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Product listing: SignalSilence® Atg13 siRNA I, UniProt ID O75143 #12043 to MAGE-A3 (E9S4X) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P43357 #38896

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® Atg13 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit Atg13 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and referred to as autophagy-related (Atg) genes.Atg13/Apg13 was originally identified in yeast as a constitutively expressed protein that was genetically linked to Atg1/Apg1, a protein kinase required for autophagy (4). Overexpression of Atg1 suppresses the defects in autophagy observed in Atg13 mutants (4). Autophagy requires a direct association between Atg1 and Atg13, and is inhibited by TOR-dependent phosphorylation of Atg13 under high-nutrient conditions (5). Similarly, mammalian Atg13 forms a complex with the Atg1 homologues ULK1/2, along with FIP200, which localizes to autophagic isolation membranes and regulates autophagosome biogenesis (6-8). mTOR phosphorylates both Atg13 and ULK1, suppressing ULK1 kinase activity and autophagy (7-9). ULK1 can directly phosphorylate Atg13 at a yet unidentified site, presumably to promote autophagy (7,8). Additional studies suggest that Atg13 and FIP200 can function independently of ULK1 and ULK2 to induce autophagy through an unknown mechanism (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 25 kDa synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP25) is a target membrane soluble, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (t-SNARE) that is found on neuronal presynaptic membranes. SNAP25 forms a core complex with the SNARE proteins syntaxin and synaptobrevin to mediate synaptic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane during Ca2+-dependent exocytosis (1). This complex is responsible for exocytosis of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Neurotransmitter release is inhibited by proteolysis of SNAP25 by botulinum toxins A and E (2). SNAP25 plays a secondary role as a Q-SNARE involved in endosome fusion; the protein is associated with genetic susceptibility to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: IFN-γ plays key roles in both the innate and adaptive immune response. IFN-γ activates the cytotoxic activity of innate immune cells, such as macrophages and NK cells (1,2). IFN-γ production by NK cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs) promotes cell-mediated adaptive immunity by inducing IFN-γ production by T lymphocytes, increasing class I and class II MHC expression, and enhancing peptide antigen presentation (1). The anti-viral activity of IFN-γ is due to its induction of PKR and other regulatory proteins. Binding of IFN-γ to the IFNGR1/IFNGR2 complex promotes dimerization of the receptor complexes to form the (IFNGR1/IFNGR2)2 -IFN-γ dimer. Binding induces a conformational change in receptor intracellular domains and signaling involves Jak1, Jak2, and Stat1 (3). The critical role of IFN-γ in amplification of immune surveillance and function is supported by increased susceptibility to pathogen infection by IFN-γ or IFNGR knockout mice and in humans with inactivating mutations in IFNGR1 or IFNGR2. IFN-γ also appears to have a role in atherosclerosis (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Ras GTPase-activating protein-binding protein 1, also known as GAP SH3 domain-binding protein 1 (G3BP1), was identified as a protein that interacts with the SH3 domain of Ras GTPase-activating protein (RasGap) (1). G3BP1 is involved in the regulation of multiple cellular processes, including mRNA decay and inhibition of translation initiation (2). Furthermore, G3BP1 is essential for the assembly of stress granules (SGs) and functions as an SG-nucleating protein (3). Research studies show that arginine demethylation of G3BP1 promotes SG assembly during oxidative stress (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing protein 6 (CMTM6) is a member of the chemokine-like factor (CKLF)-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing family (1). CMTM6 stabilizes plasma membrane expression of PD-L1, an immune inhibitory ligand critical for immune tolerance to self and anti-tumor immunity (2,3). CMTM6 associates with PD-L1 at recycling endosomes, where it protects PD-L1 from being targeted for lysosomal degradation by preventing STUB1-mediated PD-L1 ubiquitination (2,3). CMTM6 may stabilize PD-L1 expression on antigen presenting cells and potentiate inhibitory signaling by PD-1 on T cells, triggering T cell inhibition and exhaustion. CMTM6 has also been shown to interact with with CD58, ARG1, ENO1, and TMPO (2). Due to the role of CMTM6 in regulating the immune system, it is being investigated as an immunotherapeutic target for the treatment of cancer.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a 100-140 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that exists as several isoforms (1). The amino acid sequence of APP contains the amyloid domain, which can be released by a two-step proteolytic cleavage (1). The extracellular deposition and accumulation of the released Aβ fragments form the main components of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (1). APP can be phosphorylated at several sites, which may affect the proteolytic processing and secretion of this protein (2-5). Phosphorylation at Thr668 (a position corresponding to the APP695 isoform) by cyclin-dependent kinase is cell-cycle dependent and peaks during G2/M phase (4). APP phosphorylated at Thr668 exists in adult rat brain and correlates with cultured neuronal differentiation (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Following protein synthesis, secretory, intra-organellar, and transmembrane proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. The accumulation of unfolded proteins within the ER triggers an adaptive mechanism known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) that counteracts compromised protein folding (1). The transmembrane serine/threonine kinase IRE1, originally identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a proximal sensor for the UPR that transmits the unfolded protein signal across the ER membrane (2-4). The human homolog IRE1α was later identified and is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues (5). Upon activation of the unfolded protein response, IRE1α splices X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) mRNA through an unconventional mechanism using its endoribonuclease activity (6). This reaction converts XBP-1 from an unspliced XBP-1u isoform to the spliced XBP-1s isoform, which is a potent transcriptional activator that induces expression of many UPR responsive genes (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) protein is an innate immune receptor that is expressed on the cell surface of microglia, macrophages, osteoclasts, and immature dendritic cells (1). The TREM2 receptor is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein that consists of an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. TREM2 interacts with the tyrosine kinase-binding protein DAP12 to form a receptor-signaling complex (2). The TREM2 protein plays a role in innate immunity and a rare functional variant (R47H) of TREM2 is associated with the late-onset risk of Alzheimer’s disease (1,3). Research studies using mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease indicate that deficiency and haploinsufficiency of TREM2 can lead to increased β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation as a result of dysfunctional microglia response (4). These results agree with the distribution of TREM2 in human brain regions (e.g., white matter, the hippocampus, and neocortex) that are involved in Alzheimer's disease pathology (2). In addition, amyloid plaque formation induces expression of TREM2 and amyloid phagocytosis (5). Loss-of-function mutations in the corresponding TREM2 or DAP12 genes can result in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare form of progressive presenile dementia that results from polycystic osseous lesions (6). TREM2 membrane shedding occurs by cleavage at the extracellular site between H157/S158 generating an N-terminal shedded fragment and a membrane bound C-terminal fragment (7, 8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) is a DNA repair enzyme that participates in a suicide reaction that specifically removes methyl or alkyl groups from the O(6) position of guanine, restoring guanine to its normal form without causing DNA breaks (1). MGMT protects cells from alkylating toxins, and is an important factor in drug resistance to alkylating therapeutic agents (2,3). It is ubiquitously expressed in normal human tissues (4) and is overexpressed in many types of human tumors, but epigenetically silenced in other tumors. MGMT silencing is a marker associated with poor prognosis, but is a good predictive marker for response to alkylating agent chemotherapy (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are type 1 transmembrane glycoproteins expressed by natural killer cells and subsets of CD4, CD8, and γδ T cells (1-5). Analogous to the diversity of their human leucocyte antigen class I (HLA Class I) ligands, the KIR genes are polymorphic and the content of the KIR gene cluster varies among haplotypes, although several "framework" genes are found in all haplotypes (6-7). The KIR proteins are characterized by the number of extracellular immunoglobulin-superfamily domains (2D or 3D) and by whether they have a long (L) or short (S) cytoplasmic domain (8-10). KIR proteins with the long cytoplasmic domain transduce inhibitory signals upon ligand binding via an immune tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) (10), while KIR proteins with the short cytoplasmic domain lack an ITIM and instead transduce activating signals (11,12). KIR proteins play an important role in the regulation of the immune response. Combinations of KIR and HLA class I variants influence susceptibility to autoimmunity and infectious disease, as well as outcomes of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). In addition to p53, mammalian cells contain two p53 family members, p63 and p73, which are similar to p53 in both structure and function (2). While p63 can induce p53-responsive genes and apoptosis, mutation of p63 rarely results in tumors (2). Research investigators frequently observe amplification of the p63 gene in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, head and neck (2,3). The p63 gene contains an alternative transcription initiation site that yields a truncated ΔNp63 lacking the transactivation domain, and alternative splicing at the carboxy-terminus yields the α, β, and γ isoforms (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Type 1 collagen is the most abundant collagen in many human tissues, including bone, skin, and tendons. It is a trimeric complex comprised of two molecules of COL1A1 (alpha-1 type 1 collagen) and one molecule of COL1A2 (alpha-2 type 1 collagen) (1-3). The expression levels of COL1A1 are regulated by multiple mechanisms, including mRNA stability, translation, and posttranslational modification (3-5). Overexpression of COL1A1 has been positively associated with tissue fibrosis disorders, including systemic sclerosis (6), while loss-of-function mutations in the COL1A1 gene are a major causative factor for osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease) (7). Notably, COL1A1 expression levels have also been associated with tumor development in gastric, lung, thyroid, and breast cancers. Research studies suggest that upregulation of COL1A1 can generate a modified extracellular matrix environment that promotes cancer cell survival, proliferation, metastasis, and invasion (8-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the APOBEC3 subfamily of cytosine deaminases (APOBEC3A, APOBEC3B, APOBEC3C, APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G, and APOBEC3H) function in innate immunity by preventing viral DNA replication, including that of HIV-1 (1-2). APOBEC3B mutation and aberrant expression in cancer is thought to result in mutation of genomic DNA, and to drive tumorigenesis. APOBEC3B is highly expressed in human breast cancer, glioma, and other human cancers (3-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is an abundant RNA modification that plays an important role in mRNA splicing, processing, and stability. The m6A modification is specifically recognized by members of the YT521B homology (YTH) domain-containing family (YTHDF), consisting of YTHDF1, YTHDF2, and YTHDF3. All three members of the YTHDF family are primarily cytosolic proteins that share similar sequence and domain structure, including a conserved C-terminal YTH domain that specifically interacts with m6A (1). Despite these similarities, recent studies suggest that YTHDF proteins are involved in distinct regulatory functions with minimal overlap. Specifically, YTHDF1 binding has been reported to promote enhanced mRNA translation, but has no measurable effect on mRNA stability (2). Conversely, YTHDF2 binding appears to promote mRNA degradation, but has minimal effect on translation efficiency (3). The function of YTHDF3 is less clear, but it has been proposed to function as an auxiliary protein for both YTHDF1 and YTHDF2, helping to promote either increased mRNA translation or decay, respectively (4). Additional studies offer a different viewpoint, suggesting that all three YTHDF proteins initiate mRNA degradation (5), or mediate increased mRNA stability and protein expression (6), promoting the idea that these proteins may carry out similar rather than distinct functions.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Pitrilysin metalloproteinase 1 (PITRM1 or PreP) is a mitochondria-enriched presequence peptidase that processes the mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) of proteins imported across the inner mitochondrial membrane (1). Mitochondria normally function to regulate many cellular processes such as energy production and apoptosis, and its dysfunction may contribute indirectly or directly to human neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease (2, 3; AD and PD, respectively). Interestingly, Aβ, the pathological hallmark of AD, accumulates in mitochondria and inhibits Cym1, the PITRM1 yeast ortholog, leading to impaired MTS processing and accumulation of unprocessed mitochondrial proteins, suggesting an indirect role of Aβ and mitochondrial dysfunction via PITRM1 (4). In addition to biochemical association of PITRM1 with Aβ-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction, human genetics suggest a more direct link as PITRM1 genetic variants have been associated with AD (5, 6). The specific mechanism is currently poorly understood, but may involve impairment of PITRM1-dependent degradation of Aβ, directly resulting in pathological accumulation of Aβ in mitochondria (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Malic enzymes catalyze oxidative decarboxylation of malate to pyruvate (1). The malic enzyme family in mammalian cells includes the cytosolic malic enzyme 1 (ME1) and two mitochondrial malic enzymes (ME2 and ME3) (1, 2). ME1 and ME2 are critical for tumor cell growth and their expression is repressed by tumor suppressor p53 (2). Reduced expression of ME1 and ME2 reciprocally increases the levels and activation of p53, promoting p53-mediated senescence (2). Research studies show ME3 is essential for the survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma following genomic deletion of ME2 (3). Deletion of ME3 is lethal to ME2-null cancer cells, which has been suggested to provide a potential therapeutic opportunity using collateral lethality (3, 4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing protein 4 (CMTM4) is a member of the chemokine-like factor (CKLF)-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing family (1). CMTM4 acts as a tumor suppressor in various malignancies, and regulates cell growth and transition through the cell cycle in HeLa cells (1-4). CMTM4 plays an important role in angiogenesis, enabling internalization of membrane-bound vascular endothelial cadherin at adherens junctions, mediating endothelial barrier function, and controlling vascular sprouting (5). In the immune system, CMTM4 acts as a backup for CMTM6 to regulate plasma membrane expression of PD-L1, an immune inhibitory ligand critical for immune tolerance to self and anti-tumor immunity (6-8). CMTM4 may also protect PD-L1 from being polyubiquitinated and targeted for degradation (8). Due to the roles of CMTM4 in the immune system and as a tumor suppressor, it is being investigated as a therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces. Tight junctions are composed of claudin and occludin proteins, which join the junctions to the cytoskeleton (1,2). The claudin family is composed of 23 integral membrane proteins, and their expression, which varies among tissue types, may determine both the strength and properties of the epithelial barrier. Alteration in claudin protein expression pattern is associated with several types of cancer (2,3). Claudin-1 is expressed primarily in keratinocytes (4) and normal mammary epithelial cells, but is absent or reduced in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: B-lymphocyte antigen CD20 (also known as MS4A1; Membrane-spanning 4-domains subfamily A member 1) is a cell surface phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of B cell activation and proliferation (1,2). It is commonly used as a marker to identify B cells and is expressed throughout B cell development, up until their differentiation into plasma cells. CD20 has no known ligand, and its expression and function are largely conserved between human and mouse (1-3). Evidence suggests that CD20 is necessary for store operated calcium (SOC) entry, which leads to elevated cytoplasmic calcium levels required for B cell activation (4-5). Anti-CD20 antibody immunotherapy depletes B cells by activation of the innate monocytic network and is a common treatment for B cell lymphomas, leukemias, and autoimmune diseases (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Aquaporins (AQP) are integral membrane proteins that serve as channels in the transfer of water and small solutes across the membrane. There are 13 isoforms of AQP that express in different types of cells and tissues (1,2). AQP1 is found in blood vessels, kidney, eye, and ear. AQP2 is found in the kidney, and it has been shown that the lack of AQP2 results in diabetes (1,3). AQP4 is present in the brain, where it is enriched in astrocytes (1,2,4). AQP5 is found in the salivary and lacrimal gland, AQP6 in intracellular vesicles in the kidney, AQP7 in adipocytes, AQP8 in kidney, testis, and liver, AQP9 is present in liver and leukocytes and AQP10-11 in the intestine (1,3,4). AQPs are essential for the function of cells and organs. It has been shown that AQP1 and AQP4 regulate the water homeostasis in astrocytes, preventing cerebral edema caused by solute imbalance (5). Several studies have shown the involvement of AQPs in the development of inflammatory processes, including cells of innate and adaptive immunity (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is an interferon-inducible protein containing an amino-terminal pyrin domain and carboxy-terminal HIN-200 domain that functions in innate immunity and tumor progression (1). Expression of AIM2 can inhibit cell growth and tumor formation (2,3). Furthermore, the AIM2 gene has a high frequency of mutations associated with microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancers (4). AIM2 has a critical role in the activation of caspase-1, the protease responsible for the processing of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. Caspase-1 activation is regulated by multi-protein complexes referred to as “inflammasomes” (5,6). Distinct inflammasome complexes have been described containing NLRP1/NALP1, NLRP3/NALP3, IPAF, and AIM2. The HIN-200 domain of AIM2 is responsible for binding to cytoplasmic double stranded DNA, resulting in caspase-1 activation. (7-9). This inflammasome complex also involves binding of the pyrin domain of AIM2 to the CARD-domain protein ASC/TMS1, which then interacts directly with caspase-1. As a result, AIM2 has been demonstrated to be an important sensor for a number of different pathogens (10-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The zinc finger protein ZPR1 (ZNF259) binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and is localized to both cytoplasm and nucleus. The zinc fingers found in ZPR1 and the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR mediate the interaction between ZPR1 and the receptor (1). ZPR1 translocates from the cytoplasm to nucleus following mitogen (i.e. EGF) stimulation (2,3). ZPR1 also interacts with translation elongation factor eEF1A in vivo following EGF treatment (3). The interaction between the zinc finger protein and elongation factor is important for cell proliferation. Cells lacking ZPR1 exhibit abnormal nucleolar function, suggesting that ZPR1 is required for cell viability and nucleolar function in dividing cells (3). ZPR1 knockout mice exhibit significant neurodegeneration, and reduced or altered expression of ZPR1 may contribute to spinal muscular atrophy, a disorder characterized by degeneration of spinal cord neurons (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YTH domain-containing protein 1 (YTHDC1) and YTH domain-containing protein 2 (YTHDC2) both belong to a family of proteins that bind to RNA. YTHDC1 and YTHDC2 both recognize and bind to N6-methyladenosine(m6A)-containing RNAs; binding is mediated through the YTH domains (1-3). m6A is a modification that is present at internal sites of mRNAs and some non-coding RNAs and plays a role in regulating mRNA splicing, processing, and stability. YTHDC1, also known as splicing factor YT521, regulates alternative splicing by functioning as a key regulator of exon-inclusion or exon-skipping. YTHDC1 promotes exon-inclusion by recruiting pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF3 to regions containing m6A, while repressing exon-skipping by blocking SRSF10 binding to these same regions (2). Increased expression of YTHDC1 promotes malignant endometrial carcinoma (EC) through alternative splicing of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), resulting in an increase in VEGF-165 isoform and increased EC cell invasion (4). YTHDC2 functions to enhance the translation efficiency of target mRNAs and may play a role in spermatogenesis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Following protein synthesis, secretory, intra-organellar, and transmembrane proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. The accumulation of unfolded proteins within the ER triggers an adaptive mechanism known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) that counteracts compromised protein folding (1). The transmembrane serine/threonine kinase IRE1, originally identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a proximal sensor for the UPR that transmits the unfolded protein signal across the ER membrane (2-4). The human homolog IRE1α was later identified and is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues (5). Upon activation of the unfolded protein response, IRE1α splices X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) mRNA through an unconventional mechanism using its endoribonuclease activity (6). This reaction converts XBP-1 from an unspliced XBP-1u isoform to the spliced XBP-1s isoform, which is a potent transcriptional activator that induces expression of many UPR responsive genes (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TREX1 is a broadly expressed 3’ to 5’ exonuclease that acts on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to negatively regulate the interferon-stimulatory DNA (ISD) response (1-4). In humans, there are three TREX1 isoforms generated through alternative splicing with predicted molecular weights of 32, 33, and 39 kDa (2). The transcript for the 33 kDa isoform is the most abundant (2). Mice deficient in TREX1 accumulate intracellular ssDNA, which triggers the ISD response and eventually lethal autoimmunity (3,4). Mutations in TREX1 are associated with autoimmune diseases including Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus (5,6). In addition, TREX1 prevents the cell-intrinsic innate immune response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by digesting excess HIV DNA that would normally trigger induction of type I interferon (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM1) protein is an innate immune receptor that is primarily expressed on the cell surface of myeloid cells (1). TREM1 is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein that consists of an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. TREM1, like its related protein TREM2, interacts with the tyrosine kinase-binding protein DAP12 to form a receptor-signaling complex (2). By accepting a diverse array of ligands, TREM1-expressing macrophages and neutrophils modulate inflammation through cytokine, chemokine, and receptor upregulation (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a multi-subunit protein channel that spans the nuclear envelope and is responsible for the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of RNA, proteins, and ribonucleoproteins (1,2). Nucleoporin 153 kDa (NUP153) protein functions as a scaffolding element that recruits other proteins to form the “nuclear basket” on the nuclear side of the pore complex. NUP153 is essential for normal nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins and mRNAs and is critical for the quality control and retention of unspliced mRNAs in the nucleus (1,2). NUP153 is a potential DNA-binding subunit of the NPC and is important for proper regulation of embryonic stem cell pluripotency and differentiation (1,3). Depletion of NUP153 leads to derepression of developmental genes and induction of early differentiation. NUP153 binds to Nucleoporin-Associated Regions (NARs) that are found near the transcriptional start sites of developmental genes and mediates recruitment of Polycomb Repressor Complex 1 (PRC1) to repress transcription in embryonic stem cells (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: NeuroD is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors. These proteins function by forming heterodimers with E-proteins and binding to the canonical E-box sequence CANNTG (1,2). Neuronal activity results in CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of NeuroD at Ser336, which is necessary for formation and growth of dendrites (3,4). NeuroD is also phosphorylated at Ser274 though the results are context dependent as phosphorylation by Erk stimulates NeuroD activity in pancreatic β-cells while phosphorylation by GSK-3β inhibits NeuroD in neurons (3). NeuroD is crucially important in both the pancreas and developing nervous system, and plays a large role in the development of the inner ear and mammalian retina (3). Mice lacking NeuroD become severely diabetic and die shortly after birth due to defects in β-cell differentiation (2,3,5,6). The lack of NeuroD in the brain results in severe defects in development (5). Human mutations have been linked to a number of types of diabetes including type I diabetes mellitus and maturity-onset diabetes of the young (1,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are a family of more than 100 proteins whose normal expression is largely restricted to immune privileged germ cells of the testis, ovary, and trophoblast cells of the placenta. Although most normal somatic tissues are void of CTA expression, due to epigenetic silencing of gene expression, their expression is upregulated in a wide variety of human solid and liquid tumors (1,2). As such, CTAs have garnered much attention as attractive targets for a variety of immunotherapy-based approaches to selectively attack tumors (3).