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Product listing: Phospho-Akt Substrate (RXXS*/T*) (110B7E) Rabbit mAb (Magnetic Bead Conjugate) #8050 to TIAR (D26E4) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q01085 #8611

$303
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized by the covalent reaction of formylbenzamide-modified antibody with hydrazide-activated magnetic bead.Phospho-Akt Substrate (RXXS*/T*) (110B7E) Rabbit mAb (Magnetic Bead Conjugate) is useful for immunoprecipitation of phosphorylated Akt substrate proteins.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected, D. melanogaster, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: An important class of kinases, referred to as Arg-directed kinases or AGC-family kinases, includes cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), protein kinase C, Akt, and RSK. These kinases share a substrate specificity characterized by Arg at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated Ser or Thr (1,2). Akt plays a central role in mediating critical cellular responses including cell growth and survival, angiogenesis, and transcriptional regulation (3-5). While a number of Akt substrates are known (such as GSK-3, Bad, and caspase-9) many important substrates await discovery. Akt phosphorylates substrates only at Ser/Thr in a conserved motif characterized by Arg at positions -5 and -3 (6). Phospho-Akt substrate-specific antibodies from Cell Signaling Technology are powerful tools for investigating the regulation of phosphorylation by Akt and other Arg-directed kinases, as well as for high throughput kinase drug discovery.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated YAP (D8H1X) XP® Rabbit mAb #14074.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: YAP (Yes-associated protein, YAP65) was identified based on its ability to associate with the SH3 domain of Yes. It also binds to other SH3 domain-containing proteins such as Nck, Crk, Src, and Abl (1). In addition to the SH3 binding motif, YAP contains a PDZ interaction motif, a coiled-coil domain, and WW domains (2-4). While initial studies of YAP all pointed towards a role in anchoring and targeting to specific subcellular compartments, subsequent studies showed that YAP is a transcriptional co-activator by virtue of its WW domain interacting with the PY motif (PPxY) of the transcription factor PEBP2 and other transcription factors (5). In its capacity as a transcriptional co-activator, YAP is now widely recognized as a central mediator of the Hippo Pathway, which plays a fundamental and widely conserved role in regulating tissue growth and organ size. Phosphorylation at multiple sites (e.g., Ser109, Ser127) by LATS kinases promotes YAP translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it is sequestered through association with 14-3-3 proteins (6-8). These LATS-driven phosphorylation events serve to prime YAP for subsequent phosphorylation by CK1δ/ε in an adjacent phosphodegron, triggering proteosomal degradation of YAP (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin regulatory X domain-containing protein 8 (UBXD8, also known as ETEA and FAF2) is a hairpin-anchored endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein involved in ER associated degradation (ERAD). It influences this process by promoting translocation of misfolded proteins from the ER lumen to the cytoplasm for proteasome-mediated degradation (1). UBXD8 is a sensor for unsaturated fatty acids. In the absence of fatty acids UBXD8 binds to and targets INSIG1 for degradation, ultimately resulting in activation of SREBP-1. Under this condition, UBXD8 also inhibits triglyceride synthesis by blocking the conversion of diacylglycerols into triglycerides. Unsaturated fatty acids trigger UBXD8 polymerization and dissociation of UBXD8/INSIG1 complex, leading to feedback inhibition of SREBP-1 (2, 3). This induces UBXD8 to translocate from the ER to lipid droplets, where it binds to ATGL and inhibits its lipase activity (4, 5). The complex containing p97 and UBXD8 is reported to promote disassembly of the ribonucleoprotein complex to control mRNA stability (6). In addition, UBXD8 binds to and promotes degradation of neurofibromin (NF1), suggesting a role in regulating Ras activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The mTORC1 kinase complex is a critical regulator of cell growth (1,2). Its activity is modulated by energy levels, growth factors, and amino acids via signaling through Akt, MAPK, and AMPK pathways (3,4). Recent studies found that the four related GTPases, RagA, RagB, RagC, and RagD, interact with raptor within the mTORC1 complex (1,2). These interactions are both necessary and sufficient for mTORC1 activation in response to amino acid signals (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) is an RNA-guided DNA nuclease and part of the CRISPR antiviral immunity system that provides adaptive immunity against extra chromosomal genetic material (1). The CRISPR antiviral mechanism of action involves three steps: (i), acquisition of foreign DNA by host bacterium; (ii), synthesis and maturation of CRISPR RNA (crRNA), followed by the formation of RNA-Cas nuclease protein complexes; and (iii), target interference through recognition of foreign DNA by the complex and its cleavage by Cas nuclease activity (2). The type II CRISPR/Cas antiviral immunity system provides a powerful tool for precise genome editing and has potential for specific gene regulation and therapeutic applications (3). The Cas9 protein and a guide RNA consisting of a fusion between a crRNA and a trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA) must be introduced or expressed in a cell. A 20-nucleotide sequence at the 5' end of the guide RNA directs Cas9 to a specific DNA target site. As a result, Cas9 can be "programmed" to cut various DNA sites both in vitro and in cells and organisms. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing tools have been used in many organisms, including mouse and human cells (4,5). Research studies demonstrate that CRISPR can be used to generate mutant alleles or reporter genes in rodents and primate embryonic stem cells (6-8).Cas9 (S. aureus) is a Cas9 ortholog that is smaller, but as efficient, as the more commonly used Cas9 ortholog, Cas9 (S. Pyogenes) (9).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated FoxO3a (D19A7) Rabbit mAb #12829.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The Forkhead family of transcription factors is involved in tumorigenesis of rhabdomyosarcoma and acute leukemias (1-3). Within the family, three members (FoxO1, FoxO4, and FoxO3a) have sequence similarity to the nematode orthologue DAF-16, which mediates signaling via a pathway involving IGFR1, PI3K, and Akt (4-6). Active forkhead members act as tumor suppressors by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Increased expression of any FoxO member results in the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p27 Kip1. Forkhead transcription factors also play a part in TGF-β-mediated upregulation of p21 Cip1, a process negatively regulated through PI3K (7). Increased proliferation results when forkhead transcription factors are inactivated through phosphorylation by Akt at Thr24, Ser256, and Ser319, which results in nuclear export and inhibition of transcription factor activity (8). Forkhead transcription factors can also be inhibited by the deacetylase sirtuin (SirT1) (9).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: NKX3.1 is a homeobox transcription factor that in mammals plays a defining role in embryonic prostate morphogenesis. The expression of mammalian NKX3.1 is androgen-dependent, restricted primarily to developing and mature prostate epithelium, and is frequently reduced or lost in prostate cancer (1-3). The human NKX3.1 gene is located on chromsome 8p21.2, within a region that shows loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in >50% of prostate cancer cases (2). Allelic loss at the NKX3.1 locus is also common in high grade Prostate Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PIN), thought to be a putative precursor lesion to invasive prostate adenocarcinomas, suggesting that LOH at the NKX3.1 locus is a critical early step in prostate cancer development (4). Notably, the remaining NKX3.1 allele is intact in the majority of LOH cases, leading to the suggestion that NKX3.1 functions as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor (4-6). Due to its highly restricted expression in prostate epithelial cells, NKX3.1 has been suggested as a diagnostic marker of prostate carcinoma (7), and may have additional utility as a biomarker of metastatic lesions originating in the prostate (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Hemoglobin (Hb, Hgb) is a heme-containing transport protein found primarily in the red blood cells of humans and most other vertebrates. The primary function of hemoglobin is to transport oxygen from the external environment to the body tissues. Hemoglobin also facilitates metabolic waste removal by assisting in the transport of carbon dioxide from tissues back to the respiratory organs (1). Mature hemoglobin is a tetrameric protein complex, with each subunit containing an oxygen-binding heme group (2). Multiple isoforms of hemoglobin exist, which vary in relative abundance depending on developmental stage. Adult hemoglobin (HbA) is comprised of two α subunits and two β subunits and is the predominant hemoglobin found in red blood cells of children and adults. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) contains two α subunits and two γ subunits and is the predominant isoform found during fetal and early postnatal development (2,3). Mutations that alter the structure or abundance of specific globin subunits can result in pathological conditions known as hemoglobinopathies (4). One such disorder is sickle cell disease, which is characterized by structural abnormalities that limit the oxygen carrying capacity of red blood cells. By contrast, thalassemia disorders are characterized by deficiencies in the abundance of specific hemoglobin subunits (4). Clinical treatments that are designed to alter the expression of specific hemoglobin subunits can be used to treat hemoglobinopathies (5).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated DNMT1 (D63A6) XP® Rabbit mAb #5032.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The process of SUMO conjugation to target proteins is similar to the molecular chain of events observed with ubiquitin (1). SUMO is conjugated to target proteins through the coordinated action of the cellular SUMO conjugation machinery, which consists of the E1, E2, and E3 enzymes (2). The canonical SUMO E1 activating enzyme is a heterodimer consisting of Ubiquitin-like 1-activating enzyme E1A (UBLE1A, SAE1) and UBLE1B (SAE2, UBA2) subunits. Mature SUMO is activated by E1 in an ATP-dependent reaction that generates adenylated SUMO, which functions as a high-energy intermediate in the formation of a thioester linkage between SUMO and Cys173 of SAE2 (3,4). SUMO is subsequently transferred from SAE2 to the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme UBE2I (5). Research studies indicate that UBLE1A (SAE1) is a nuclear protein and c-Myc transcriptional target whose expression is required for Myc-driven tumorigenesis (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver (PRL) family is a distinct group of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP), containing a signature phosphatase domain but otherwise lacking homology to known PTP proteins. There are currently three known members of the PRL family (PRL1-3). PRL-1 was the first family member to be identified; it was initially characterized as an immediate early gene (IEG) in regenerating liver and mitogen-treated fibroblasts (1). PRL-3, known widely as PTP4A3, is now the most well-characterized member of the PRL family, due to its important role in regulating cell proliferation, and possibly cancer metastasis. While specific substrates of the PRL-family proteins have remained largely undefined, a recent study in colon cancer cell lines reported that PTP4A3 dephosphorylated integrin β1 at Tyr783 (2). PTP4A3 was also shown to play a potential role in the progression of cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting tyrosine phosphorylation of the docking protein p130 (3). Increased rates of both cell proliferation and motility have been observed in immortalized cell lines and murine lung tumor cells over-expressing PTP4A3 (3,4), and elevated levels of PTP4A3 protein are associated with a subset of human cancers (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: First identified as a pro-apoptotic protein that binds the cytoplasmic tail of the TNF receptor superfamily member CD27 (1), Siva-1 also binds several other TNFR family members including glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR) and OX40 (1-3), as well as anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 (4,5). Siva-1 is composed of a central death domain homology region, a C-terminal box-B-like ring finger followed by a zinc finger-like domain, and a unique N-terminal amphipathic helical region (SAH) (1,4). Studies have demonstrated that Siva-1 has the ability to induce cell death via both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways (1-8). The SAH domain of Siva-1 is responsible for the inhibition of the pro-survival activities of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2, leading to caspase-mediated cell death (4,5,8). Siva-1 plays a role in T cell signaling and homeostasis by inhibiting NF-κB activity, also resulting in apoptotic cell death (7,9). An alternative splice variant of Siva-1, Siva-2, lacks part of the SAH and death domains and is less effective at inducing apoptosis (1,2,5,8). Studies in xenografts have shown that down-regulation of Siva-1 inhibits tumorigenesis in response to p53 activation (10). Down-regulation of Siva-1 may also play a role in tumor metastasis through its regulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cell migration (11). Overexpression of Siva-1 is implicated in several pathological conditions including acute ischemic injury (12) and Coxsackievirus infection (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Succinyl-CoA synthetase α subunit (SUCLG1) catalyzes the conversion of succinate to succinyl-CoA and plays a key role in the citric acid cycle (1,2). Deficiency of this enzyme leads to a variety of diseases including fatal infantile lactic acidosis (3) and mitochondrial hepatoencephalomyopathy (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TIAR is a member of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM) family of RNA-binding proteins (1,2). It functions as a translational repressor under conditions of cellular damage (3,4). In response to cellular stress, TIAR associates with eIF1, eIF3, and the 40S ribosomal subunit and forms noncanonical preinitiation complexes that are translationally inactive (3,4). TIAR then aggregates with its family member TIA1 and facilitates the accumulation of the translationally inactive preinitiation complexes into discrete cytoplasmic foci called stress granules. The two major isoforms of TIAR are the products of alternative mRNA splicing (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$115
20 µl
$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$118
10 western blots
100 µl
Apoptosis Cell Extracts (Jurkat Untreated): Total cell extracts from Jurkat cells serve as a negative control. Supplied in SDS Sample Buffer.Apoptosis Cell Extracts (Jurkat + Etoposide): Total cell extracts from Jurkat cells treated with 25 μM etoposide for 5 hours serve as a positive control for activated apoptotic cascades. Etoposide treatment induces proteolytic cleavage of various apoptosis-related proteins including caspases, IAP, and PARP. Supplied in SDS Sample Buffer.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis is a regulated physiological process leading to cell death. Caspases, a family of cysteine acid proteases, are central regulators of apoptosis. Initiator caspases (including 8, 9, 10 and 12) are closely coupled to proapoptotic signals. Once activated, these caspases cleave and activate downstream effector caspases (including 3, 6 and 7), which in turn cleave cytoskeletal and nuclear proteins like PARP, α-fodrin, DFF and lamin A, and induce apoptosis. Cytochrome c released from mitochondria is coupled to the activation of caspase-9, a key initiator caspase (1). Proapoptotic stimuli include the FasL, TNF-α, DNA damage and ER stress. Fas and TNFR activate caspases 8 and 10 (2), DNA damage leads to the activation of caspase-9 and ER stress leads to the calcium-mediated activation of caspase-12 (3). The inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family includes XIAP and survivin and functions by binding and inhibiting several caspases (4,5). Smac/Diablo, a mitochondrial protein, is released into the cytosol upon mitochondrial stress and competes with caspases for binding of IAPs. The interaction of Smac/Diablo with IAPs relieves the inhibitory effects of the IAPs on caspases (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTK6/BRK (protein-tyrosine kinase 6, Breast Tumor Kinase) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that is closely related to the FRK family of kinases and distantly related to SRC family kinases (1). PTK6/BRK possesses an N-terminal SRC homology 3 (SH3) domain that regulates kinase-substrate interactions, an auto-inhibitory SRC homology 2 (SH2) domain, and a carboxy-terminal kinase domain. Phosphorylation at Tyr342 in the activation loop of the kinase domain upregulates kinase activity, whereas phosphorylation at Tyr447 inhibits kinase activity (2). PTK6/BRK is expressed in differentiated epithelial cells in normal skin, gastrointestinal tract and colon, and its expression level is reportedly upregulated in some cancer cell types, including breast carcinoma, prostate cancer and colon cancer (3-5). Although typically localized in the nucleus of normal cells, PTK6/BRK has also been observed in the cytosol and plasma membrane in some contexts, notably during tumor progression, where it likely interacts with unique substrates. In the nucleus, PTK6/BRK functions to mediate signaling events important for differentiation and apoptosis (4); outside the nucleus, PTK6/BRK may function to relay upstream RTK signaling to downstream pathways via phosphorylation and activation of substrates such as paxillin, STAT and AKT, which in turn activate pathways to promote cell survival, invasion and migration. The upregulation, altered subcellular localization and associated signaling functions of PTK6/BRK in tumor cells make it a promising target for cancer therapy (6).

PhosphoPlus® Duets from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) provide a means to assess protein activation status. Each Duet contains an activation-state and total protein antibody to your target of interest. These antibodies have been selected from CST's product offering based upon superior performance in specified applications.

Background: Two related serine/threonine kinases, UNC-51-like kinase 1 and 2 (ULK1, ULK2), were discovered as mammalian homologs of the C. elegans gene UNC-51 in which mutants exhibited abnormal axonal extension and growth (1-4). Both proteins are widely expressed and contain an amino-terminal kinase domain followed by a central proline/serine rich domain and a highly conserved carboxy-terminal domain. The roles of ULK1 and ULK2 in axon growth have been linked to studies showing that the kinases are localized to neuronal growth cones and are involved in endocytosis of critical growth factors, such as NGF (5). Yeast two-hybrid studies found ULK1/2 associated with modulators of the endocytic pathway, SynGAP and syntenin (6). Structural similarity of ULK1/2 has also been recognized with the yeast autophagy protein Atg1/Apg1 (7). Knockdown experiments using siRNA demonstrated that ULK1 is essential for autophagy (8), a catabolic process for the degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (9,10). It appears that Atg1/ULK1 can act as a convergence point for multiple signals that control autophagy (11), and can bind to several autophagy-related (Atg) proteins, regulating phosphorylation states and protein trafficking (12-16).

The Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys36) Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting levels of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys36 using methyl-specific and control histone H3 antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$327
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-4E-BP1 (Thr37/46) (236B4) Rabbit mAb #2855.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Translation repressor protein 4E-BP1 (also known as PHAS-1) inhibits cap-dependent translation by binding to the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 disrupts this interaction and results in activation of cap-dependent translation (1). Both the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway and FRAP/mTOR kinase regulate 4E-BP1 activity (2,3). Multiple 4E-BP1 residues are phosphorylated in vivo (4). While phosphorylation by FRAP/mTOR at Thr37 and Thr46 does not prevent the binding of 4E-BP1 to eIF4E, it is thought to prime 4E-BP1 for subsequent phosphorylation at Ser65 and Thr70 (5).

$132
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Isotype control antibodies are used to estimate the nonspecific binding of target primary antibodies due to Fc receptor binding or other protein-protein interactions. An isotype control antibody should have the same immunoglobulin type and be used at the same concentration as the test antibody.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian alkaline phosphatases (APs) are highly conserved zinc-containing allosteric enzymes that are able to hydrolyze and transphosphorylate a wide range of compounds (1). There are four known human alkaline phosphatase isozymes: TNAP (tissue-nonspecific; bone/liver/kidney), ALPP (placental), ALPP2 (germ cell), and ALPI (intestinal) (2). Placental alkaline phosphatase (ALPP) is bound to the plasma membrane via a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (3). It is expressed primarily in the placenta (4) and may be involved in transplacental IgG transport (5). ALPP has been found to be overexpressed on the surface of several different types of solid tumor cells (6) and elevated serum concentrations of ALPP and ALPP-like enzymes has been found to be associated with ovarian, cervical, and testicular cancer (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Caspase-3 (CPP-32, Apoptain, Yama, SCA-1) is a critical executioner of apoptosis, as it is either partially or totally responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many key proteins, such as the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) (1). Activation of caspase-3 requires proteolytic processing of its inactive zymogen into activated p17 and p12 fragments. Cleavage of caspase-3 requires the aspartic acid residue at the P1 position (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Postsynaptic Density Protein 93 (PSD93) is a member of the PSD subfamily of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (PSD-MAGUK) proteins. Structurally, it most closely resembles PSD95, consisting of an N-terminal variable segment followed by three PDZ domains, an SH3 domain, and an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain (1,2). PSD93 is expressed in neuronal cells and located at the synapse where it interacts with neuronal receptors and proteins including the NMDA receptor (2-4), K+ channels (5,6), and the AMPA receptor (7) to regulate their membrane localization and neuronal signaling. Research studies have implicated PSD93 in postsynaptic related persistent pain induction, making PSD93 a potential target for treatment of this syndrome (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TIAR is a member of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM) family of RNA-binding proteins (1,2). It functions as a translational repressor under conditions of cellular damage (3,4). In response to cellular stress, TIAR associates with eIF1, eIF3, and the 40S ribosomal subunit and forms noncanonical preinitiation complexes that are translationally inactive (3,4). TIAR then aggregates with its family member TIA1 and facilitates the accumulation of the translationally inactive preinitiation complexes into discrete cytoplasmic foci called stress granules. The two major isoforms of TIAR are the products of alternative mRNA splicing (5,6).