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Product listing: eIF3C Antibody, UniProt ID Q99613 #2068 to γ-Tubulin Antibody, UniProt ID P23258 #5886

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Translation initiation requires a set of factors to facilitate the association of the 40S ribosomal subunit with mRNA. The eIF4F complex, consisting of eIF4E, eIF4A, and eIF4G, binds to the 5' cap structure of mRNA. eIF4F and eIF4B unwind the secondary structure of mRNA at its 5' untranslated region. The 40S ribosomal subunit, along with some initiation factors including eIF3, then binds to the 5' mRNA cap and searches along the mRNA for the initiation codon. eIF3 is a large translation initiation complex with 10 to 13 different subunits. eIF3A, eIF3B, eIF3C, eIF3E, eIF3F, and eIF3H are the core subunits critical for the function of this complex. eIF3 physically interacts with eIF4G, which may be responsible for the association of the 40S ribosomal subunit with mRNA (1). eIF3 also stabilizes the binding of Met-tRNAf.eIF2.GTP to the 40S ribosomal subunit and helps keep the integrity of the resulting complex upon addition of the 60S ribosomal subunit (2). Studies have shown that mTOR interacts with eIF3 directly (3,4). When cells are stimulated by hormones or mitogenic signals, mTOR binds to the eIF3 complex and phosphorylates S6K1 (3). This process results in the dissociation of S6K1 from eIF3 and S6K1 activation. The activated S6K1 then phosphorylates its downstream targets including ribosomal protein S6 and eIF4B, resulting in stimulation of translation. Further findings demonstrated that activated mTOR signaling induces the association of eIF3 with eIF4G upon stimulation with insulin (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Eph receptors are the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). They can be divided into two groups based on sequence similarity and on their preference for a subset of ligands: EphA receptors bind to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ephrin A ligand; EphB receptors bind to ephrin B proteins that have a transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain (1,2). Research studies have shown that Eph receptors and ligands may be involved in many diseases including cancer (3). Both ephrin A and B ligands have dual functions. As RTK ligands, ephrins stimulate the kinase activity of Eph receptors and activate signaling pathways in receptor-expressing cells. The ephrin extracellular domain is sufficient for this function as long as it is clustered (4). The second function of ephrins has been described as "reverse signaling", whereby the cytoplasmic domain becomes tyrosine phosphorylated, allowing interactions with other proteins that may activate signaling pathways in the ligand-expressing cells (5). Various stimuli can induce tyrosine phosphorylation of ephrin B, including binding to EphB receptors, activation of Src kinase, and stimulation by PDGF and FGF (6). Tyr324 and Tyr327 have been identified as major phosphorylation sites of ephrin B1 in vivo (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TFIIB (also known as GTF2B, TF2B and general transcription factor IIB) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor that plays a central role in the assembly of the transcription pre-initiation complex through direct recruitment of RNA polymerase II (1,2). TFIIB functions as a bridge between promoter-bound TFIID and RNA polymerase II. In addition to interacting with promoter-bound TFIID and TFIIA, TFIIB makes extensive contacts with the core promoter via two independent DNA-binding modules. TFIIB may also be a target of transcriptional activator proteins that act to stimulate pre-initiation complex assembly.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the SALL gene family encode putative zinc finger transcription factors highly expressed during development (1). Sall4 is expressed very early in development with other pluripotency regulators, such as Oct-4 and Nanog (2). Recent studies suggest Sall4 works as a master regulator that controls its own expression and the expression of Oct-4 in a transcriptional regulation feedback loop governing stem cell pluripotency and stem cell fate (2,3). Immunohistochemical studies indicate that Sall4 is a sensitive and specific diagnostic marker for primary germ cell tumors and yolk sac tumors (4,5). Research studies have shown that Sall4 is constitutively expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is a probable effector of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in this disease (6). In addition, mutations in Sall4 have been implicated in human malformation syndromes including Duane-radial ray syndrome (Okihiro syndrome) and Acro-renal-ocular syndrome (7).

$305
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescence of human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-S6 Ribosomal Protein (Ser235/236) (D57.2.2E) XP® Rabbit mAb #4858.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, S. cerevisiae

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: One way that growth factors and mitogens effectively promote sustained cell growth and proliferation is by upregulating mRNA translation (1,2). Growth factors and mitogens induce the activation of p70 S6 kinase and the subsequent phosphorylation of the S6 ribosomal protein. Phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein correlates with an increase in translation of mRNA transcripts that contain an oligopyrimidine tract in their 5' untranslated regions (2). These particular mRNA transcripts (5'TOP) encode proteins involved in cell cycle progression, as well as ribosomal proteins and elongation factors necessary for translation (2,3). Important S6 ribosomal protein phosphorylation sites include several residues (Ser235, Ser236, Ser240, and Ser244) located within a small, carboxy-terminal region of the S6 protein (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ron is a member of the Met protooncogene family of receptor tyrosine kinases, which also includes Stk, c-Met, and c-Sea. The functional Ron is a heterodimer composed of a 40 kDa α chain and a 150 kDa β chain. Ron is initially synthesized in the cells as a single-chain, pro-Ron precursor that is cleaved into the two active chains. The α chain is completely extracellular, whereas the β chain traverses the cell membrane and contains the intracellular tyrosine kinase and regulatory elements (1,2). Ron mediates multiple signaling cascades that involve cell motility, adhesion, proliferation, and apoptosis. The signaling pathways activated downstream of Ron include the ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathways. Ron activation can also significantly increase c-Src activity, a signaling intermediate involved in cell cycle progression, motility, angiogenesis and survival (3,4). The function of Ron has been shown to be important for embryological development as well as implicated in the progression and metastasis of tumors (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Signal Transducing Adaptor Molecule 1 (STAM1) is a ubiquitously expressed adaptor protein containing an SH3 domain and an ITAM motif. Initial research studies demonstrated that STAM1 undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation following treatment with numerous cytokines and growth factors (1). Subsequent research studies identified STAM1 as a component of the ESCRT-0 complex, which mediates the endocytic sorting of ubiquitinated membrane proteins to the lysosomal compartment for degradation (2). STAM1 harbors a tandemly-oriented VHS (Vps27/Hrs/STAM) domain and UIM (ubiquitin-interacting motif) that facilitates STAM1 binding to ubiquitinated cargo proteins within the endosomal compartment (3,4). Gene targeting studies have revealed that STAM1 and STAM2 cooperate to promote thymic T-cell development and survival (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DYRK family includes several dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and regulated kinases capable of phosphorylating proteins at both Tyr and Ser/Thr residues (1). The DYRK family was identified based on homology to the yeast Yak1 (2) and the Drosophila minibrain (mnb) kinases (3). Seven mammalian isoforms have been discovered, including DYRK1A, DYRK1B, DYRK1C, DYRK2, DYRK3, DYRK4, and DYRK4B. Differences in substrate specificity, expression, and subcellular localization are seen across the DYRK family (4,5). All DYRK proteins have a Tyr-X-Tyr motif in the catalytic domain activation loop; phosphorylation of the second Tyr residue (e.g. Tyr312 of DYRK1A) is necessary for kinase activity. DYRKs typically autophosphorylate the Tyr residue within their activation loop, but phosphorylate substrates at Ser and Thr residues (1,6).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-GSK-3β (Ser9) (D85E12) XP® Rabbit mAb #5558.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) was initially identified as an enzyme that regulates glycogen synthesis in response to insulin (1). GSK-3 is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates and inactivates glycogen synthase. GSK-3 is a critical downstream element of the PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway whose activity can be inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation at Ser21 of GSK-3α and Ser9 of GSK-3β (2,3). GSK-3 has been implicated in the regulation of cell fate in Dictyostelium and is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway required for Drosophila, Xenopus, and mammalian development (4). GSK-3 has been shown to regulate cyclin D1 proteolysis and subcellular localization (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: A total of fifteen mammalian DNA polymerase enzymes catalyze the synthesis of nascent DNA during DNA replication and repair (1). DNA polymerase eta (POL η, POLH, Rad30) is one of a specialized type of DNA polymerases that function in DNA repair and translesion synthesis (TLS). POLH can accommodate and read through bulky DNA lesions such as pyrimidine dimers, which allows for continued DNA synthesis past lesions and limited stalling of replication forks (2,3). Damage inducing conditions, such as exposure to UV light or cisplatin, recruit POLH to sites of bulky DNA lesions where the polymerase interacts with PCNA (4,5). Mutations in the human POLH gene can result in a form of xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to light and susceptibility to skin cancer (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tyrosine-protein phosphatase non-receptor type-14 (PTPN14, Pez, PTPD2 and PTP36) is an evolutionarily conserved non-membrane tyrosine phosphatase with homology to the band 4.1 family of proteins (1-3). The PTPN14 protein contains an amino-terminal FERM (4.1-ezrin-radixin-moesin) domain, which suggests plasma membrane localization of the protein, and a carboxy-terminal protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain (4). Research studies have identified possible roles for PTPN14 in multiple, diverse signaling pathways, including cell growth and proliferation, cell migration and adhesion, and development. The PTPN14 phosphatase regulates the subcellular localization of YAP in a cell density-dependent manner, indicating a role for PTPN14 in the Hippo signaling pathway (5). The Drosophila PTPN14 homolog Pez localizes to adherens junctions, where it may regulate cell motility through dephosphorylation of β-catenin (3). PTPN14 may play a role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition through effects on the TGF-β signaling pathway (6), and interacts with VEGFR3, a receptor tyrosine kinase involved in lymphangiogenesis (7). Loss-of-function mutations in the PTPN14 gene are associated with colorectal cancer (8), and choanal atresia and lymphedema, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by defects in both nasal passage development and lymphangiogenesis (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Podoplanin (aggrus, glycoprotein 36) is a single-pass transmembrane protein belonging to the type-1 family of sialomucin-like glycoproteins. Podoplanin was first described in the rat as a surface glycoprotein that regulated podocyte morphology (1). It is now commonly used as a marker of lymphatic endothelial cells, where its expression is associated with the process of lymphangiogenesis (2). Its role in this regard is presumably due to its putative involvement in regulating actin cytoskeleton dynamics (3). Research studies have shown that podoplanin expression is upregulated in a number of tumor types including colorectal cancers (4), oral squamous cell carcinomas (5), and germ cell tumors (6), with higher expression levels often associated with more aggressive tumors (7). Research studies have suggested a functional role for podoplanin in the stromal microenvironment of tumors. For example, it has been reported that podoplanin expression in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) is positively associated with a stromal environment that promotes cancer progression (8,9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

The IRAK Isoform Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to examine total protein levels of the four Interleukin-1 Receptor Associated Kinase family members: IRAK1, IRAK2, IRAK3/IRAK-M, and IRAK4.

Background: Interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) is a serine/threonine-specific kinase that can be coprecipitated in an IL-1-inducible manner with the IL-1 receptor (1). The mammalian family of IRAK molecules contains four members (IRAK1, IRAK2, IRAK3/IRAK-M, and IRAK4). The binding of IL-1 to IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) initiates the formation of a complex that includes IL-1RI, AcP, MyD88, and IRAKs (2). IRAK undergoes autophosphorylation shortly after IL-1 stimulation. The subsequent events involve IRAK dissociation from the IL-1RI complex, its ubiquitination, and its association with two membrane-bound proteins: TAB2 and TRAF6. The resulting IRAK-TRAF6-TAB2 complex is then released into the cytoplasm where it activates protein kinase cascades, including TAK1, IKKs, and the stress-activated kinases (3).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated ALDH1A1 (D9Q8E) XP® Rabbit mAb #54135.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The aldehyde dehydrogenase family is a large group of enzymes that oxidize aldehydes formed through metabolic processes to their carboxylic acids (1). ALDH1A1 is a liver cytosolic isoform of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and is involved in the major pathway of alcohol metabolism along with alcohol dehydrogenase (2). ALDH1A1 is also known as retinal dehydrogenase 1 and is involved in retinol metabolism, converting retinol to retinoic acid (3). Recent studies suggest that control of retinoid signaling through ALDH1A1 may influence hematopoietic stem cell differentiation (4). There has been recent interest in ALDH1 isoforms as predictive biomarkers in disease. Several studies have suggested that ALDH1A1 is a potential marker for cancer stem cells and chemoresistance in several tumor types, such as melanoma (5), lung cancer (6), and glioblastoma (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SS18 is a protein that has been shown to be a part of the SWI/SNF complex (1, 2). The SS18-SSX fusion proteins are a result of in-frame fusions that fuse the SS18 gene on chromosome 18 with X chromosome genes SSX1, SSX2, and to a lesser extent SSX4 (3). Human synovial sarcoma (SS) accounts for 8-10% of all soft tissue malignancies and 95% of these malignancies express the recurrent translocation of the SS18 gene on chromosome 18 (3). The N-terminal SNH domain (SYT N-terminal homology domain) of the SS18 protein interacts with SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes via the N terminal region of BRM and BRG1 subunits (4). Studies of the SS18-SSX fusion in SS suggest that endogenous SS18 competes with the mutant SS18-SSX fusion for occupancy in the SWI/SNF complexes resulting in the displacement of SNF5 (BAF47) subunit. Displacement of the SNF5 subunit results in altered function of the SWI/SNF complex that leads to deregulated expression of genes such as Sox2 in SS (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Wolfram syndrome protein (WFS1) is an 890 amino acid protein that contains a cytoplasmic N-terminal domain, followed by nine-transmembrane domains and a luminal C-terminal domain. WFS1 is predominantly localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) (1) and its expression is induced in response to ER stress, partially through transcriptional activation (2,3). Research studies have shown that mutations in the WFS1 gene lead to Wolfram syndrome, an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder defined by young-onset, non-immune, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and progressive optic atrophy (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Troponin, working in conjunction with tropomyosin, functions as a molecular switch that regulates muscle contraction in response to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Troponin consists of three subunits: the Ca2+-binding subunit troponin C (TnC), the tropomyosin-binding subunit troponin T (TnT), and the inhibitory subunit troponin I (TnI) (1). In response to β-adrenergic stimulation of the heart, Ser23 and Ser24 of TnI (cardiac) are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. This phosphorylation stimulates a conformational change of the regulatory domain of TnC, reduces the association between TnI and TnC, and decreases myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by reducing the Ca2+ binding affinity of TnC (1-3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1; also known as AOF2 and BHC110) is a nuclear amine oxidase homolog that acts as a histone demethylase and transcription cofactor (1). Gene activation and repression is specifically regulated by the methylation state of distinct histone protein lysine residues. For example, methylation of histone H3 at Lys4 facilitates transcriptional activation by coordinating the recruitment of BPTF, a component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex, and WDR5, a component of multiple histone methyltransferase complexes (2,3). In contrast, methylation of histone H3 at Lys9 facilitates transcriptional repression by recruiting HP1 (4,5). LSD1 is a component of the CoREST transcriptional co-repressor complex that also contains CoREST, CtBP, HDAC1 and HDAC2. As part of this complex, LSD1 demethylates mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys4 through a FAD-dependent oxidation reaction to facilitate neuronal-specific gene repression in non-neuronal cells (1,6,7). In contrast, LSD1 associates with androgen receptor in human prostate cells to demethylate mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and facilitate androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation (8). Therefore, depending on gene context LSD1 can function as either a transcriptional co-repressor or co-activator. LSD1 activity is inhibited by the amine oxidase inhibitors pargyline, deprenyl, clorgyline and tranylcypromine (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: LKB1 (STK11) is a serine/threonine kinase and tumor suppressor that helps control cell structure, apoptosis and energy homeostasis through regulation of numerous downstream kinases (1,2). A cytosolic protein complex comprised of LKB1, putative kinase STRAD, and the MO25 scaffold protein, activates both AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and several AMPK-related kinases (3). AMPK plays a predominant role as the master regulator of cellular energy homeostasis, controlling downstream effectors that regulate cell growth and apoptosis in response to cellular ATP concentrations (4). LKB1 appears to be phosphorylated in cells at several sites, including human LKB1 at Ser31/325/428 and Thr189/336/363 (5).Mutation in the corresponding LKB1 gene causes Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by benign GI tract polyps and dark skin lesions of the mouth, hands, and feet (6). A variety of other LKB1 gene mutations have been associated with the formation of sporadic cancers in several tissues (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: CAD is essential for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides and possesses the following enzymatic activities: glutamine amidotransferase, carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase. Thus, the enzyme converts glutamine to uridine monophosphate, a common precursor of all pyrimidine bases, and it is necessary for nucleic acid synthesis (1). In resting cells, CAD is localized mainly in the cytoplasm where it carries out pyrimidine synthesis. As proliferating cells enter S phase, MAP Kinase (Erk1/2) phosphorlyates CAD at Thr456, resulting in CAD translocation to the nucleus. As cells exit S phase, CAD is dephosphorylated at Thr456 and phosphorylated at Ser1406 by PKA, returning the pathway to basal activity (2). Various research studies have shown increased expression of CAD in several types of cancer, prompting the development of pharmacological inhibitors such as PALA. Further studies have identified CAD as a potential predictive early marker of prostate cancer relapse (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The ADAM (A Disintegrin and A Metalloprotease) family of multidomain membrane proteins influences cell signaling and adhesion by shedding cell surface proteins such as cytokines and growth factors, by influencing cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM), and by directly remodeling the ECM. Conserved domains in ADAM family members include a prodomain, a zinc-dependent metalloprotease domain, a disintegrin domain, a cysteine-rich domain, an EGF-like sequence, and a short cytoplasmic tail (1,2).The prodomain is thought to aid in protein folding. Disintegrin and cysteine-rich domains mediate adhesion, at least in part, through binding to integrins. Phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic tail as well as its interaction with other signaling proteins may influence intra- and extracellular signaling (1). ADAM9 is widely distributed and has been shown to affect migration in skin keratinocytes (3,4). Research studies have shown that ADAM9 is overexpressed in prostate cancer (5), pancreatic cancer (6), gastric cancer (7), and has been linked to invasion and metastasis in small cell lung cancer (8). Research has also shown that an alternatively spliced short (50 kDa) form of ADAM9 containing protease activity is involved in tumor cell invasion (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cullin-associated and neddylation-dissociated (CAND1)/TIP120A is a protein containing multiple HEAT repeats. It functions, in part, as an inhibitor of multiple cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) via binding to cullin-RBX complexes that are both unconjugated to NEDD8 and lack association with substrate recognition subunits (1-3). Indeed, CAND1 has been shown to bind all cullin family members in human cells and analysis of the crystal structure of human CAND1 bound to the CUL1-RBX1 complex suggests that CAND1 inhibits the activity of CRLs by sterically blocking both the substrate recognition subunit binding site and the NEDD8 conjugation site (1,3,4). Conversely, CAND1 binding to cullin-RBX complexes is incompatible with neddylation as NEDD8 conjugated to cullins blocks CAND1 binding, suggesting that CAND1 binds to cullins only after the COP9 signalosome has catalyzed cullin deneddylation. Through its ability to negatively regulate CRL assembly, CAND1 plays an integral part in facilitating CRL activation cycles that allow CRLs to utilize distinct substrate recognition subunits and protects these subunits from undergoing ubiquitin-dependent degradation (5-7).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Transforming acid coiled-coil (TACC) proteins are a family of proteins characterized by a common coiled-coil motif of approximately 200 amino acids at the carboxy-terminal end (1). Three family members have been identified in humans: TACC1, TACC2, and TACC3. These proteins are thought to be involved in centrosomal microtubule assembly and have been mapped to chromosomal regions that are disrupted in some cancers (reviewed in 2). TACC3 has been shown to be upregulated in many cancer cell lines (3). When phosphorylated at Ser558 by Aurora A, mammalian TACC3 is localized to mitotic spindles and increases microtubule stability (4,5). For this reason, it has been suggested that monitoring the localization of phosphorylated TACC3 would be an effective way to determine the efficacy of Aurora A inhibitors that show promise as anti-cancer drugs (6,7). In addition, studies have shown that TACC3 could be useful as a prognostic marker for non-small cell lung cancer (8).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of serotonin (1) by converting tryptophan to 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (2). Two isoforms of TPH exist: TPH-1 is mainly expressed in the periphery, whereas the expression of TPH-2 is restricted to neuronal cells and the central nervous system (3). Most of the serotonin found throughout the body is synthesized by TPH-1 in enterochromaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Targeted disruption of the tph1 gene results in low levels of circulating and tissue serotonin (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Antiviral innate immunity depends on the combination of parallel pathways triggered by virus detecting proteins in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family and RNA helicases, such as Rig-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) and MDA-5 (melanoma differentiation-associated antigen 5), which promote the transcription of type I interferons (IFN) and antiviral enzymes (1-3). TLRs and helicase proteins contain sites that recognize the molecular patterns of different virus types, including DNA, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and glycoproteins. These antiviral proteins are found in different cell compartments; TLRs (i.e. TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9) are expressed on endosomal membranes and helicases are localized to the cytoplasm. Rig-I expression is induced by retinoic acid, LPS, IFN, and viral infection (4,5). Both Rig-I and MDA-5 share a DExD/H-box helicase domain that detects viral dsRNA and two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARD) that are required for triggering downstream signaling (4-7). Rig-I binds both dsRNA and viral ssRNA that contains a 5'-triphosphate end not seen in host RNA (8,9). Though structurally related, Rig-I and MDA-5 detect a distinct set of viruses (10,11). The CARD domain of the helicases, which is sufficient to generate signaling and IFN production, is recruited to the CARD domain of the MAVS/VISA/Cardif/IPS-1 mitochondrial protein, which triggers activation of NF-κB, TBK1/IKKε, and IRF-3/IRF-7 (12-15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. As a critical part of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC), the third member of the tubulin superfamily, γ-tubulin, is required for microtubule nucleation as well as centrosome duplication and spindle assembly (1,2, reviewed in 3). γ-tubulin forms complexes of two different sizes: γ-tubulin small complex (γ-TuSC) and the larger γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC). Each complex consists of a number of γ-tubulin complex proteins (GCPs) with γ-tubulin itself being considered GCP1. GCP2-6 all share sequence similarity in 5 different regions and it is thought that these areas could play a role in the proper folding of the proteins (4). γ-TuSC is composed of two γ-tubulin molecules as well as GCP2 and GCP3. γ-TuRC is made up of a ring of multiple copies of γ-TuSC in addition to GCP4, 5, and 6. Another protein, GCP-WD/NEDD1, which lacks sequence similarity with the other GCPs, associates with the γ-TuRC. GCP-WD/NEDD1 has been shown to regulate localization of the γ-TuSC to spindles and centrosomes (5-8). In mammals, phosphorylation of γ-tubulin at Ser131 by SADB controls the activity of the γ-TuRC. The hypothesis is that this phosphorylation stabilizes the protein in a conformation that stimulates centrosome amplification (9).