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Product listing: SignalSilence® Bcl-xL siRNA I, UniProt ID Q07817 #6362 to MAG (D10H1) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P20916 #12275

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Bcl-xL siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Bcl-xL expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Bcl-xL prevents apoptosis through two different mechanisms: heterodimerization with an apoptotic protein inhibits its apoptotic effect (1,2) and formation of mitochondrial outer membrane pores help maintain a normal membrane state under stressful conditions (3). Bcl-xL is phosphorylated by JNK following treatment with microtubule-damaging agents such as paclitaxel, vinblastine and nocodazole (4,5).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Bcl-2 siRNA II allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Bcl-2 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Bcl-2 exerts a survival function in response to a wide range of apoptotic stimuli through inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome c release (1). It has been implicated in modulating mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and proton flux (2). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified within Bcl-2 including Thr56, Ser70, Thr74, and Ser87 (3). It has been suggested that these phosphorylation sites may be targets of the ASK1/MKK7/JNK1 pathway and that phosphorylation of Bcl-2 may be a marker for mitotic events (4,5). Mutation of Bcl-2 at Thr56 or Ser87 inhibits its anti-apoptotic activity during glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of T lymphocytes (6). Interleukin-3 and JNK-induced Bcl-2 phosphorylation at Ser70 may be required for its enhanced anti-apoptotic functions (7).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Bad siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Bad expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Bad is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family that promotes cell death by displacing Bax from binding to Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL (1,2). Survival factors, such as IL-3, inhibit the apoptotic activity of Bad by activating intracellular signaling pathways that result in the phosphorylation of Bad at Ser112 and Ser136 (2). Phosphorylation at these sites promotes binding of Bad to 14-3-3 proteins to prevent an association between Bad with Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL (2). Akt phosphorylates Bad at Ser136 to promote cell survival (3,4). Bad is phosphorylated at Ser112 both in vivo and in vitro by p90RSK (5,6) and mitochondria-anchored PKA (7). Phosphorylation at Ser155 in the BH3 domain by PKA plays a critical role in blocking the dimerization of Bad and Bcl-xL (8-10).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Axl siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Axl expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Axl, Sky, and Mer are three members of a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family that share a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain and an extracellular domain similar to those seen in cell adhesion molecules. These RTKs bind the vitamin K-dependent protein growth-arrest-specific 6 (Gas6), which is structurally related to the protein S anticoagulation factor (1). Upon binding to its receptor, Gas6 activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream targets Akt and S6K, as well as NF-κB (2,3). A large body of evidence supports a role for Gas6/Axl signaling in cell growth and survival in normal and cancer cells (4).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Aurora B/AIM1 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Aurora B/AIM1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Aurora kinases belong to a highly conserved family of mitotic serine/threonine kinases with three members identified among mammals: Aurora A, B, and C (1,2). Studies on the temporal expression pattern and subcellular localization of Aurora kinases in mitotic cells suggest an association with mitotic structure. Aurora kinase functional influences span from G2 phase to cytokinesis and may be involved in key cell cycle events such as centrosome duplication, chromosome bi-orientation and segregation, cleavage furrow positioning, and ingression (3). Aurora A is detected at the centrosomes, along mitotic spindle microtubules, and in the cytoplasm of mitotically proliferating cells. Aurora A protein levels are low during G1 and S phases and peak during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 in its catalytic domain increases kinase activity. Aurora A is involved in centrosome separation, maturation, and spindle assembly and stability. Expression of Aurora B protein also peaks during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle; Aurora B kinase activity peaks at the transition from metaphase to the end of mitosis. Aurora B associates with chromosomes during prophase prior to relocalizing to the spindle at anaphase. Aurora B regulates chromosome segregation through the control of microtubule-kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. Expression of both Aurora A and Aurora B during the G2/M phase transition is tightly coordinated with histone H3 phosphorylation (4,5); research investigators have observed overexpression of these kinases in a variety of human cancers (2,4). Aurora C localizes to the centrosome from anaphase to cytokinesis and both mRNA and protein levels peak during G2/M phase. Although typical Aurora C expression is limited to the testis, research studies report overexpression of Aurora C is detected in various cancer cell lines (6).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® AUF1/hnRNP D siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit AUF1/hnRNP D expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: AU-rich element RNA binding protein 1 (AUF1) is also known as heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein D (hnRNP D). AUF1 binds to the AU rich element (ARE) of target mRNA and regulates mRNA decay (1,2). It has a broad range of target genes including IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, Myc, TNF-α, and cyclin D1 (2). Binding of AUF1 to Myc mRNA also affects translation of Myc (3). Recent studies have provided evidence that AUF1 is also involved in the regulation of transcription. AUF1 binds to the promoters of various genes including complement receptor 2 (4), enkephalin (5), and α-fetoprotein (6). AUF1 also binds to the telomerase catalytic subunit Tert promoter and the G-rich telomeric repeat, thus regulating telomere maintenance and normal aging (7,8). AUF1 has four isoforms produced by alternative splicing of a single transcript: p37, p40, p42, and p45 (9,10). All AUF1 isoforms shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm (11, 12). These isoforms have distinct localization and bind to different target mRNAs that contribute to the diversity of AUF1 function (2).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® ATR siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit ATR expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) are PI3 kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members that phosphorylate multiple substrates on serine or threonine residues that are followed by a glutamine in response to DNA damage or replication blocks (1-3). Despite the essential role of ATR in cell cycle signaling and DNA repair processes, little is known about its activation. ATR was long thought to exist in a constitutively active state in cells, with DNA damage-induced signaling occurring via recruitment of ATR to single stranded DNA and sites of replication stress. Phosphorylation of ATR at serine 428 in response to UV-induced DNA damage has been suggested as a means of activating ATR (4,5). Recent work has shown autophosphorylation of ATR at threonine 1989. Like ATM Ser1981, phosphorylation of ATR Thr1989 occurs in response to DNA damage, indicating that phosphorylation at this site is important in ATR-mediated signaling (6,7).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Atg13 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Atg13 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and referred to as autophagy-related (Atg) genes.Atg13/Apg13 was originally identified in yeast as a constitutively expressed protein that was genetically linked to Atg1/Apg1, a protein kinase required for autophagy (4). Overexpression of Atg1 suppresses the defects in autophagy observed in Atg13 mutants (4). Autophagy requires a direct association between Atg1 and Atg13, and is inhibited by TOR-dependent phosphorylation of Atg13 under high-nutrient conditions (5). Similarly, mammalian Atg13 forms a complex with the Atg1 homologues ULK1/2, along with FIP200, which localizes to autophagic isolation membranes and regulates autophagosome biogenesis (6-8). mTOR phosphorylates both Atg13 and ULK1, suppressing ULK1 kinase activity and autophagy (7-9). ULK1 can directly phosphorylate Atg13 at a yet unidentified site, presumably to promote autophagy (7,8). Additional studies suggest that Atg13 and FIP200 can function independently of ULK1 and ULK2 to induce autophagy through an unknown mechanism (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The zinc finger protein ZPR1 (ZNF259) binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and is localized to both cytoplasm and nucleus. The zinc fingers found in ZPR1 and the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR mediate the interaction between ZPR1 and the receptor (1). ZPR1 translocates from the cytoplasm to nucleus following mitogen (i.e. EGF) stimulation (2,3). ZPR1 also interacts with translation elongation factor eEF1A in vivo following EGF treatment (3). The interaction between the zinc finger protein and elongation factor is important for cell proliferation. Cells lacking ZPR1 exhibit abnormal nucleolar function, suggesting that ZPR1 is required for cell viability and nucleolar function in dividing cells (3). ZPR1 knockout mice exhibit significant neurodegeneration, and reduced or altered expression of ZPR1 may contribute to spinal muscular atrophy, a disorder characterized by degeneration of spinal cord neurons (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Following protein synthesis, secretory, intra-organellar, and transmembrane proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. The accumulation of unfolded proteins within the ER triggers an adaptive mechanism known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) that counteracts compromised protein folding (1). The transmembrane serine/threonine kinase IRE1, originally identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a proximal sensor for the UPR that transmits the unfolded protein signal across the ER membrane (2-4). The human homolog IRE1α was later identified and is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues (5). Upon activation of the unfolded protein response, IRE1α splices X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) mRNA through an unconventional mechanism using its endoribonuclease activity (6). This reaction converts XBP-1 from an unspliced XBP-1u isoform to the spliced XBP-1s isoform, which is a potent transcriptional activator that induces expression of many UPR responsive genes (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TAZ is a transcriptional co-activator with a PDZ-binding motif that is regulated by its interaction with 14-3-3 proteins (1). TAZ shares homology with the WW domain of Yes-associated protein (YAP) (1). TAZ is proposed to modulate the switch between proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) via interaction with transcription factors Runx2 and PPARγ. This process is critical to normal tissue development and the prevention of tumor formation. Due to its role in determination of MSC fate, TAZ may have clinical relevance to several human diseases caused by an imbalance of MSC differentiation (2,3). TAZ is negatively regulated via phosphorylation by LATS1/2, core kinases in the Hippo signaling pathway that controls stem cell development, tissue growth and tumor development (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) is a DNA repair enzyme that participates in a suicide reaction that specifically removes methyl or alkyl groups from the O(6) position of guanine, restoring guanine to its normal form without causing DNA breaks (1). MGMT protects cells from alkylating toxins, and is an important factor in drug resistance to alkylating therapeutic agents (2,3). It is ubiquitously expressed in normal human tissues (4) and is overexpressed in many types of human tumors, but epigenetically silenced in other tumors. MGMT silencing is a marker associated with poor prognosis, but is a good predictive marker for response to alkylating agent chemotherapy (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are type 1 transmembrane glycoproteins expressed by natural killer cells and subsets of CD4, CD8, and γδ T cells (1-5). Analogous to the diversity of their human leucocyte antigen class I (HLA Class I) ligands, the KIR genes are polymorphic and the content of the KIR gene cluster varies among haplotypes, although several "framework" genes are found in all haplotypes (6-7). The KIR proteins are characterized by the number of extracellular immunoglobulin-superfamily domains (2D or 3D) and by whether they have a long (L) or short (S) cytoplasmic domain (8-10). KIR proteins with the long cytoplasmic domain transduce inhibitory signals upon ligand binding via an immune tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) (10), while KIR proteins with the short cytoplasmic domain lack an ITIM and instead transduce activating signals (11,12). KIR proteins play an important role in the regulation of the immune response. Combinations of KIR and HLA class I variants influence susceptibility to autoimmunity and infectious disease, as well as outcomes of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). In addition to p53, mammalian cells contain two p53 family members, p63 and p73, which are similar to p53 in both structure and function (2). While p63 can induce p53-responsive genes and apoptosis, mutation of p63 rarely results in tumors (2). Research investigators frequently observe amplification of the p63 gene in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, head and neck (2,3). The p63 gene contains an alternative transcription initiation site that yields a truncated ΔNp63 lacking the transactivation domain, and alternative splicing at the carboxy-terminus yields the α, β, and γ isoforms (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: ALKBH3, also known as Prostate Cancer Antigen-1 (PCA-1), is a DNA and RNA demethylase involved in the repair of alkylated DNA. The protein is overexpressed in prostate cancer and has been linked to other cancer types, including non-small cell lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and pancreatic carcinoma (1-3). ALKBH3/PCA-1 is also a potential therapeutic target in prostate cancer (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Pitrilysin metalloproteinase 1 (PITRM1 or PreP) is a mitochondria-enriched presequence peptidase that processes the mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) of proteins imported across the inner mitochondrial membrane (1). Mitochondria normally function to regulate many cellular processes such as energy production and apoptosis, and its dysfunction may contribute indirectly or directly to human neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease (2, 3; AD and PD, respectively). Interestingly, Aβ, the pathological hallmark of AD, accumulates in mitochondria and inhibits Cym1, the PITRM1 yeast ortholog, leading to impaired MTS processing and accumulation of unprocessed mitochondrial proteins, suggesting an indirect role of Aβ and mitochondrial dysfunction via PITRM1 (4). In addition to biochemical association of PITRM1 with Aβ-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction, human genetics suggest a more direct link as PITRM1 genetic variants have been associated with AD (5, 6). The specific mechanism is currently poorly understood, but may involve impairment of PITRM1-dependent degradation of Aβ, directly resulting in pathological accumulation of Aβ in mitochondria (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Malic enzymes catalyze oxidative decarboxylation of malate to pyruvate (1). The malic enzyme family in mammalian cells includes the cytosolic malic enzyme 1 (ME1) and two mitochondrial malic enzymes (ME2 and ME3) (1, 2). ME1 and ME2 are critical for tumor cell growth and their expression is repressed by tumor suppressor p53 (2). Reduced expression of ME1 and ME2 reciprocally increases the levels and activation of p53, promoting p53-mediated senescence (2). Research studies show ME3 is essential for the survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma following genomic deletion of ME2 (3). Deletion of ME3 is lethal to ME2-null cancer cells, which has been suggested to provide a potential therapeutic opportunity using collateral lethality (3, 4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: FAM134B (family with sequence similarity 134, member B), also referred to as JK-1 and RETREG1, is a cis-Golgi endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transmembrane protein that plays a role in ER homeostasis and may contribute to several human diseases (1). FAM134B contains a conserved LC3 interacting domain (LIR) that facilitates binding to LC3 and GABARAP family members and targets impaired ER to the autophagsome for degradation by ER-phagy (2). Deletion of FAM134B leads to ER expansion and stress-induced apoptosis (2). Expression of FAM134B has been linked to a number of pathological conditions, including viral infection, cancer, and neuronal disorders (1). FAM134B can potentially inhibit viral infection, as demonstrated by studies of FAM134B knockouts that resulted in significantly higher rates of Ebola virus replication (3). Mutations in FAM134B that lead to an accumulation of mis-folded proteins have also been associated with neuronal sensory disorders (2, 4, 5). The expression and mutational state of FAM134B can also have varying effects on cancer. Oncogenic effects of FAM134B were described in esophageal squamous carcinoma; whereas, it appears to have tumor suppressor activity in colorectal cancer (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Extracellular Matrix (ECM) is a complex network of macromolecules that provides structural tissue support to cells in the basement membrane and interstitial matrix. It is composed of many molecules including proteins, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and polysaccharides (1,2). One of the major proteins that comprises the ECM, and the human body, is collagen. Collagens are a large family of proteins. They are trimeric molecules comprised of three alpha polypeptide chains that form a triple helix structure that is characteristic of all collagens (3). The large family of collagens is divided into three sub groups: the fibrillar collagens, the non-fibril forming collagens, and the fibril-associated collagens. These sub groups differ in their structure and supramolecular assembly (3).Collagen11A1 (COL11A1) is a minor fibrillar collagen that is not normally expressed at high levels in most normal tissues with the exception of cartilage where it is expressed in high levels, and some other tissues/ organs, where it is expressed at a lower level (4). However, it has been reported that the expression of this molecule is correlated with advanced tumorigenic disease through meta analysis of data from multiple cancers, including ovarian, colon, breast, and lung (5). Additionally, it has also been associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis (6,7). Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are typically the most abundant cell type in the stroma of many solid tumors. They are thought to contribute to ECM stiffness, which is ultimately thought to contribute to tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapeutic intervention. COL11A1 has been found to be elevated in CAFs and may contribute to chemotherapy resistance (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Aquaporins (AQP) are integral membrane proteins that serve as channels in the transfer of water and small solutes across the membrane. There are 13 isoforms of AQP that express in different types of cells and tissues (1,2). AQP1 is found in blood vessels, kidney, eye, and ear. AQP2 is found in the kidney, and it has been shown that the lack of AQP2 results in diabetes (1,3). AQP4 is present in the brain, where it is enriched in astrocytes (1,2,4). AQP5 is found in the salivary and lacrimal gland, AQP6 in intracellular vesicles in the kidney, AQP7 in adipocytes, AQP8 in kidney, testis, and liver, AQP9 is present in liver and leukocytes and AQP10-11 in the intestine (1,3,4). AQPs are essential for the function of cells and organs. It has been shown that AQP1 and AQP4 regulate the water homeostasis in astrocytes, preventing cerebral edema caused by solute imbalance (5). Several studies have shown the involvement of AQPs in the development of inflammatory processes, including cells of innate and adaptive immunity (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is an interferon-inducible protein containing an amino-terminal pyrin domain and carboxy-terminal HIN-200 domain that functions in innate immunity and tumor progression (1). Expression of AIM2 can inhibit cell growth and tumor formation (2,3). Furthermore, the AIM2 gene has a high frequency of mutations associated with microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancers (4). AIM2 has a critical role in the activation of caspase-1, the protease responsible for the processing of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. Caspase-1 activation is regulated by multi-protein complexes referred to as “inflammasomes” (5,6). Distinct inflammasome complexes have been described containing NLRP1/NALP1, NLRP3/NALP3, IPAF, and AIM2. The HIN-200 domain of AIM2 is responsible for binding to cytoplasmic double stranded DNA, resulting in caspase-1 activation. (7-9). This inflammasome complex also involves binding of the pyrin domain of AIM2 to the CARD-domain protein ASC/TMS1, which then interacts directly with caspase-1. As a result, AIM2 has been demonstrated to be an important sensor for a number of different pathogens (10-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YTH domain-containing protein 1 (YTHDC1) and YTH domain-containing protein 2 (YTHDC2) both belong to a family of proteins that bind to RNA. YTHDC1 and YTHDC2 both recognize and bind to N6-methyladenosine(m6A)-containing RNAs; binding is mediated through the YTH domains (1-3). m6A is a modification that is present at internal sites of mRNAs and some non-coding RNAs and plays a role in regulating mRNA splicing, processing, and stability. YTHDC1, also known as splicing factor YT521, regulates alternative splicing by functioning as a key regulator of exon-inclusion or exon-skipping. YTHDC1 promotes exon-inclusion by recruiting pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF3 to regions containing m6A, while repressing exon-skipping by blocking SRSF10 binding to these same regions (2). Increased expression of YTHDC1 promotes malignant endometrial carcinoma (EC) through alternative splicing of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), resulting in an increase in VEGF-165 isoform and increased EC cell invasion (4). YTHDC2 functions to enhance the translation efficiency of target mRNAs and may play a role in spermatogenesis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Following protein synthesis, secretory, intra-organellar, and transmembrane proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. The accumulation of unfolded proteins within the ER triggers an adaptive mechanism known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) that counteracts compromised protein folding (1). The transmembrane serine/threonine kinase IRE1, originally identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a proximal sensor for the UPR that transmits the unfolded protein signal across the ER membrane (2-4). The human homolog IRE1α was later identified and is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues (5). Upon activation of the unfolded protein response, IRE1α splices X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) mRNA through an unconventional mechanism using its endoribonuclease activity (6). This reaction converts XBP-1 from an unspliced XBP-1u isoform to the spliced XBP-1s isoform, which is a potent transcriptional activator that induces expression of many UPR responsive genes (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ras association domain-containing protein 1 (RASSF1) is a member of the RASSF protein family (RASSF1-10), scaffold proteins whose members are unified by the presence of a Ras association (RA) domain that gives them structural similarity to Ras effector proteins (1). The RASSF1 gene is located in a genomic region exhibiting loss of heterozygosity in a more than 90% of small cell lung cancers, and up to 50% of non-small cell lung cancers (2), strongly implicating the RASSF1 gene as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, RASSF1 expression in tumor cells has been shown to be frequently suppressed by promoter hypermethylation, further suggesting a tumor suppressor function (3-5). Although multiple isoforms (RASSF1A-H) have been described, generated by alternative splicing and/or promoter usage, RASSF1A and RASSF1C appear to be the most widely expressed in normal tissues, with RASSF1A expression lost most frequently in tumor cells (6). Notably, RASSF1A has been identified as an effector protein in the Hippo signaling pathway, where it promotes association between MST1/2 and LATS1/2, leading to suppressive phosphorylation of the transcriptional co-activators YAP and TAZ (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a multi-subunit protein channel that spans the nuclear envelope and is responsible for the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of RNA, proteins, and ribonucleoproteins (1,2). Nucleoporin 153 kDa (NUP153) protein functions as a scaffolding element that recruits other proteins to form the “nuclear basket” on the nuclear side of the pore complex. NUP153 is essential for normal nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins and mRNAs and is critical for the quality control and retention of unspliced mRNAs in the nucleus (1,2). NUP153 is a potential DNA-binding subunit of the NPC and is important for proper regulation of embryonic stem cell pluripotency and differentiation (1,3). Depletion of NUP153 leads to derepression of developmental genes and induction of early differentiation. NUP153 binds to Nucleoporin-Associated Regions (NARs) that are found near the transcriptional start sites of developmental genes and mediates recruitment of Polycomb Repressor Complex 1 (PRC1) to repress transcription in embryonic stem cells (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: NeuroD is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors. These proteins function by forming heterodimers with E-proteins and binding to the canonical E-box sequence CANNTG (1,2). Neuronal activity results in CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of NeuroD at Ser336, which is necessary for formation and growth of dendrites (3,4). NeuroD is also phosphorylated at Ser274 though the results are context dependent as phosphorylation by Erk stimulates NeuroD activity in pancreatic β-cells while phosphorylation by GSK-3β inhibits NeuroD in neurons (3). NeuroD is crucially important in both the pancreas and developing nervous system, and plays a large role in the development of the inner ear and mammalian retina (3). Mice lacking NeuroD become severely diabetic and die shortly after birth due to defects in β-cell differentiation (2,3,5,6). The lack of NeuroD in the brain results in severe defects in development (5). Human mutations have been linked to a number of types of diabetes including type I diabetes mellitus and maturity-onset diabetes of the young (1,3).

$259
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to APC and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: NCAM (neural cell adhesion molecule, CD56) is an adhesion glycoprotein with five extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains followed by two fibronectin type III repeats. Structural diversity is introduced by alternative splicing resulting in different cytoplasmic domains (1). NCAM mediates neuronal attachment, neurite extension and cell-cell interactions through homo and heterophilic interactions. PSA (polysialic acid) post-translationally modifies NCAM and increases the metastatic potential of small cell lung carcinoma, Wilms+ tumor, neuroblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma (2). CD56 and CD16 are commonly used to identify NK cells although some cells with the T cell markers CD3 and CD4 also express CD56 (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant, inherited disorder characterized by the occurrence of vestibular schwannomas, meningiomas, and other nervous system tumors. Both the familial tumors of NF2 and equivalent sporadic tumors found in the general population are caused by inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene. Merlin (moesin, ezrin, and radixin-like protein) is the NF2 gene product, displaying striking similarity to ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins. Regulation of merlin (also called schwannomin) and ERM proteins involves intramolecular and intermolecular head-to-tail associations between family members (1). Merlin and ERM proteins act as linkers between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton, affecting cell morphology, polarity, and signal transduction (2). Merlin is phosphorylated by the Rac/Cdc42 effector p21-activated kinase (PAK) at Ser518, negatively regulating Rac (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), which contains five immunoglobulin-like domains, is a highly glycosylated protein (1). MAG is a component of all myelinated internodes, whether formed by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) or by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) (2), and has several functions. A known function of MAG is its inhibition of axonal regeneration after injury. It inhibits axonal outgrowth from adult dorsal root ganglion and in postnatal cerebellar, retinal, spinal, hippocampal, and superior cervical ganglion neurons (3). Interaction between MAG and several other molecules on the innermost wrap of myelin and complementary receptors on the opposing axon surface are required for long-term axon stability. Without MAG, myelin is still expressed, but long-term axon degeneration and altered axon cytoskeleton structure can be seen (4).