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Product listing: Basic FGF Antibody, UniProt ID P09038 #20102 to PRDM14 (E2J8Q) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q9GZV8 #59325

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors are a family of broad-spectrum growth factors influencing a plethora of cellular activities. The interaction of at least 23 ligands, 4 receptors and multiple coreceptors provides a dramatic complexity to a signaling system capable of effecting a multitude of responses (1,2). Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF2), initially identified as a mitogen with prominent angiogenic properties, is now recognized as a multifunctional growth factor (3). It is clear that bFGF produces its biological effects in target cells by signaling through cell-surface FGF receptors. bFGF binds to all four FGF receptors. Ligand binding induces receptor dimerization and autophosphorylation, allowing binding and activation of cytoplasmic downstream target proteins, including FRS-2, PLC and Crk (4,5). The FGF signaling pathway appears to play a significant role not only in normal cell growth regulation but also in tumor development and progression (6).Acidic FGF (aFGF or FGF1) is another extensively investigated protein of the FGF family. aFGF shares 55% DNA sequence homology with bFGF. These two growth factors are ubiquitously expressed and exhibit a wide spectrum of similiar biological activities with quantitative differences likely due to variation in receptor affinity or binding (7).

$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: ADAP (adhesion and degranulation-promoting adaptor protein/SLAP-130/Fyb) is an SH3 domain-containing adaptor protein expressed by T cells, NK cells, and myeloid cells (1,2). There are two isoforms of ADAP with predicted molecular weights of 85 kDa and 90 kDa, but observed molecular weights of 120 kDa and 130 kDa (1-3). ADAP was identified as an adaptor protein that interacts with SLP-76 following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and was subsequently found to be important for several aspects of T cell activation (1,2). For example, ADAP is required for integrin-dependent clustering, signaling, and adhesion (4,5). In addition, ADAP interacts with CARMA1 and facilitates assembly of the CARMA1-Bcl10-MALT1 complex important for NF-κB activation downstream of TCR activation (6). Finally, following binding of a T cell to an antigen presenting cell, ADAP forms a ring at the immunological synapse that recruits dynein to enable microtubule-organizing center polarization (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins are membrane-residing transporters that transport substrates across the membrane in an ATP-dependent manner. ABC substrates subject to active transport across the membrane include ions, amino acids, lipids, and sterols (1). ATP-Binding cassette sub-family A member 7 (ABCA7) is a member of the ABC family and functions to regulate phospholipid and cholesterol homeostasis in central nervous system (CNS) as well as peripheral tissue. ABCA7, like most ABC transporters, contains two transmembrane domain bundles composed of six membrane-spanning helices and two nucleotide-binding domains. ABCA7 and its closest homolog, ABCA1, are 12A class members of ABCs and both proteins function to transport cholesterol and phospholipids in an apolipoprotein A (apoA) – dependent manner (2, 3). ABCA7 is expressed in a variety of tissue and exhibits neuronal and microglial enrichment in the CNS (4). Human genetic studies identified ABCA7 gene variants, including loss-of-function mutations, that associate with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (5). ABCA7 dysfunction may contribute directly to AD pathogenesis by accelerating amyloid-β (Aβ) production and/or altering microglia-dependent phagocytosis of the Aβ (4, 6, 7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Adaptor associated kinase 1 (AAK1) is a member of the Ark1/Prk1 family of serine/threonine kinases (1). AAK1 is enriched in synaptosomal preparations and modulates clathrin-dependent endocytosis, a process that is important in synaptic vesicle recycling and receptor-mediated endocytosis. AAK1, together with clathrin, and clathrin-adaptor protein, AP-2, forms a signaling complex at the cell membrane. AAK1-dependent phosphorylation of the mu-2 subunit of AP-2 enhances efficiency of endocytosis (2, 3). AAK1 is known to promote neurogulin/ErbB4 internalization to regulate neurotrophic signaling. Inhibition of AAK1 activity promotes cell surface expression of neuregulin/Erb4, cell-bound neurotrophic factors that is implicated in brain development and synaptic plasticity (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The adducins (ADD) are cytoskeleton-associated proteins that help cap the ends of actin filaments, promote association between spectrin and actin, and participate in synapse assembly. The three closely related genes ADD1, ADD2, and ADD3 encode the α-adducin, β-adducin, and γ-adducin proteins (1). Research studies indicate that β-adducin is found at high levels in brain and hematopoietic tissues, whereas both α-adducin and γ-adducin are ubiquitously expressed (2). Adducin protein function is regulated by phosphorylation at a number of sites. Both PKA and PKC can phosphorylate α-adducin at Ser726 and β-adducin at Ser713, which inhibits calmodulin binding and adducin activity (3-5). Additionally, PKA (but not PKC) can phosphorylate β-adducin at Ser408, Ser436, and Ser481, which negatively affects spectrin-actin interactions (3). Phosphorylation of α-adducin at Thr445 and Thr480 by Rho-kinase regulates cell motility and membrane ruffling (6). Finally, CDK-1 phosphorylation of α-adducin at Ser12 and Ser355 during mitosis leads to association of α-adducin with the mitotic spindle, suggesting that α-adducin may play a role in mitotic regulation (7). Because α-adducin plays a role in regulating renal sodium reabsorption, it is not surprising that a number of studies show a relationship between ADD1 genetic polymorphisms and the development of hypertension (8-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Following protein synthesis, secretory, intra-organellar, and transmembrane proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. The accumulation of unfolded proteins within the ER triggers an adaptive mechanism known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) that counteracts compromised protein folding (1). The transmembrane serine/threonine kinase IRE1, originally identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a proximal sensor for the UPR that transmits the unfolded protein signal across the ER membrane (2-4). The human homolog IRE1α was later identified and is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues (5). Upon activation of the unfolded protein response, IRE1α splices X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) mRNA through an unconventional mechanism using its endoribonuclease activity (6). This reaction converts XBP-1 from an unspliced XBP-1u isoform to the spliced XBP-1s isoform, which is a potent transcriptional activator that induces expression of many UPR responsive genes (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methyltransferase-like protein 3 (METTL3) and methytransferase-like protein 14 (METTL14) are the two catalytic subunits of an N6-methyltransferase complex that methylates adenosine residues in RNA (1). Methylation of adenosine residues regulates mRNA splicing, processing, translation efficiency, editing and stability, in addition to regulating primary miRNA processing, and is critical for proper regulation of the circadian clock, embryonic stem cell self-renewal, immune tolerance, response to various stimuli, meiosis and mouse fertility (2,3). In this complex, METTL3 functions as the catalytic methyltransferase subunit and METTL14 functions as the target recognition subunit by binding to RNA (4). In addition, the Wilms tumor 1-associated protein (WTAP) functions as a regulatory subunit and is required for accumulation of the complex to nuclear speckles, which are sites of RNA processing (5). Several studies suggest a role for this complex in cancer. METTL3 expression is elevated in lung adenocarcinoma where it promotes growth, survival and invasion of human lung cancer cells (6). In addition, WTAP is over-expressed in a number of different cancers and positively regulates cell migration and invasion in glioblastoma and cholangiocarcinoma (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vesicle transport through interaction with t-SNAREs homolog 1 (Vti1) has two protein members, Vti1a and Vti1b. Human Vti1 was first identified as a homolog of the yeast v-SNARE Vti1p and was able to functionally rescue the phenotype of Vti1p-deficient yeast (1). The mammalian proteins Vti1a and Vti1b exhibit distinct but overlapping localization. Vti1a and Vti1b are both localized in the trans-Golgi network, with Vti1a also found in the Golgi apparatus and Vti1b in endosomes (2). Vti1 proteins have been implicated in a number of protein-protein interactions with partners such as VAMP4, syntaxin 6, syntaxin 8, syntaxin 16, and synaptobrevin (2-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR3) is a 195 kDa membrane receptor tyrosine kinase. VEGF receptors are characterized by the presence of seven extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains followed by a membrane-spanning domain and a conserved intracellular tyrosine kinase domain (1). VEGF receptor 3 expression is largely restricted to adult lymphatic endothelium and is thought to control lymphangiogenesis (1,2). Binding of VEGF-C/VEGF-D to VEGFR3 results in transphosphorylation of tyrosine residues in its intracellular domain, recruitment of signaling molecules and activation of ERK1/2 and Akt signaling cascades (1,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor (VEGFR-1, Flt-1) is a 180 kDa receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the VEGFR (Flt) family (1-3). The receptor is comprised of seven extracellular Ig-like domains, a single transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail containing the active kinase domain (1,2). VEGFR-1 plays an important role in endothelial cell function and normal vascular development, as well as in hematopoietic function (2,3). VEGF-A is a high affinity ligand of VEGFR-1. VEGFR-1 also binds VEGF-B and PLGF (2). Ligand binding results in very little VEGFR-1 kinase activation, and VEGFR-1/VEGF-A binding negatively regulates VEGF function by diverting the growth factor from other functional VEGF receptors (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Twinfilin is an actin monomer-binding protein found in all eukaryotes (1). Mammals have three isoforms. Twinfilin-1 and twinfilin-2a are expressed in most non-muscle cell types, whereas twinfilin-2b is the main isoform in adult heart and skeletal muscle (2). Twinfilins are composed of two ADF-homology domains connected by a 30 kDa linker region. All twinfilins have been shown to form a 1:1 complex with G-actin, but not F-actin (reviewed in 3). Twinfilin-1 was originally known as A6 protein tyrosine kinase and thought to be part of a novel class of protein kinases. However, the protein was renamed after further studies showed no evidence of tyrosine kinase activity (4). Twinfilin-1 helps to prevent the actin filament assembly by forming a complex with actin monomers and, in mammals, has been shown to cap the filament barbed ends. It has been suggested that this regulates cell motility (5). Suppression of twinfilin-1 has also been shown to slow lymphoma cell migration to lymph nodes (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tryptase is the most abundant neutral serine protease expressed in the secretory granules of all human mast cells (1). Tryptase is secreted upon the coupled activation-degranulation response of mast cells in peripheral tissues to physical factors such as trauma, toxins, venoms, endogenous mediators, and immune mechanisms (IgE-dependent and IgE-independent) (2). Tryptase has distinct enzymatic functions that depend on the monomeric or homotetrameric state of this protein, the pH of the environment, and the presence or absence of heparin (3-5). Tryptase has the ability to cleave extracellular substrates such as vasoactive intestinal peptide (6), calcitonin gene-related peptide (7), fibronectin (8), fibrinogen (3), and kininogens (9). Tryptase is also a potent growth factor for epithelial cells, airway smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts (10-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Thymidine kinases play a critical role in generating the DNA synthetic precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) by catalyzing the phosphotransfer of phosphate from ATP to deoxythymidine (dT) and thymidine (T) in the cell. There are two known thymidine kinases, cytoplasmic thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) and mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) (1,2). Unlike TK2, which is not modulated by the cell cycle, TK1 expression and activity is regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, accumulating during G1-phase to peak levels in S-phase before being degraded prior to cell division (3,4). Stability, but not activity, may be regulated via phosphorylation of TK1 at Ser13 by Cdc2 and/or Cdk2, but the precise mode of regulation remains elusive (5). These observations indicate that TK1 might be a useful marker of cell proliferation; however, recent studies have shown that TK1 plays a more significant role in the DNA damage response (6). Genotoxic stress promotes increased TK1 expression and kinase activity resulting in reduced cellular apoptosis and enhanced DNA repair efficiency (6). More importantly, numerous studies show that TK1 expression and activity are upregulated during neoplasia and disease progression in humans, and increased serum levels of TK1 correlate with poor prognosis and decreased survival in patients with various types of advanced tumors (7-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: THEX1 (3’hExo) is a 3’ exonuclease that may play a role in the degradation of histone mRNA transcripts (1). A recently identified member of the DEDDh 3' exonuclease family, THEX1 binds the conserved stem-loop structure found at the 3’ end of mRNA in vitro (2). The binding of THEX1 to mRNA requires the presence of a terminal ACCCA sequence and is enhanced by the concurrent binding of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP). Cleavage of histone mRNA by THEX1 exonuclease may help produce the rapid turnover of histone mRNA transcripts associated with the completion of DNA replication (3). Additional evidence suggests that THEX1 may be responsible for excising the remaining few 3’ nucleotides following cleavage by a different enzyme (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: THEX1 (3’hExo) is a 3’ exonuclease that may play a role in the degradation of histone mRNA transcripts (1). A recently identified member of the DEDDh 3' exonuclease family, THEX1 binds the conserved stem-loop structure found at the 3’ end of mRNA in vitro (2). The binding of THEX1 to mRNA requires the presence of a terminal ACCCA sequence and is enhanced by the concurrent binding of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP). Cleavage of histone mRNA by THEX1 exonuclease may help produce the rapid turnover of histone mRNA transcripts associated with the completion of DNA replication (3). Additional evidence suggests that THEX1 may be responsible for excising the remaining few 3’ nucleotides following cleavage by a different enzyme (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TAZ is a transcriptional co-activator with a PDZ-binding motif that is regulated by its interaction with 14-3-3 proteins (1). TAZ shares homology with the WW domain of Yes-associated protein (YAP) (1). TAZ is proposed to modulate the switch between proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) via interaction with transcription factors Runx2 and PPARγ. This process is critical to normal tissue development and the prevention of tumor formation. Due to its role in determination of MSC fate, TAZ may have clinical relevance to several human diseases caused by an imbalance of MSC differentiation (2,3). TAZ is negatively regulated via phosphorylation by LATS1/2, core kinases in the Hippo signaling pathway that controls stem cell development, tissue growth and tumor development (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SWAP70 is a Rac family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) (1). It is highly expressed by activated B cells. Following B cell stimulation, SWAP70 has been observed to translocate from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where it plays a role in class switching, as well as to the membrane, where it associates with the B cell receptor (2,3). SWAP70 also plays a role in migration of B cells and other immune cell types including dendritic cells, eosinophils, and mast cells (4-7). Mice deficient in both SWAP70 and a related protein, DEF6, develop lupus-like autoimmunity due to misregulation of IRF4 in B cells and T cells leading to increased IL21 production and responsiveness (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The SS18-SSX fusion proteins are a result of in-frame fusions that fuse the SS18 gene on chromosome 18 with X chromosome genes SSX1, SSX2, and to a lesser extent SSX4 (1). Human synovial sarcoma (SS) accounts for 8-10% of all soft tissue malignancies and 95% of these malignancies express the recurrent translocation of the SS18 gene on chromosome 18 (1). The N-terminal SNH domain (SYT N-terminal homology domain) of the SS18 protein interacts with SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes via the N terminal region of BRM and BRG1 subunits (2). Studies of the SS18-SSX fusion in SS suggest that endogenous SS18 competes with the mutant SS18-SSX fusion for occupancy in the SWI/SNF complexes resulting in the displacement of the SNF5 (BAF47) subunit. Displacement of the SNF5 subunit results in altered function of the SWI/SNF complex that leads to deregulated expression of genes such as Sox2 in SS (1).While the SSX family of proteins is well characterized in SS, little is known outside of this context. The conserved N-terminus of the SSX family contains a KRAB domain which seems to function as a transcriptional repressor (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SLAMF6 (CD352/NTB-A) is a type-I transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of immunomodulatory receptors. Like other members of the SLAM receptor family, SLAMF6 contains Ig-like domains within its extracellular region and conserved tyrosine-based signaling motifs within its intracellular domain that, when phosphorylated, bind to the SAP and EAT-2 signaling adaptors (1). SLAMF6 is expressed on the surface of multiple types of immune cells, such as those of the B, T, and NK lineages. Its activation is triggered by homotypic interactions involving its extracellular domain (1-3). Indeed, research studies have shown that in T-cells, SLAMF6 engagement facilitates activation and cytokine production (4). Similarly, homotypic ligand-mediated engagement of SLAMF6 on NK cells activates signaling cascades that drive proliferation, cytotoxicity, and cytokine production (1,5-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The mTORC1 kinase complex is a critical regulator of cell growth (1,2). Its activity is modulated by enviromental factors such as energy levels, growth factors, and amino acids (3, 4). The GTPases RagA, RagB, RagC, and RagD mediate amino acid signaling to activate mTORC1 (1, 2). SH3BP4 (SH3 domain-binding protein 4) binds to the inactive Rag GTPase complex during amino acid starvation and prevents the association of Rag GTPase complex with mTORC1 resulting in the suppression of mTORC1 activation and cell growth (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Special AT-rich binding protein 2 (SATB2) is a close homolog to SATB1 that functions as a transcription factor. It binds to nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARS); regulatory DNA sequences important for chromatin structure. SATB2 was initially identified when bound to the MARS of the immunoglobulin μ gene in pre-B cells, enhancing its expression (1). SATB2 plays a role in osteoblast differentiation by repressing the HoxA2 gene and enhancing the activity of Runx2 and ATF4 (2). SATB2 also plays a role in the developing cerebral cortex by changing chromatin structure surrounding the Ctip2 regulatory regions (3). In erythroid cells, SATB2 activates the γ-globin locus by recruiting PCAF and reordering the chromatin structure (4). Downregulation of SATB2 is linked to colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous carcinomas (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ras association domain-containing protein 1 (RASSF1) is a member of the RASSF protein family (RASSF1-10), scaffold proteins whose members are unified by the presence of a Ras association (RA) domain that gives them structural similarity to Ras effector proteins (1). The RASSF1 gene is located in a genomic region exhibiting loss of heterozygosity in a more than 90% of small cell lung cancers, and up to 50% of non-small cell lung cancers (2), strongly implicating the RASSF1 gene as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, RASSF1 expression in tumor cells has been shown to be frequently suppressed by promoter hypermethylation, further suggesting a tumor suppressor function (3-5). Although multiple isoforms (RASSF1A-H) have been described, generated by alternative splicing and/or promoter usage, RASSF1A and RASSF1C appear to be the most widely expressed in normal tissues, with RASSF1A expression lost most frequently in tumor cells (6). Notably, RASSF1A has been identified as an effector protein in the Hippo signaling pathway, where it promotes association between MST1/2 and LATS1/2, leading to suppressive phosphorylation of the transcriptional co-activators YAP and TAZ (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Retinoids (vitamin A and its active retinoic acid derivatives) are non-steroid hormones that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Retinoic acid receptors (RARalpha, -beta and -gamma) and retinoid X receptors (RXRalpha, -beta and -gamma) are nuclear receptors that function as RAR-RXR heterodimers or RXR homodimers (1-2). In response to retinoid binding, these dimers control gene expression by binding to specific retinoic acid response elements, by recruiting cofactors and the transcriptional machinery, and by indirectly regulating chromatin structure. Finally, ligand binding and phosphorylation of RARalpha by JNK at Thr181, Ser445 and Ser461 controls the stability of RAR-RXR through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (3-4). At least four distinct genetic lesions affect RARalpha and result in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The t(15;17) translocation that results in the PML-RARalpha fusion protein is responsible for more than 99% of APL cases, and the fusion protein inhibits PML-dependent apoptotic pathways in a dominant negative fashion. In addition PML-RARalpha inhibits transcription of retinoic acid target genes by recruiting co-repressors, attenuating myeloid differentiation (5-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Poliovirus Receptor-Related Immunoglobulin Domain-Containing Protein (PVRIG; also known as CD112 receptor) is a multiple transmembrane protein expressed on the surface of T cells and NK cells, predominantly on memory and effector CD8+ T cells. PVRIG expression is upregulated after in vitro T cell activation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. PVRIG competes with DNAM-1/CD226 for interaction with the receptor ligand Nectin-2. Upon ligation of PVRIG and Nectin-2, T cell proliferation is inhibited, suggesting PVRIG is a co-inhibitory receptor that dampens T cell functions (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PR domain zinc finger protein 14 (PRDM14) is a likely protein lysine methyltransferase that is primarily expressed in primordial germ cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells. It is essential for the establishment and maintenance of primordial germ cells and critical for the maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (1-3). PRDM14 represses genes involved in the differentiation of stem cells into various cell lineages, likely via a combination of interactions with TET proteins, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and CBFA2T2 (3-8). In addition, overexpression of PRDM14 in combination with Jarid2 promotes induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) formation (9). PRDM14 protein levels are overexpressed in certain cancers, including breast, leukemia (T-ALL), and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (10-13), and PRDM14 overexpression may serve as a novel prognostic marker in NSCLC (14). Targeting PRDM14 overexpression with a siRNA-based therapy was shown to decrease liver metastasis in a murine pancreatic cancer model, suggesting potential as a therapeutic option for cancers where this protein is abnormally expressed (15).