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Product listing: Doublecortin (A8L1U) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID O43602 #14802 to STAG2 Antibody, UniProt ID Q8N3U4 #4239

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Mutations in Doublecortin cause Lissencephaly (smooth brain), a neuronal migration disorder characterized by epilepsy and mental retardation (1). Doublecortin is a microtubule associated protein that stabilizes and bundles microtubules. A conserved doublecortin domain mediates the interaction with microtubules, and interestingly most missense mutations cluster in this domain (2). Kinases JNK, CDK5 and PKA phosphorylate doublecortin. JNK phosphorylates Thr321, Thr331 and Ser334 while PKA phosphorylates Ser47 and CDK5 phosphorylates Ser297 (3-5). Phosphorylation of Ser297 lowers the affinity of doublecortin to microtubules. Furthermore, mutations of Ser297 result in migration defects (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B2 (HMGB2) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but it is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 and HMGB2 facilitate the binding of Hox proteins, Oct proteins, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). Furthermore, HMGB2 interacts with RAG1 to facilitate RAG complex binding to the recombinant signal sequence (RSS) and stimulate DNA-bending and subsequent VDJ cleavage at antigen receptor genes (5,6). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation. HMGB2 is secreted by myeloid cells and promotes proliferation and migration of endothelial cells by binding to the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) (7). Research studies have shown that HMGB2 overexpression in hepatocellular carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis and shorter survival time (8).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Total HER2/ErbB2 Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of HER2/ErbB2 protein. A HER2/ErbB2 mouse antibody has been coated on the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, HER2/ErbB2 protein (phospho and nonphospho) is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a HER2/ErbB2 rabbit antibody is added to detect captured HER2/ErbB2 protein. Anti-rabbit IgG, HRP-linked antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of the absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of HER2/ErbB2 protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The ErbB2 (HER2) proto-oncogene encodes a 185 kDa transmembrane, receptor-like glycoprotein with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity (1). While ErbB2 lacks an identified ligand, ErbB2 kinase activity can be activated in the absence of a ligand when overexpressed and through heteromeric associations with other ErbB family members (2). Amplification of the ErbB2 gene and overexpression of its product are detected in almost 40% of human breast cancers (3). Binding of the c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase to ErbB2 at Tyr1112 leads to ErbB2 poly-ubiquitination and enhances degradation of this kinase (4). ErbB2 is a key therapeutic target in the treatment of breast cancer and other carcinomas and targeting the regulation of ErbB2 degradation by the c-Cbl-regulated proteolytic pathway is one potential therapeutic strategy. Phosphorylation of the kinase domain residue Tyr877 of ErbB2 (homologous to Tyr416 of pp60c-Src) may be involved in regulating ErbB2 biological activity. The major autophosphorylation sites in ErbB2 are Tyr1248 and Tyr1221/1222; phosphorylation of these sites couples ErbB2 to the Ras-Raf-MAP kinase signal transduction pathway (1,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Retinoblastoma-associated proteins 46 and 48 (RBAP46 and RBAP48; also known as RBBP7 and RBBP4) were first characterized in human cells as proteins that bind to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein (1). Since then, these proteins have been shown to be components of many protein complexes involved in chromatin regulation, including the chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) complex and type B histone acetyltransferase complex HAT1, both of which function in chromatin assembly during DNA replication (2,3). RBAP46 and RBAP48 are also found in the nucleosome remodeling factor complex NURF, the nucleosome remodeling and histone de-acetylation complex NuRD, and the Sin3/HDAC histone de-acetylation complex (4-7). More recently, RBAP46 and RBAP48 were identified as components of the polycomb repressor complex PRC2, which also contains EED and Ezh2 (8). RBAP46 and RBAP48 bind to the histone fold region of histone H4 and are believed to target these chromatin remodeling, histone acetylation, and histone de-acetylation complexes to their histone substrates (3).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Upf1 was identified as an active component in nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), an mRNA surveillance mechanism in eukaryotic cells that degrades mRNAs containing premature termination codons (1). Upf1 was found to be an ATP-dependent RNA helicase in the cytoplasm (2) and was later shown to be a component of cytoplasmic P-bodies (3). Upf1 phosphorylation mediates the repression of translation that accompanies NMD, allowing mRNA accessibility to the NMD machinery (4). Two other active components of NMD, Upf2 and Upf3, were also identified and described as having perinuclear and nucleocytoplasmic localization, respectively (5).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is an important factor in the repair of double-stranded breaks in DNA. Cells lacking DNA-PK or in which DNA-PK is inhibited fail to show proper nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (1-7). DNA-PK is composed of two DNA-binding subunits (Ku70 and Ku86) and one 450 kDa catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) (8). It is thought that a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku86 binds to double-stranded DNA broken ends before DNA-PKcs binds and is activated (1,9). Activated DNA-PKcs is a serine/threonine kinase that has been shown to phosphorylate a number of proteins in vitro, including p53, transcription factors, RNA polymerase, and Ku70/Ku86 (10,11). DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation at multiple sites, including Thr2609 and Ser2056, results in an inactivation of DNA-PK kinase activity and NHEJ ability (12,13). It has been demonstrated, however, that DNA-PK preferentially phosphorylates substrates before it autophosphorylates, suggesting that DNA-PK autophosphorylation may play a role in disassembly of the DNA repair machinery (14,15). Autophosphorylation at Thr2609 has also been shown to be required for DNA-PK-mediated double strand break repair, and phosphorylated DNA-PK co-localizes with H2A.X and 53BP1 at sites of DNA damage (16). Phosphorylation at Ser2056 occurs in response to double-stranded DNA breaks and ATM activation (17).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Total Smad3 Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that recognizes endogenous levels of Smad3 protein. A Smad3 Rabbit Antibody has been coated on the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, Smad3 proteins (phospho and nonphospho) are captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a Smad3 Mouse Detection Antibody is added to detect captured Smad3 proteins. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate TMB is added to develop color. The magnitude of the absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of Smad3 proteins.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human, Mink, Mouse

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmit TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, and 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved carboxy terminal SSXS motif. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad (Smad4), allowing translocation of the complex to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
CST's PathScan® Cleaved PARP (Asp214) Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of cleaved PARP (Asp214) protein. A cleaved PARP (Asp214) Rabbit mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, cleaved PARP (Asp214) protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a biotinylated PARP Rabbit mAb is added to detect the captured cleaved PARP protein. HRP-linked Streptavidin is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of the absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of cleaved PARP (Asp214) protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Casein Kinase I (CK1 or CKI) is the name given to a family of kinases consisting of multiple isoforms (α, α', β, γ1-3, δ, and ε) with a conserved N-terminal kinase domain and a variable C-terminal sequence that determines subcellular localization and regulates enzyme activity (1-3). Indeed, multiple inhibitory autophosphorylation sites have been identified near the C terminus of CK1ε (3). This ubiquitously expressed family of protein kinases has been implicated in multiple processes including DNA repair, cell morphology, and Wnt signaling (4). Perhaps the best understood role of CK1 is to provide the priming phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser45 to produce the consensus GSK-3 substrate motif (S/T-X-X-X-pS) (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: B cell linker protein (BLNK), also known as SLP-65 or BASH, is an adaptor molecule that plays key roles in B cell activation and B cell antigen receptor (BCR) engagement. BLNK acts at the interface between BCR-associated Syk and downstream signaling cascades (1,2). BLNK has multiple SH2 binding motifs (YXXP) at its amino terminus and an SH2 domain at its carboxy terminus. After BCR ligation, BLNK is phosphorylated by Syk at multiple YXXP motifs including Tyr72, Tyr84, Tyr96, and Tyr178 (1). These phosphorylated motifs provide docking sites for signaling molecules, such as BTK, PLCγ, and Vav. These signaling molecules bind to BLNK through their SH2 domains and together activate downstream signaling pathways (3,4). Through its SH2 domain, BLNK can also interact with tyrosine-phosphorylated targets, such as HPK1, thereby recruiting them to the BCR complex for signaling (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TBK1 (TANK-binding kinase 1)/NAK (NF-κB activating kinase) is an IκB kinase (IKK)-activating kinase and can activate IKK through direct phosphorylation (1). TBK1 was identified through association with the TRAF binding protein, TANK, and found to function upstream of NIK and IKK in the activation of NF-κB (2). TBK1 induces IκB degradation and NF-κB activity through IKKβ. TBK1 may mediate IKK and NF-κB activation in response to growth factors that stimulate PKCε activity (1). TBK1 plays a pivotal role in the activation of IRF3 in the innate immune response (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: FAF1 was originally identified though yeast two-hybrid screening, interacting with the cytoplasmic domain of Fas, a member of the TNF receptor superfamily that plays a critical role in in apoptosis during development and immune function (1). FAF1 is widely expressed with highest expression observed in testis, skeletal muscle and heart (2). FAF1 potentiates Fas-mediated apoptosis and may induce apoptosis without Fas stimulation in some cell types. It does not contain typical death motifs, but rather has two amino-terminal domains with structural homology to ubiquitin. While the precise role of FAF1 during apoptosis is still unclear, it has been observed to be one of the components of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) during Fas-mediated apoptosis and can bind to caspase-8 and FADD (3). FAF1 has also been shown to suppress the activation of the NF-kappaB transcription factor (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondrial Rho GTPase 1 (Miro1, RHOT1) and mitochondrial Rho GTPase 2 (Miro2, RHOT2) are atypical Ras GTPase proteins that localize to the outer mitochondrial membrane (1,2). These evolutionarily conserved proteins contain GTP-binding domains and a pair of calcium-binding EF hand domains (1,2). Research studies indicate that Miro1 and Miro2 function in the axonal transport of mitochondria in neurons (2). Both Miro proteins play an essential role in mitochondrial trafficking by attaching mitochondria to essential motor and adaptor proteins (3). Miro GTPase proteins that are anchored to the outer mitochondrial membrane interact with kinesin-binding proteins TRAK1 and TRAK2 to provide a link between mitochondria to microtubules (4). Increased levels of synaptic calcium appears to inhibit mitochondrial trafficking mediated by Miro, suggesting a role for the EF hand as a calcium sensor (5).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
PathScan® Cleaved Notch1 (Val1744) Sandwich ELISA Kit from Cell Signaling Technology is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of Notch1 when cleaved at Val1744. A Notch1 rat antibody has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, Notch1 protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a cleaved Notch1 (Val1744) Rabbit detection antibody is added to detect the captured Notch1 protein. Anti-Rabbit IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of the absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of cleaved Notch1 (Val1744).Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Notch proteins (Notch1-4) are a family of transmembrane receptors that play important roles in development and the determination of cell fate (1). Mature Notch receptors are processed and assembled as heterodimeric proteins, with each dimer comprised of a large extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single-pass transmembrane domain, and a smaller cytoplasmic subunit (Notch intracellular domain, NICD) (2). Binding of Notch receptors to ligands of the Delta-Serrate-Lag2 (DSL) family triggers heterodimer dissociation, exposing the receptors to proteolytic cleavages; these result in release of the NICD, which translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of downstream target genes (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Chk2 is the mammalian orthologue of the budding yeast Rad53 and fission yeast Cds1 checkpoint kinases (1-3). The amino-terminal domain of Chk2 contains a series of seven serine or threonine residues (Ser19, Thr26, Ser28, Ser33, Ser35, Ser50, and Thr68) each followed by glutamine (SQ or TQ motif). These are known to be preferred sites for phosphorylation by ATM/ATR kinases (4,5). After DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR), UV irradiation, or hydroxyurea treatment, Thr68 and other sites in this region become phosphorylated by ATM/ATR (5-7). The SQ/TQ cluster domain, therefore, seems to have a regulatory function. Phosphorylation at Thr68 is a prerequisite for the subsequent activation step, which is attributable to autophosphorylation of Chk2 at residues Thr383 and Thr387 in the activation loop of the kinase domain (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glucose homeostasis is regulated by hormones and cellular energy status. Elevations of blood glucose during feeding stimulate insulin release from pancreatic β-cells through a glucose sensing pathway. Feeding also stimulates release of gut hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which further induces insulin release, inhibits glucagon release and promotes β-cell viability. CREB-dependent transcription likely plays a role in both glucose sensing and GLP-1 signaling (1). The protein CRTC2 (CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 2)/TORC2 (transducer of regulated CREB activity 2) functions as a CREB co-activator (2,3) and is implicated in mediating the effects of these two pathways (4). In quiescent cells, CRTC2/TORC2 is phosphorylated at Ser171 and becomes sequestered in the cytoplasm via an interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. Glucose and gut hormones lead to the dephosphorylation of CRTC2/TORC2 and its dissociation from 14-3-3 proteins. Dephosphorylated CRTC2/TORC2 enters the nucleus to promote CREB-dependent transcription. CRTC2/TORC2 plays a key role in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenic gene transcription in response to hormonal and energy signals during fasting (5).CRTC2/TORC2-related proteins CRTC1/TORC1 and CRTC3/TORC3 also act as CREB co-activators (2,3). CRTC1/TORC1, CRTC2/TORC2 and CRTC3/TORC3 associate with the HTLV Tax protein to promote Tax-dependent transcription of HTLV-1 long terminal repeats (6,7). CRTC1/TORC1 is highly phosphorylated at Ser151 in mouse hypothalamic cells under basal conditions (8). When these cells are exposed to cAMP or a calcium activator, CRTC1/TORC1 is dephosphorylated and translocates into the nucleus (8). CRTC1/TORC1 is essential for energy balance and fertility (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: R-Ras, a member of the small GTPase family, is homologous to H-, K- and N-Ras, but does not activate MAP kinase pathways and is only weakly oncogenic (1). Instead, R-Ras is engaged in integrin activation (2). The effector loop and the carboxy-terminal proline-rich and prenylation sites of R-Ras are critical for integrin activation (3,4). Phosphorylation by EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase and Src at Tyr66 of R-Ras suppresses integrin activity (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase 1 (FBP1 or FBPase 1), a rate limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis, catalyzes the conversion of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to fructose-6-phosphate (1). Inhibition of FBP1 expression in basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) cells leads to metabolic reprogramming, including enhanced glycolysis, which leads to increased glucose uptake, biosynthesis of macromolecules, and activation of PKM2 (1). This metabolic reprogramming endows tumor cells with cancer stem cell (CSC)-like properties, thereby increasing their tumorigenicity (1). Depletion of FBP1 was also reported in more than 600 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tumors, suggesting that FBP1 may inhibit ccRCC tumor progression (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Clusterin (CLU, apolipoprotein J) is a multifunctional glycoprotein that is expressed ubiquitously in most tissues. Clusterin functions as a secreted chaperone protein that interacts with and stabilizes stress-induced proteins to prevent their precipitation (1,2). Research studies show that clusterin plays a protective role in Alzheimer’s disease by sequestering amyloid β(1-40) peptides to form long-lived, stable complexes, which prevents amyloid fibril formation (3-5).In addition to the secreted protein, several intracellular isoforms are localized to the nucleus, mitochondria, cytoplasm, and ER. The subcellular distribution of these multiple isoforms leads to the diversity of clusterin functions. Additional studies report that clusterin is involved in membrane recycling, cell adhesion, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and tumor survival (6-9). The clusterin precursor is post-translationally cleaved into the mature clusterin α and clusterin β forms. Clusterin α and β chains create a heterodimer through formation of disulfide bonds (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, CCN2) belongs to the CCN (CYR61, CTGF, NOV) family of secreted extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (1). Members of this family contain four conserved cysteine-rich domains, and interact in the ECM with a diverse array of cell surface receptors, including integrins and heparin-sulfate proteoglycans (2). These interactions regulate a multitude of cellular and tissue functions, including adhesion, proliferation, migration, differentiation, senescence, angiogenesis, inflammation, and wound repair (1, 3-5). The CTGF gene is a transcriptional target of both YAP/TAZ and TGFβ-SMAD signaling pathways (6,7), and aberrant regulation of CTGF expression is strongly associated with pathological conditions, notably cancer and fibrosis (8, 9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Eph receptors are the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). They can be divided into two groups based on sequence similarity and on their preference for a subset of ligands. While EphA receptors bind to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ephrin A ligand, EphB receptors bind to ephrin B proteins that have a transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain (1,2). Research studies have shown that Eph receptors and ligands may be involved in many diseases including cancer (3). Both ephrin A and B ligands have dual functions. As RTK ligands, ephrins stimulate the kinase activity of Eph receptors and activate signaling pathways in receptor-expressing cells. The ephrin extracellular domain is sufficient for this function as long as it is clustered (4). The second function of ephrins has been described as "reverse signaling", whereby the cytoplasmic domain becomes tyrosine phosphorylated, allowing interactions with other proteins that may activate signaling pathways in the ligand-expressing cells (5).The EphA3 receptor preferentially binds ephrin-A5. This ligand-receptor interaction stimulates EphA3 signaling, regulates cell adhesion and migration, and induces cellular morphologic responses (6-8). EphA3 plays a critical role in callosal axon guidance (9), retinotectal mapping of neurons (10), as well as cardiac cell migration and differentiation (11). Investigators have shown that somatic mutations in functional domains of EphA3 are linked to lung cancer progression (12). In addition, EphA3 expression levels have been correlated with tumor angiogenesis and progression in gastric and colorectal carcinoma (13,14).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) forms a heterodimer of at least one NR1 and one NR2A-D subunit. Multiple receptor isoforms with distinct brain distributions and functional properties arise by selective splicing of the NR1 transcripts and differential expression of the NR2 subunits. NR1 subunits bind the co-agonist glycine and NR2 subunits bind the neurotransmitter glutamate. Activation of the NMDA receptor or opening of the ion channel allows flow of Na+ and Ca2+ ions into the cell, and K+ out of the cell (1). Each subunit has a cytoplasmic domain that can be directly modified by the protein kinase/phosphatase (2). PKC can phosphorylate the NR1 subunit (NMDAR1) of the receptor at Ser890/Ser896, and PKA can phosphorylate NR1 at Ser897 (3). The phosphorylation of NR1 by PKC decreases its affinity for calmodulin, thus preventing the inhibitory effect of calmodulin on NMDAR (4). The phosphorylation of NR1 by PKA probably counteracts the inhibitory effect of calcineurin on the receptor (5). NMDAR mediates long-term potentiation and slow postsynaptic excitation, which play central roles in learning, neurodevelopment, and neuroplasticity (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) was initially identified as an enzyme that regulates glycogen synthesis in response to insulin (1). GSK-3 is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates and inactivates glycogen synthase. GSK-3 is a critical downstream element of the PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway whose activity can be inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation at Ser21 of GSK-3α and Ser9 of GSK-3β (2,3). GSK-3 has been implicated in the regulation of cell fate in Dictyostelium and is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway required for Drosophila, Xenopus, and mammalian development (4). GSK-3 has been shown to regulate cyclin D1 proteolysis and subcellular localization (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cohesin complex consists of a heterodimer between SMC1 (SMC1A or B) and SMC3, bound by additional RAD21 and STAG proteins (STAG1, 2, or 3) (1,2). These proteins form a ring-like structure that mediates the cohesion of two sister chromatids after DNA replication in S phase (1,2). RAD21 and STAG2 are phosphorylated by Polo-like kinase (PLK) during prophase, which leads to the dissociation of cohesin complexes from the chromosome arms; however, cohesin remains bound to centromeres until anaphase (3,4). RAD21 is cleaved by separin/ESPL1 in anaphase, which leads to dissociation of the remaining cohesin from centromeres, enabling sister chromatids to segregate during mitosis (5). RAD21 is also cleaved by caspase-3 and caspase-7 during apoptosis, resulting in a 64 kDa carboxy-terminal cleavage product that translocates to the cytoplasm and may help to trigger apoptosis (6,7). In addition to mediating cohesion of sister chromatids, the cohesin complex plays important roles in gene regulation and DNA repair, as SMC1 and SMC3 are both phosphorylated by ATM and ATR kinases upon DNA damage (1,2).