insulin (1). GSK-3 is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates and inactivates glycogen synthase. GSK-3 is a critical downstream element of the PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway whose activity can be inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation at Ser21 of GSK-3α and Ser9 of GSK-3β (2,3). GSK-3 has been implicated in the regulation of cell fate in Dictyostelium and is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway required for Drosophila, Xenopus, and mammalian development (4). GSK-3 has been shown to regulate cyclin D1 proteolysis and subcellular localization (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nemo-like kinase (NLK ) is a serine/threonine-protein kinase that regulates multiple signaling pathways, including Wnt/β-catenin, TGFβ, IL-6, and Notch (1-4). NLK contributes to cell proliferation, differentiation, cell fate determination during early embryogenesis and nervous system development in vertebrates (5-7). Recent studies showed that NLK is aberrantly expressed in various types of cancer where it regulates cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion and survival (8-11). NLK is localized predominantly in nucleus and at a lower level in cytoplasm(12). Homodimerization of NLK is required for its activation and nuclear localization. NLK is activated via intermolecular autophosphorylation at Thr286 (13). NLK interacts with and phosphorylates a number of transcription factors including FOXO1, FOXO4, MYB, NOTCH1 and TCF7L2/TCF4, and LEF-1/TCF (14-18). NLK also associates with E3 ubiquitin ligase NARF and Raptor and regulates their function (19,20).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The protein inhibitor of activated Stat (PIAS) proteins, which include PIAS1, PIAS3, PIASx, and PIASy, were originally characterized based on their interaction with the Stat family of transcription factors (1,2). PIAS1, PIAS3, and PIASx interact with and repress Stat1, Stat3, and Stat4, respectively (1-3). Deletion of PIAS1 leads to inhibition of interferon-inducible genes and increased protection against infection (4). The PIAS family contains a conserved RING domain that has been linked to a function as a small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) ligase, coupling the SUMO conjugating enzyme Ubc9 with its substrate proteins (5,6). Numerous studies have now shown that PIAS family members can regulate the activity of transcription factors through distinct mechanisms, including NF-κB (7,8), c-Jun, p53 (5,9), Oct-4 (10), and Smads (11,12). The activity of PIAS1 is regulated by both phosphorylation and arginine methylation. Inflammatory stimuli can induce IKK-mediated phosphorylation of PIAS1 at Ser90, which is required for its activity (13). In addition, PRMT1 induces arginine methylation of PIAS1 at Arg303 following interferon treatment and is associated with its repressive activity on Stat1 (14).

Each control slide contains formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded HeLa cells, untreated, treated with Human Interferon-α1 (hIFN-α1) #8927 that serve as a control for Phospho-Stat1 (Tyr701) and Phospho-Stat3 (Tyr705) immunostaining. Western blot analysis was performed on extracts derived from the same cells to verify the efficacy of the hIFN-α1 treatment.
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cytoplasmic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS1) catalyzes the first committed step of mevalonate pathway essential for cholesterol biosynthesis (1). HMGCS1 transcription is regulated by sterol levels (2). Studies showed that miR-223 reduces cholesterol biosynthesis by inhibiting HMGCS1 and methylsterol monooxygenase 1 (3). In addition, activation of the EGFR family member ERBB4 induces the expression of SREBP-regulated genes (including HMGCS1) involved in cholesterol biosynthesis, suggesting a role of this enzyme in the metabolic re-programming in ERBB4-driven cancers (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant for formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The JARID (Jumonji/AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein) family contains four members: JARID1A (also RBP2 and RBBP2), JARID1B (also PLU-1), JARID1C (also SMCX) and JARID1D (also SMCY) (4). In addition to the JmJC domain, these proteins contain JmJN, BRIGHT, C5HC2 zinc-finger, and PHD domains, the latter of which binds to methylated histone H3 (Lys9) (4). All four JARID proteins demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys4; JARID1B also demethylates mono-methyl histone H3 Lys4 (5-7). JARID1A is a critical RB-interacting protein and is required for Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional repression during ES cell differentiation (8). A JARID1A-NUP98 gene fusion is associated with myeloid leukemia (9). JARID1B, which interacts with many proteins including c-Myc and HDAC4, may play a role in cell fate decisions by blocking terminal differentiation (10-12). JARID1B is over-expressed in many breast cancers and may act by repressing multiple tumor suppressor genes including BRCA1 and HOXA5 (13,14). JARID1C has been found in a complex with HDAC1, HDAC2, G9a and REST, which binds to and represses REST target genes in non-neuronal cells (7). JARID1C mutations are associated with X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy (15,16). JARID1D is largely uncharacterized.