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Product listing: Phospho-53BP1 (Ser1618) (D4H11) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q12888 #6209 to PSA/KLK3 (D2A8) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P07288 #5877

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) was originally identified as a p53 binding partner that could enhance the transcriptional activity of p53 (1,2). 53BP1 consists of two BRCA1 carboxy terminal (BRCT) domains that allow for binding to p53 and a separate domain responsible for binding to phosphorylated histone H2A.X (3). 53BP1 rapidly translocates to nuclear foci following treatment of cells with ionizing radiation (IR) or radiomimetic agents that cause DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) (4,5). Because of this localization to DSBs and homology to the yeast protein Rad9, a role for 53BP1 in DSB repair has been proposed. Recruitment of 53BP1 to sites of DNA damage has been demonstrated to be independent of ATM, NBS1, and DNA-PK (4) and retention of 53BP1 at DNA breaks requires phosphorylated H2A.X (6). In cells lacking 53BP1, phosphorylation of ATM substrates is reduced, suggesting that 53BP1 is upstream of ATM (7). In response to IR, phosphorylation of 53BP1 at serines 6, 25, 29, and 784 by ATM has been demonstrated, but phosphorylation at these sites is not required for localization of 53BP1 to sites of DSBs (6). Phosphorylation of 53BP1 at Ser1618 has been reported to be enriched in human cells arrested in mitosis (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Plasminogen is the inactive, proenzyme precursor to the serine protease plasmin that degrades fibrin within blood clots, promotes cell migration through proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix proteins, and regulates angiogenesis and wound healing through activation of matrix metalloproteases (1-4). Inactive plasminogen is produced and secreted by liver cells and is found in the circulatory system and extracellular fluids (1). The plasminogen protein is composed of an amino terminal preactivation peptide followed by five kringle domains and a serine proteinase domain (5). The plasminogen zymogen binds to sites on the cell surface and is subsequently cleaved to release the active serine proteinase plasmin. Identified plasminogen cell surface receptors (including S100A10, enolase and PLGRKT) share carboxy-terminal lysine residues that interact with plasminogen kringle domains, resulting in cell surface localization of plasminogen (6-8). Cleavage of plasminogen can be catalyzed by a number of distinct enzymes, including tissue specific plasminogen activator (tPA), urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), and kallikrein (1). An additional plasminogen cleavage product is the angiogenesis inhibitor angiostatin, which is derived from the first four kringle domains (9). A number of related angiogenesis inhibitors, derived from various parts of the plasminogen kringle region, have been shown to inhibit endothelial cell growth and proliferation (10). Mutations in the corresponding PLG gene have been linked to plasminogen deficiencies, characterized by decreased plasmin expression and ligneous conjunctivitis in some individuals (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vav proteins belong to the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho/Rac small GTPases. The three identified mammalian Vav proteins (Vav1, Vav2 and Vav3) differ in their expression. Vav1 is expressed only in hematopoietic cells and is involved in the formation of the immune synapse. Vav2 and Vav3 are more ubiquitously expressed. Vav proteins contain the Dbl homology domain, which confers GEF activity, as well as protein interaction domains that allow them to function in pathways regulating actin cytoskeleton organization (reviewed in 1). Phosphorylation stimulates the GEF activity of Vav protein towards Rho/Rac (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (SGK) is a serine/threonine kinase closely related to Akt (1). SGK is rapidly induced in response to a variety of stimuli, including serum, glucocorticoid, follicle stimulating hormone, osmotic shock, and mineralocorticoids. SGK activation can be accomplished via HGF PI3K-dependent pathways and by integrin-mediated PI3K-independent pathways (2,3). Induction and activation of SGK has been implicated in activating the modulation of anti-apoptotic and cell cycle regulation (4-6). SGK also plays an important role in activating certain potassium, sodium, and chloride channels, suggesting its involvement in the regulation of processes such as cell survival, neuronal excitability, and renal sodium excretion (2). SGK is negatively regulated by ubiquitination and proteasome degradation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Pacific Blue™ fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phopho-SLP-76 (Ser376) (D7S1K) XP® Rabbit mAb #92711.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76) is a hematopoietic adaptor protein that is important in multiple biochemical signaling pathways and necessary for T cell development and activation (1). ZAP-70 phosphorylates SLP-76 and LAT as a result of TCR ligation. SLP-76 has amino-terminal tyrosine residues followed by a proline rich domain and a carboxy-terminal SH2 domain. Phosphorylation of Tyr113 and Tyr128 result in recruitment of the GEF Vav and the adapter protein Nck (2). TCR ligation also leads to phosphorylation of Tyr145, which mediates an association between SLP-76 and Itk, which is accomplished in part via the proline rich domain of SLP-76 and the SH3 domain of ITK (3). Furthermore, the proline rich domain of SLP-76 binds to the SH3 domains of Grb2-like adapter Gads (3,4). In resting cells, SLP-76 is predominantly in the cytosol. Upon TCR ligation, SLP-76 translocates to the plasma membrane and promotes the assembly of a multi-protein signaling complex that includes Vav, Nck, Itk and PLCγ1 (1). The expression of SLP-76 is tightly regulated; the protein is detected at very early stages of thymocyte development, increases as thymocyte maturation progresses, and is reduced as cells mature to CD4+ CD8+ double-positive thymocytes (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Spry1 is a member of the Sprouty (Spry) family proteins that was initially identified in Drosophila as an inhibitor of the FGF signaling pathway (1). There are four human Spry proteins (Spry1-4), encoded by different genes, and they all share a highly conserved carboxy-terminal cystine-rich Spry domain that is known to be essential for their receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitory function stimulated by various growth factors (1-3). Spry1 and other Spry proteins play a key role in embryonic development, tissue and organ formation, as well as growth in almost all living organisms (1-4). Spry proteins are considered tumor suppressors due to their inhibitory function in a variety of growth factor signaling pathways (2,3). Spry1 anchors itself to the membrane by palmitoylation and can translocate from the cytosol to the membrane by binding to caveolin-1 (5,6). Regulation of Spry1 protein function is thought to occur at various levels. Spry1 regulation includes transcriptional regulation by growth factors and kinases (1,4,7), post-transcriptional regulation by microRNA-21 (8), post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, and regulation by its interacting protein partners (2,3).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Phospho-Chk2 (Thr68) Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of Chk2 when phosphorylated at Thr68. A phospho-Chk2 (Thr68) rabbit antibody has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, phospho-Chk2 protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a Chk2 mouse detection antibody is added to detect the captured Chk2 protein. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of the absorbance for the developed color is proportional to the quantity of Chk2 phosphorylated at Thr68.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Chk2 is the mammalian orthologue of the budding yeast Rad53 and fission yeast Cds1 checkpoint kinases (1-3). The amino-terminal domain of Chk2 contains a series of seven serine or threonine residues (Ser19, Thr26, Ser28, Ser33, Ser35, Ser50, and Thr68) each followed by glutamine (SQ or TQ motif). These are known to be preferred sites for phosphorylation by ATM/ATR kinases (4,5). After DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR), UV irradiation, or hydroxyurea treatment, Thr68 and other sites in this region become phosphorylated by ATM/ATR (5-7). The SQ/TQ cluster domain, therefore, seems to have a regulatory function. Phosphorylation at Thr68 is a prerequisite for the subsequent activation step, which is attributable to autophosphorylation of Chk2 at residues Thr383 and Thr387 in the activation loop of the kinase domain (8).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PEA-15 is a 15 kDa phosphoprotein expressed abundantly in astrocytes and fibroblasts as well as in tissues, including the lung and eye (1). The protein has been shown to coordinate cell growth, death, and glucose utilization (2-4). The amino-terminal DED domain of PEA-15 mediates its binding to FADD or Erk and further regulates the Erk and apoptosis signaling pathways. PEA-15 can be phosphorylated at two serine residues, Ser104 and Ser116, located within the carboxy terminus. Phosphorylation at these sites regulates binding to Erk and FADD (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The CXXC-type zinc finger protein 5 (CXXC5) is a nuclear protein that regulates gene expression and is involved in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation, apoptosis, cell adhesion, and cytoskeletal organization. The CXXC5 protein is also known as retinoid-inducible nuclear factor (RINF) as it was originally identified from a set of genes upregulated by retinoic acid stimulation (1). CXXC5 is a transcriptional activator of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor VEGFR2. The CXXC5 protein regulates differentiation and migration of endothelial cells and subsequent blood vessel formation downstream of bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling (2). CXXC5 also regulates TNFα-induced apoptosis by facilitating phosphorylation of Smad3 and the nuclear translocation of Smad4 (3). Expression of CXXC5 in skeletal muscle regulates expression of genes involved in skeletal myogenesis (4). This nuclear factor also plays an important role in the regulation of normal myelopoiesis. The CXXC5 gene is localized to the 5q31.2 chromosomal region that is often involved in abnormalities associated with various myeloid malignancies, and CXXC5 over-expression is associated with decreased overall survival in human AML (5). Interestingly, CXXC5 is also over-expressed in many solid tumors, and high expression is also correlated with poor prognosis in breast cancer (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cytosolic malic enzyme (ME1) catalyzes the conversion of malate and NADP+ to pyruvate and NADPH (1,2). NADPH is then used for fatty acid biosynthesis and lipogenesis (1,2). Cytosolic malic enzyme was shown to mediate high fat diet-induced adiposity (1). Mitochondrial malic enzyme (ME2) preferentially uses NAD+ to catalyze the conversion of malate to pyruvate with the concomitant generation of NADH (2). Recent studies have demonstrated that the tumor suppressor p53 regulates cell metabolism and proliferation by repressing the expression of both cytosolic malic enzyme and mitochondrial malic enzyme (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic cell proliferation depends strictly upon the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), whose main function is to trigger the transition of the cell cycle from metaphase to anaphase. The APC/C complex promotes the assembly of polyubiquitin chains on substrate proteins in order to target these proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome (1,2). The vertebrate APC/C complex consists of as many as 15 subunits, including multiple scaffold proteins, two catalytic subunits (APC2, APC11), and a number of proteins responsible for substrate recognition (3). All E3 enzymes, including APC/C, utilize ubiquitin residues activated by E1 enzymes and transferred to E2 enzymes. Research studies indicate that APC/C interacts with the E2 enzymes UBE2S and UBE2C via the RING-finger domain-containing subunit APC11 (4-6). APC/C function relies on multiple cofactors, including an APC/C coactivator formed by the cell division control protein 20 homolog (CDC20) and Cdh1/FZR1. The CDC20/Cdh1 coactivator is responsible for recognition of APC/C substrates through interaction with specific D-box and KEN-box recognition elements within these substrates (7-9).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Chk2 is the mammalian orthologue of the budding yeast Rad53 and fission yeast Cds1 checkpoint kinases (1-3). The amino-terminal domain of Chk2 contains a series of seven serine or threonine residues (Ser19, Thr26, Ser28, Ser33, Ser35, Ser50, and Thr68) each followed by glutamine (SQ or TQ motif). These are known to be preferred sites for phosphorylation by ATM/ATR kinases (4,5). After DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR), UV irradiation, or hydroxyurea treatment, Thr68 and other sites in this region become phosphorylated by ATM/ATR (5-7). The SQ/TQ cluster domain, therefore, seems to have a regulatory function. Phosphorylation at Thr68 is a prerequisite for the subsequent activation step, which is attributable to autophosphorylation of Chk2 at residues Thr383 and Thr387 in the activation loop of the kinase domain (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is the founding member of a family of methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) proteins that also includes MBD1, MBD2, MBD3, MBD4, MBD5 and MBD6 (1-3). Apart from MBD3, these proteins bind methylated cytosine residues in the context of the di-nucleotide 5´-CG-3´ to establish and maintain regions of transcriptionally inactive chromatin by recruiting a variety of co-repressor proteins (2). MeCP2 recruits histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2, and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 (4-6). MBD1 couples transcriptional silencing to DNA replication and interacts with the histone methyltransferases ESET and SUV39H1 (7,8). MBD2 and MBD3 co-purify as part of the NuRD (nucleosome remodeling and histone de-acetylation) co-repressor complex, which contains the chromatin remodeling ATPase Mi-2, HDAC1 and HDAC2 (9,10). MBD5 and MBD6 have recently been identified and little is known regarding their protein interactions. MBD proteins are associated with cancer and other diseases; MBD4 is best characterized for its role in DNA repair and MBD2 has been linked to intestinal cancer (11,12). Mutations in the MeCP2 gene cause the neurologic developmental disorder Rett Syndrome (13). MeCP2 protein levels are high in neurons, where it plays a critical role in multiple synaptic processes (14). In response to various physiological stimuli, MeCP2 is phosphorylated on Ser421 and regulates the expression of genes controlling dendritic patterning and spine morphogenesis (14). Disruption of this process in individuals with altered MeCP2 may cause the pathological changes seen in Rett Syndrome.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: GTPase Regulator Associated with Focal Adhesion Kinase-1 (GRAF1), is a GTPase-activating protein for the small G proteins RhoA and Cdc42 (1). It is composed of an N-terminal BAR domain, a PH domain, a RhoGAP domain, a proline-rich domain, and a C-terminal SH3 domain. GRAF1 contributes to the clathrin-independent carriers/GPI-enriched early endosomal compartments (CLIC/GEEC) pathway, and was the first specific protein component of this endocytic pathway to be discovered (2). GRAF1 was identified as an important protein necessary for adeno-associated virus 2 infection (3). In addition, research studies have linked GRAF1 to mental retardation (4), skeletal muscle differentiation (5), and myeloid leukemia (6,7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) is a neuronal phosphoprotein that regulates the structure and stability of microtubules, neuronal morphogenesis, cytoskeleton dynamics, and organelle trafficking in axons and dendrites (1). Multiple MAP2 isoforms are expressed in neurons, including high molecular weight MAP2A and MAP2B (280 and 270 kDa), and low molecular weight MAP2C and MAP2D (70 and 75 kDa). Phosphorylation of MAP2 modulates its association with the cytoskeleton and is developmentally regulated. GSK-3 and p44/42 MAP kinase phosphorylate MAP2 at Ser136, Thr1620, and Thr1623 (2,3). Phosphorylation at Thr1620/1623 by GSK-3 inhibits MAP2 association with microtubules and microtubule stability (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate-O-acyltransferase 2 enzyme (AGPAT2) catalyzes the acylation of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) into phosphatidic acid (PA), which is a precursor for the synthesis of triacylglycerol and phospholipid (1,2). AGPAT2 is highly expressed in adipose tissues, liver, and skeletal muscle (3). The induced knockdown of AGPAT2 expression results in decreased expression of adipogenic proteins and delayed expression of adipogenic marker proteins, suggesting that AGPAT2 plays an important role in adipocyte growth and differentiation (4). Mutations in the corresponding AGPAT2 gene cause autosomal recessive congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 1 (CGL1), also described as Berardinelli-Seip syndrome. Patients with CGL1 are born without detectable white adipose tissue and tend to develop severe insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes during childhood (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Forkhead family of transcription factors is involved in tumorigenesis of rhabdomyosarcoma and acute leukemias (1-3). Within the family, three members (FoxO1, FoxO4, and FoxO3a) have sequence similarity to the nematode orthologue DAF-16, which mediates signaling via a pathway involving IGFR1, PI3K, and Akt (4-6). Active forkhead members act as tumor suppressors by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Increased expression of any FoxO member results in the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p27 Kip1. Forkhead transcription factors also play a part in TGF-β-mediated upregulation of p21 Cip1, a process negatively regulated through PI3K (7). Increased proliferation results when forkhead transcription factors are inactivated through phosphorylation by Akt at Thr24, Ser256, and Ser319, which results in nuclear export and inhibition of transcription factor activity (8). Forkhead transcription factors can also be inhibited by the deacetylase sirtuin (SirT1) (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GFAT1, glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate aminotransferase 1, is the rate-limiting enzyme of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (1). This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of fructose-6-phosphate and glutamine to glucosamine-6-phosphate and glutamate (2). The hexosamine biosynthesis pathway generates the building blocks for protein and lipid glycosylation (2). Furthermore, studies suggest that increased activity of this pathway is a contributing factor to hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance (1,2). GFAT1 is more active in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients (3). Transgenice mice overexpressing this enzyme in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue show an insulin resistance phenotype (4,5). GFAT2, an isoenzyme of GFAT1, was later identified (6, 7). Studies show that the regulation of GFAT2 is different from that of GFAT1, suggesting differential regulation of the hexosamine pathway in different tissues (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RANTES/CCL5 (regulated upon activation, T cell expressed and secreted) is a member of the "C-C" or β family of chemokines that induce inflammation and are associated with a number of inflammatory disorders (1,2). RANTES is produced and secreted mainly by CD8+ T cells, macrophages, and platelets, as well as epithelial cells, fibroblasts and some solid tumors (2-7). RANTES acts as a chemoattractant and has other regulatory functions on a number of cell types including monocytes, memory T cells, NK cells, eosinophils, basophils, dendritic cells, and mast cells (3, 7-9). Signaling by RANTES is mediated by several G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), including CCR1, CCR3, CCR4 and CCR5.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group (HMG) proteins are a superfamily of abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind DNA without sequence specificity and induce structural changes to the chromatin fiber to regulate access to the underlying DNA. The HMGN family of proteins, which includes five members (HMGN1-5), is characterized by the presence of several conserved protein domains: a positively charged domain, a nucleosome binding domain, and an acidic C-terminal chromatin-unfolding domain (1,2). HMGN proteins function in transcriptional regulation and are recruited to gene promoters by transcription factors, such as estrogen receptor α (ERα), serum responsive factor (SRF), and PITX2, where they can facilitate either gene activation or repression (3-5). HMGN proteins bind specifically to nucleosomal DNA and reduce compaction of the chromatin fiber, in part by competing with linker histone H1 for nucleosome binding (6). In addition, HMGN proteins act to modulate local levels of post-translational histone modifications, decreasing phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and histone H2A at Ser1 and increasing acetylation of histone H3 at Lys14 (7-9). HMGN proteins can also modulate the activity of several chromatin-remodeling factors and restrict nucleosome mobility (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: There are three members of the steroid receptor co-activator (SRC) family of proteins: SRC-1 (NCoA-1), SRC-2 (TIF2/GRIP1/NCoA-2), and SRC-3 (ACTR/pCIP/RAC3/TRAM-1/AIB1). All SRC family members share significant structural homology and function to stimulate transcription mediated by nuclear hormone receptors and other transcriptional activators such as Stat3, NF-κB, E2F1, and p53 (1-4). Two SRC proteins, SRC-1 and SRC-3, function as histone acetyltransferases (5,6). In addition, all three family members can recruit other histone acetyltransferases (CBP/p300, PCAF) and histone methyltransferases (PRMT1, CARM1) to target promoters and cooperate to enhance expression of many genes (5-8). The SRC proteins play important roles in multiple physiological processes including cell proliferation, cell survival, somatic cell growth, mammary gland development, female reproductive function, and vasoprotection (9). SRC-1 and SRC-3 are conduits for kinase-mediated growth factor signaling to the estrogen receptor and other transcriptional activators. Seven SRC-1 phosphorylation sites and six SRC-3 phosphorylation sites have been identified, which are induced by steroids, cytokines, and growth factors and involve multiple kinase signaling pathways (9-11). Research has shown that all three SRC family members are associated with increased activity of nuclear receptors in breast, prostate, and ovarian carcinomas. According to the literature, SRC-3 is frequently amplified or overexpressed in a number of cancers (12), and SRC-1/PAX3 and SRC-2/MYST3 translocations are found associated with rhabdomyosarcoma and acute myeloid leukemia, respectively (13,14).

This peptide is used to specifically block mTOR (7C10) Rabbit mAb #2983 reactivity.

Background: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, FRAP, RAFT) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase (1-3) that functions as an ATP and amino acid sensor to balance nutrient availability and cell growth (4,5). When sufficient nutrients are available, mTOR responds to a phosphatidic acid-mediated signal to transmit a positive signal to p70 S6 kinase and participate in the inactivation of the eIF4E inhibitor, 4E-BP1 (6). These events result in the translation of specific mRNA subpopulations. mTOR is phosphorylated at Ser2448 via the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway and autophosphorylated at Ser2481 (7,8). mTOR plays a key role in cell growth and homeostasis and may be abnormally regulated in tumors. For these reasons, mTOR is currently under investigation as a potential target for anti-cancer therapy (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Structural maintenance of chromosomes 1 (SMC1) protein is a chromosomal protein member of the cohesin complex that enables sister chromatid cohesion and plays a role in DNA repair (1,2). ATM/NBS1-dependent phosphorylation of SMC1 occurs at Ser957 and Ser966 in response to ionizing radiation (IR) as part of the intra-S-phase DNA damage checkpoint (3). SMC1 phosphorylation is ATM-independent in cells subjected to other forms of DNA damage, including UV light and hydroxyurea treatment (4). While phosphorylation of SMC1 is required for activation of the IR-induced intra-S-phase checkpoint, the precise mechanism is not well understood and may involve a conformational change that affects SMC1-SMC3 interaction (3).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated HDAC1 (10E2) Mouse mAb #5356.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Kallikrein 3 (KLK3), also known as Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), is a member of the glandular kallikrein subfamily of serine proteases (1). It is produced by prostate epithelial cells and is secreted into prostatic ducts. Upon cleavage of 7 amino-terminal amino acids (2), it is activated to liquefy semen in the seminal coagulum. Although PSA/KLK3 is produced in healthy individuals, investigators have found abnormally high levels in the blood of men with advanced prostate cancer (2,3).