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Product listing: ASC (D2W8U) Rabbit mAb (Mouse Specific) (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate), UniProt ID Q9EPB4 #23640 to Phospho-Ubiquitin (Ser65) (E5T1W) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P0CG47 #70973

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated ASC (D2W8U) Rabbit mAb (Mouse Specific) #67824.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: TMS1 (target of methylation-induced silencing)/ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD), also referred to as PYCARD and CARD5, is a 22-kDa pro-apoptotic protein containing an N-terminal pyrin domain (PYD) and a C-terminal caspase recruitment domain (CARD) (1-2). The ASC/TMS1 gene was originally found to be aberrantly methylated and silenced in breast cancer cells (2), and has since been found to be silenced in a number of other cancers, including ovarian cancer (3), glioblastoma (4), melanoma (5), gastric cancer (6), lung cancer (7), and prostate cancer (8). Expression of ASC/TMS1 can be induced by pro-apoptotic/inflammatory stimuli (9). During apoptosis ASC/TMS1 is re-distributed from the cytosol to the mitochondria and associates with mitochondrial Bax to trigger cytochrome c release and subsequent apoptosis (10). ASC/TMS1 has also been found to be a critical component of inflammatory signaling where it associates with and activates caspase-1 in response to pro-inflammatory signals (11).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Aiolos (D1C1E) Rabbit mAb #15103.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Aiolos is an Ikaros family transcription factor composed of several zinc fingers that mediate DNA binding and homodimerization or heterodimerization with other Ikaros family members (1). Multiple Aiolos isoforms are generated through alternative splicing of the portion of the transcript encoding the amino-terminal zinc fingers (2). Aiolos is expressed by lymphoid tissues, with highest expression levels seen in mature B and T cells (1). Ikaros family proteins control lymphocyte development by recruiting chromatin remodeling complexes to DNA (3). B cells from mice lacking Aiolos have a reduced threshold for activation, increased proliferation, and elevated levels of IgG and IgE. In addition, Aiolos null mice develop B cell lymphomas (4). In T cells, Aiolos contributes to Th17 cell differentiation by suppressing IL-2 expression (5). Aberrant expression of Aiolos in transformed epithelial cells promotes anchorage independence through downregulation of adhesion-related genes (6). Alterations in the Aiolos gene are observed in near haploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and the genetic locus containing Aiolos is linked to increased susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (7-9).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated 4-1BB/CD137/TNFRSF9 (D2Z4Y) Rabbit mAb #34594.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: TNFRSF9 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (1, 2). It is also called 4-1BB or CD137 (1, 2). 4-1BB/CD137/TNFRSF9 is expressed in activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells and dendritic cells (2-5). The ligand 4-1BBL/CD137L/TNFSF9 on antigen presenting cells binds to 4-1BB/CD137/TNFRSF9 and costimulates the activation of T cells (5). The binding of agonistic antibodies to 4-1BB/CD137/TNFRSF9 also leads to costimulation for T cell activation (5). Studies have shown the effectiveness of targeting 4-1BB/CD137/TNFRSF9 by its agonistic antibodies in cancer immunotherapy (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is a large multi-protein complex that functions as a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, catalyzing the transcription of DNA into RNA using the four ribonucleoside triphosphates as substrates (1). The largest subunit, RNAPII subunit B1 (Rpb1), also known as RNAPII subunit A (POLR2A), contains a unique heptapeptide sequence (Tyr1,Ser2,Pro3,Thr4,Ser5,Pro6,Ser7), which is repeated up to 52 times in the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein (1). This CTD heptapeptide repeat is subject to multiple post-translational modifications, which dictate the functional state of the polymerase complex. Phosphorylation of the CTD during the active transcription cycle integrates transcription with chromatin remodeling and nascent RNA processing by regulating the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes and RNA processing proteins to the transcribed gene (1). During transcription initiation, RNAPII contains a hypophosphorylated CTD and is recruited to gene promoters through interactions with DNA-bound transcription factors and the Mediator complex (1). The escape of RNAPII from gene promoters requires phosphorylation at Ser5 by CDK7, the catalytic subunit of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) (2). Phosphorylation at Ser5 mediates the recruitment of RNA capping enzymes, in addition to histone H3 Lys4 methyltransferases, which function to regulate transcription initiation and chromatin structure (3,4). After promoter escape, RNAPII proceeds down the gene to an intrinsic pause site, where it is halted by the negative elongation factors NELF and DSIF (5). At this point, RNAPII is unstable and frequently aborts transcription and dissociates from the gene. Productive transcription elongation requires phosphorylation at Ser2 by CDK9, the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor P-TEFb (6). Phosphorylation at Ser2 creates a stable transcription elongation complex and facilitates recruitment of RNA splicing and polyadenylation factors, in addition to histone H3 Lys36 methyltransferases, which function to promote elongation-compatible chromatin (7,8). Ser2/Ser5-phosphorylated RNAPII then transcribes the entire length of the gene to the 3' end, where transcription is terminated. RNAPII dissociates from the DNA and is recycled to the hypophosphorylated form by various CTD phosphatases (1).In addition to Ser2/Ser5 phosphorylation, Ser7 of the CTD heptapeptide repeat is also phosphorylated during the active transcription cycle. Phosphorylation at Ser7 is required for efficient transcription of small nuclear (sn) RNA genes (9,10). snRNA genes, which are neither spliced nor poly-adenylated, are structurally different from protein-coding genes. Instead of a poly(A) signal found in protein-coding RNAs, snRNAs contain a conserved 3'-box RNA processing element, which is recognized by the Integrator snRNA 3' end processing complex (11,12). Phosphorylation at Ser7 by CDK7 during the early stages of transcription facilitates recruitment of RPAP2, which dephosphorylates Ser5, creating a dual Ser2/Ser7 phosphorylation mark that facilitates recruitment of the Integrator complex and efficient processing of nascent snRNA transcripts (13-15).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Guinea Pig, Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian sterile-20-like (MST) kinases are upstream regulators of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways that regulate multiple cellular processes, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and cytoskeletal rearrangement (1). This family of serine/threonine kinases includes MST1 (STK4) and MST2 (STK3), two functionally related proteins with conserved amino-terminal kinase domains and carboxy-terminal regulatory domains that contain nuclear export signals (1-3). During apoptosis, caspase-mediated cleavage of MST1/2 removes the inhibitory regulatory domain, triggering autophosphorylation and activation of the kinase domain, which is translocated to the nucleus. Nuclear translocation of the active kinase induces chromatin condensation and other events associated with apoptotic progression (4).Research studies indicate that MST1/2 are orthologous to Drosophila Hippo (Hpo), one of the core regulatory proteins in the Hippo signaling pathway. This evolutionarily conserved program controls tissue growth and organ size by regulating cell proliferation, apoptosis, and stem cell self-renewal. The mammalian Hippo signaling pathway involves a kinase cascade, where the MST1/2 kinases and the SAV1 scaffold protein form a complex that leads to phosphorylation and activation of LATS1/2. The LATS1/2 kinases phosphorylate YAP and TAZ, promoting cytoplasmic sequestration and inhibition of these transcription coactivators (5).

$303
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Mono-Methyl Arginine [mme-R] MultiMab™ Rabbit mAb #8015.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Arginine methylation is a prevalent PTM found on both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. Arginine methylated proteins are involved in many different cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, signal transduction, RNA metabolism, and DNA damage repair (1-3). Arginine methylation is carried out by the arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) family of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to a guanidine nitrogen of arginine (4). There are three different types of arginine methylation: asymmetric dimethylarginine (aDMA, omega-NG,NG-dimethylarginine), where two methyl groups are placed on one of the terminal nitrogen atoms of the guanidine group of arginine; symmetric dimethylarginine (sDMA, omega-NG,N’G-dimethylarginine), where one methyl group is placed on each of the two terminal guanidine nitrogens of arginine; and monomethylarginine (MMA, omega-NG-dimethylarginine), where a single methyl group is placed on one of the terminal nitrogen atoms of arginine. Each of these modifications has potentially different functional consequences. Though all PRMT proteins catalyze the formation of MMA, Type I PRMTs (PRMT1, 3, 4, and 6) add an additional methyl group to produce aDMA, while Type II PRMTs (PRMT5 and 7) produce sDMA. Methylated arginine residues often reside in glycine-arginine rich (GAR) protein domains, such as RGG, RG, and RXR repeats (5). However, PRMT4/CARM1 and PRMT5 methylate arginine residues within proline-glycine-methionine rich (PGM) motifs (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Thyroid Transcription Factor 1 (TTF-1, also known as NKX2-1), a member of the NKX homeobox transcription factor family, was initially discovered in the FRTL-5 rat thyroid cell line (1). Subsequent studies have shown that TTF-1 plays an important role in differentiation and morphogenesis of the developing thyroid, lung, and ventral forebrain (2). TTF-1 controls the expression of several genes, some of which are tissue specific, such as: thyroglobulin, thyroperoxidase, and the thyrotropin receptor in the thyroid; and surfactant proteins and clara cell secretory protein in the lung (2,3). Investigators have found that TTF-1 is expressed in malignant tumors of the thyroid and lung, and it is commonly used as a marker for both primary and malignant lung cancers (4-6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: Much of the dynamic behavior of cellular proteins, including the regulation of molecular interactions (1), subcellular localization (2), and transcriptional regulation (3) is controlled by a variety of post-translational modifications (4). Antibodies specific for these post-translational modifications are invaluable tools in the quest to understand normal and pathogenic molecular and cellular behavior.General protein modification antibodies are designed to react with modified amino acid residues (e.g. phospho-threonine, phospho-tyrosine, acetyl-lysine, nitro-tyrosine) independently of the sequence in which they are embedded. This ability to recognize modified residues in a "context-independent" fashion gives these antibodies broad reactivities, presumably conferring upon them the ability to react with hundreds of distinct proteins. This broad pattern of reactivity makes these antibodies especially valuable in multiplex analyses and target discovery programs.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming acid coiled-coil (TACC) proteins are a family of proteins characterized by a common coiled-coil motif of approximately 200 amino acids at the carboxy-terminal end (1). Three family members have been identified in humans: TACC1, TACC2, and TACC3. These proteins are thought to be involved in centrosomal microtubule assembly and have been mapped to chromosomal regions that are disrupted in some cancers (reviewed in 2). TACC3 has been shown to be upregulated in many cancer cell lines (3). When phosphorylated at Ser558 by Aurora A, mammalian TACC3 is localized to mitotic spindles and increases microtubule stability (4,5). For this reason, it has been suggested that monitoring the localization of phosphorylated TACC3 would be an effective way to determine the efficacy of Aurora A inhibitors that show promise as anti-cancer drugs (6,7). In addition, studies have shown that TACC3 could be useful as a prognostic marker for non-small cell lung cancer (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Ras family small GTPase Ran is involved in nuclear envelope formation, assembly of the mitotic spindle, and nuclear transport (1,2). Like other small GTPases, Ran is active in its GTP-bound form and inactive in its GDP-bound form. Nuclear RanGTP concentration is maintained through nuclear localization of guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity, which catalyzes the exchange of bound GDP for GTP. Regulator of chromatin condensation 1 (RCC1) is the only known RanGEF (3). RCC1 is dynamically chromatin-bound throughout the cell cycle, and this localization is required for mitosis to proceed normally (4,5). Appropriate association of RCC1 with chromatin is regulated through amino-terminal phosphorylation (5,6) and methylation (7). RCC1 regulation of RanGTP levels in response to histone modifications regulates nuclear import during apoptosis (8). In mitosis RCC1 is phosphorylated at Ser11, possibly by cyclin B/cdc2 (9-11). This phosphorylation may play a role in RCC1 interaction with chromatin and RCC1 RanGEF activity (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PZR (Protein zero related) is an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that specifically binds the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 through its intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) (1,2). PZR is phosphorylated by c-Src, c-Fyn, c-Lyn, Csk, and c-Abl (3). PP1, a Src family kinase inhibitor, inhibits PZR phosphorylation (4,5). There are three alternatively spliced isoforms, designated as PZR, PZRa, and PZRb; both PZRa and PZRb lack ITIMs (6,7). PZR is the main receptor of ConA and has an important role in cell signaling via c-Src (4). PZR is expressed in many cell types and is localized to cell contacts and intracellular granules in BAECs and mesothelioma (REN) cells. PZR has been implicated as a cell adhesion protein that may be involved in SHP-2-dependent signaling at interendothelial cell contacts (3). Hypertyrosine phosphorylation of PZR was observed during embryogenesis in a mouse model of Noonan syndrome (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and CO2 in the presence of NAD+. Acetyl-CoA then goes into the citric acid cycle where it reacts with oxaloacetate to form citrate. Acetyl-CoA is also used for fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. The reaction of oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate therefore serves as a critical link between glycolysis and the citric acid cycle and lipid metabolism. In mammalian cells, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is located in the mitochondrial matrix (1). This complex is comprised of three enzymes: pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1), dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (E2) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3). Pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) consists of two subunits: α and β. This enzyme catalyzes the removal of CO2 from pyruvate. Mutations in the α subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) lead to congenital defects that are usually associated with lactic acidosis, neurodegeneration and early death (2).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Postsynaptic Density Protein 93 (PSD93) is a member of the PSD subfamily of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (PSD-MAGUK) proteins. Structurally, it most closely resembles PSD95, consisting of an N-terminal variable segment followed by three PDZ domains, an SH3 domain, and an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain (1,2). PSD93 is expressed in neuronal cells and located at the synapse where it interacts with neuronal receptors and proteins including the NMDA receptor (2-4), K+ channels (5,6), and the AMPA receptor (7) to regulate their membrane localization and neuronal signaling. Research studies have implicated PSD93 in postsynaptic related persistent pain induction, making PSD93 a potential target for treatment of this syndrome (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PPIG belongs to a highly conserved class of cyclophilins that function as peptidyl-prolyl-isomerases (PPIases) to catalyze the conversion of cis-proline to trans-proline in a polypeptide chain (1-4). PPIG contains an amino-terminal cyclophilin domain followed by Nopp140 repeats that are involved in its function as a nuclear chaperone (5). The carboxy-terminal of PPIG contains a SR (arginine-serine dipeptide repeat) domain (3,4) that is involved in pre-mRNA splicing and processing (6). PPIG interacts with the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II as well as several other SR family splicing factors. These interactions lead to changes in localization and conformation and suggest a regulatory role in transcription and pre-mRNA splicing in the elongating RNA polymerase complex (7,8). PPIG is found in the nuclear matrix and nuclear speckles and is involved in the regulation of gene expression. PPIG shows a predominantly diffuse cytoplasmic distribution at the onset of mitosis, and in late telophase the isomerase is recruited to the newly formed nuclei (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) binds to the mRNA cap structure to mediate the initiation of translation (1,2). eIF4E interacts with eIF4G, a scaffold protein that promotes assembly of eIF4E and eIF4A into the eIF4F complex (2). eIF4B is thought to assist the eIF4F complex in translation initiation. Upon activation by mitogenic and/or stress stimuli mediated by Erk and p38 MAPK, Mnk1 phosphorylates eIF4E at Ser209 in vivo (3,4). Two Erk and p38 MAPK phosphorylation sites in mouse Mnk1 (Thr197 and Thr202) are essential for Mnk1 kinase activity (3). The carboxy-terminal region of eIF4G also contains serum-stimulated phosphorylation sites, including Ser1108, Ser1148, and Ser1192 (5). Phosphorylation at these sites is blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 and by the FRAP/mTOR inhibitor rapamycin.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: LAT, a transmembrane adaptor protein expressed in T, NK and mast cells, is an important mediator for T cell receptor (TCR) signaling (1). Upon TCR engagement, activated Zap-70 phosphorylates LAT at multiple conserved tyrosine residues within SH2 binding motifs, exposing these motifs as the docking sites for downstream signaling targets (2,3). The phosphorylation of LAT at Tyr171 and Tyr191 enables the binding of Grb2, Gads/SLP-76, PLCγ1 and PI3 kinase through their SH2 domain and translocates them to the membrane. This process eventually leads to activation of the corresponding signaling pathways (1-4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The NF-κB/Rel transcription factors are present in the cytosol in an inactive state complexed with the inhibitory IκB proteins (1-3). Activation occurs via phosphorylation of IκBα at Ser32 and Ser36 followed by proteasome-mediated degradation that results in the release and nuclear translocation of active NF-κB (3-7). IκBα phosphorylation and resulting Rel-dependent transcription are activated by a highly diverse group of extracellular signals including inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines. Kinases that phosphorylate IκB at these activating sites have been identified (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ErbB2 (HER2) proto-oncogene encodes a 185 kDa transmembrane, receptor-like glycoprotein with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity (1). While ErbB2 lacks an identified ligand, ErbB2 kinase activity can be activated in the absence of a ligand when overexpressed and through heteromeric associations with other ErbB family members (2). Amplification of the ErbB2 gene and overexpression of its product are detected in almost 40% of human breast cancers (3). Binding of the c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase to ErbB2 at Tyr1112 leads to ErbB2 poly-ubiquitination and enhances degradation of this kinase (4). ErbB2 is a key therapeutic target in the treatment of breast cancer and other carcinomas and targeting the regulation of ErbB2 degradation by the c-Cbl-regulated proteolytic pathway is one potential therapeutic strategy. Phosphorylation of the kinase domain residue Tyr877 of ErbB2 (homologous to Tyr416 of pp60c-Src) may be involved in regulating ErbB2 biological activity. The major autophosphorylation sites in ErbB2 are Tyr1248 and Tyr1221/1222; phosphorylation of these sites couples ErbB2 to the Ras-Raf-MAP kinase signal transduction pathway (1,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produce mitogenic and angiogenic effects in target cells by signaling through cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. There are four members of the FGF receptor family: FGFR1 (flg), FGFR2 (bek, KGFR), FGFR3, and FGFR4. Each receptor contains an extracellular ligand binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic kinase domain (1). Following ligand binding and dimerization, the receptors are phosphorylated at specific tyrosine residues (2). Seven tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of FGFR1 can be phosphorylated: Tyr463, 583, 585, 653, 654, 730, and 766. Tyr653 and Tyr654 are important for catalytic activity of activated FGFR and are essential for signaling (3). The other phosphorylated tyrosine residues may provide docking sites for downstream signaling components such as Crk and PLCγ (4,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase 2 (CaMKK2) is a member of the CaMK family that contains a central Ser/Thr kinase domain followed by a regulatory domain consisting of overlapping autoinhibitory and CaM-binding regions (1). CaMKK2 can be distinguished from other CaMK family members by the presence of a unique Pro/Arg/Gly-rich insert following the ATP-binding domain (2). CaMKK2 phosphorylates CaMKI at Thr177 and CaMKIV at Thr200 (3). CaMKK2 also phosphorylates AMPKα in response to calcium (4). CaMKK2 has been implicated in long-term memory formation (5) and adipocyte development (6). CaMKK2 is phosphorylated at Ser511 by death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) in a signaling cascade thought to be involved in neuronal death (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: B cell linker protein (BLNK), also known as SLP-65 or BASH, is an adaptor molecule that plays key roles in B cell activation and B cell antigen receptor (BCR) engagement. BLNK acts at the interface between BCR-associated Syk and downstream signaling cascades (1,2). BLNK has multiple SH2 binding motifs (YXXP) at its amino terminus and an SH2 domain at its carboxy terminus. After BCR ligation, BLNK is phosphorylated by Syk at multiple YXXP motifs including Tyr72, Tyr84, Tyr96, and Tyr178 (1). These phosphorylated motifs provide docking sites for signaling molecules, such as BTK, PLCγ, and Vav. These signaling molecules bind to BLNK through their SH2 domains and together activate downstream signaling pathways (3,4). Through its SH2 domain, BLNK can also interact with tyrosine-phosphorylated targets, such as HPK1, thereby recruiting them to the BCR complex for signaling (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of proteins activated in response to nutrient deprivation and in neurodegenerative conditions (1). One of the proteins critical to this process is Beclin-1, the mammalian orthologue of the yeast autophagy protein Apg6/Vps30 (2). Beclin-1 can complement defects in yeast autophagy caused by loss of Apg6 and can also stimulate autophagy when overexpressed in mammalian cells (3). Mammalian Beclin-1 was originally isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen for Bcl-2 interacting proteins and has been shown to interact with Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, but not with Bax or Bak (4). While Beclin-1 is generally ubiquitously expressed, research studies have shown it is monoallelically deleted in 40-75% of sporadic human breast and ovarian cancers (5). Beclin-1 is localized within cytoplasmic structures including the mitochondria, although overexpression of Beclin-1 reveals some nuclear staining and CRM1-dependent nuclear export (6). Investigators have demonstrated that Beclin-1-/- mice die early in embryogenesis and Beclin-1-/+ mice have a high incidence of spontaneous tumors. Stem cells from the null mice demonstrate an altered autophagic response, although responses to apoptosis appeared normal (7). Researchers have also found that overexpression of Beclin-1 in virally infected neurons in vivo resulted in significant protection against Sindbis virus-induced disease and neuronal apoptosis (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents. Control of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and involves proteins encoded by a set of autophagy-related genes (Atg) (1). Formation of autophagic vesicles requires a pair of essential ubiquitin-like conjugation systems, Atg12-Atg5 and Atg8-phosphatidylethanolamine (Atg8-PE), which are widely conserved in eukaryotes (2). Numerous mammalian counterparts to yeast Atg proteins have been described, including three Atg8 proteins (GATE-16, GABARAP, and LC3) and four Atg4 homologs (Atg4A/autophagin-2, Atg4B/autophagin-1, Atg4C/autophagin-3, and Atg4D/autophagin-4) (3-5). The cysteine protease Atg4 is pivotal to autophagosome membrane generation and regulation. Atg4 primes the Atg8 homolog for lipidation by cleaving its carboxy terminus and exposing its glycine residue for E1-like enzyme Atg7. The Atg8 homolog is transferred to the E2-like enzyme Atg3 before forming the Atg8-PE conjugate. During later stages of autophagy, Atg4 can reverse this lipidation event by cleaving PE, thereby recycling the Atg8 homolog (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The transcription factor ATF-2 (also called CRE-BP1) binds to both AP-1 and CRE DNA response elements and is a member of the ATF/CREB family of leucine zipper proteins (1). ATF-2 interacts with a variety of viral oncoproteins and cellular tumor suppressors and is a target of the SAPK/JNK and p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways (2-4). Various forms of cellular stress, including genotoxic agents, inflammatory cytokines, and UV irradiation, stimulate the transcriptional activity of ATF-2. Cellular stress activates ATF-2 by phosphorylation of Thr69 and Thr71 (2-4). Both SAPK and p38 MAPK have been shown to phosphorylate ATF-2 at these sites in vitro and in cells transfected with ATF-2. Mutations of these sites result in the loss of stress-induced transcription by ATF-2 (2-4). In addition, mutations at these sites reduce the ability of E1A and Rb to stimulate gene expression via ATF-2 (2).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The transcription factor ATF-2 (also called CRE-BP1) binds to both AP-1 and CRE DNA response elements and is a member of the ATF/CREB family of leucine zipper proteins (1). ATF-2 interacts with a variety of viral oncoproteins and cellular tumor suppressors and is a target of the SAPK/JNK and p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways (2-4). Various forms of cellular stress, including genotoxic agents, inflammatory cytokines, and UV irradiation, stimulate the transcriptional activity of ATF-2. Cellular stress activates ATF-2 by phosphorylation of Thr69 and Thr71 (2-4). Both SAPK and p38 MAPK have been shown to phosphorylate ATF-2 at these sites in vitro and in cells transfected with ATF-2. Mutations of these sites result in the loss of stress-induced transcription by ATF-2 (2-4). In addition, mutations at these sites reduce the ability of E1A and Rb to stimulate gene expression via ATF-2 (2).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Multiple exome sequencing analyses have uncovered a high frequency of histone H3 driver mutations in a number of different cancers, including diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), chondroblastoma, sarcomas, and HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Previous studies have shown that lysine to methionine histone mutations in these cancers act as potent inhibitors of their respective lysine methyltransferases, resulting in gross alterations to the histone methylation landscape and deregulation of gene expression. In DIPG for example, the histone H3 K27M mutation is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the levels of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27, changes in the distribution of PRC2 on the genome, and altered expression of genes associated with various cancer pathways (1-3). In chondrocytomas, the histone H3 K36M mutation functions to inhibit the WHSC1 (MMSET) and SETD2 histone methyltransferases, resulting in a reduction in the levels of histone H3 lysine 36 tri-methylation and deregulation of a number of cancer-associated genes (4). Similar to the H3K27M and H3K26M mutations, the histone H3 K9M mutation has been shown to inhibit the H3K9-directed histone methyltransferase G9a, resulting in reduced levels of histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation. Given the widespread role of G9a in the regulation of gene expression, it is likely that this K9M mutation also plays a role in cancer.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Chondroblastoma is a rare type of benign tumor that is found at the rounded ends of the long bones in the arms and legs. More than 90% of chondroblastomas have been found to contain a heterozygous mutation in the H3F3A gene encoding the histone variant H3.3 (1). This mutation, a lysine to methionine amino acid substitution in codon 36 (K36M), inhibits at least two histone H3 lysine 36 methyltransferases, WHSC1 (MMSET) and SETD2, resulting in the reduction of global levels of histone H3 lysine 36 methylation (1). Chondrocytes containing the histone H3 K36M mutation exhibit several hallmarks of cancer cells, including increased ability to form colonies, resistance to apoptosis, and defects in differentiation. Reduction of global methylation levels in chondrocytes, resulting from the K36M mutation, contributes to tumorigenesis by altering the expression of cancer-associated genes. The histone H3 K36M mutation is also found to promote sarcomagenesis by impairing the differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells, resulting in undifferentiated sarcomas (2). The K36M mutation alters the histone methylation landscape, resulting in a genome-wide gain in histone H3 lysine 27 methylation and redistribution of polycomb respressive complex 1 and derepression of its target genes known to block mesenchymal differentiation. Finally, the histone H3 K36M mutation is also found in 13% of HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carinomas, again contributing to tumorigenesis by altering global methylation levels of histone H3 lysine 36 (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Ubiquitin is a conserved polypeptide unit that plays an important role in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the activation component E1; the activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2, then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the epsilon-NH2 of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has been implicated in a wide range of normal biological processes and in disease-related abnormalities. Several proteins such as IκB, p53, cdc25A, and Bcl-2 have been shown to be targets for the ubiquitin-proteasome process as part of regulation of cell cycle progression, differentiation, cell stress response, and apoptosis (4-7).