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Product listing: PTMScan® Multi-Pathway Enrichment Kit #75676 to Anti-mouse IgG (H+L), F(ab')2 Fragment (Alexa Fluor® 555 Conjugate) #4409

PTMScan® Technology employs a proprietary methodology from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) for peptide enrichment by immunoprecipitation using a specific bead-conjugated antibody in conjunction with liquid chromatography (LC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for quantitative profiling of post-translational modification (PTM) sites in cellular proteins. These include phosphorylation (PhosphoScan®), ubiquitination (UbiScan®), acetylation (AcetylScan®), and methylation (MethylScan®), among others. PTMScan® Technology enables researchers to isolate, identify, and quantitate large numbers of post-translationally modified cellular peptides with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, providing a global overview of PTMs in cell and tissue samples without preconceived biases about where these modified sites occur. For more information on PTMScan® Proteomics Services, please visit www.cellsignal.com/common/content/content.jsp?id=ptmscan-services.
The Wnt/β-Catenin Activated Targets Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate target proteins of the Wnt/β-Catenin signaling pathway. This kit contains enough primary antibody to perform two western blots per primary.
The Smad1/5/9 Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting target proteins of the BMP signaling pathway. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blots with each primary antibody.
$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human and mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-CREB (Ser133) (87G3) Rabbit mAb #9198.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).

$80
100 µl
$162
500 µl
Anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) was conjugated to DyLight™ 800 4X PEG fluorescent dye under optimal conditions and formulated at 1 mg/ml. Excitation is 777 nm and peak fluorescence emission is 794 nm.

Background: Near infrared anti-species IgG conjugates are ideal for fluorescent western blotting and In-Cell Western. Cell Signaling Technology's strict quality control procedures assure that each conjugate provides optimal specificity and fluorescence.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Secretory and transmembrane proteins are synthesized on polysomes and translocated into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Inside the ER, these proteins are often modified by disulfide bond formation, amino-linked glycosylation and folding. To help proteins fold properly, the ER contains a pool of molecular chaperones including BiP. BiP was identified as an immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein in pre-B cells (1,2). It was also found to be induced at the protein level by glucose starvation (3). When protein folding is disturbed inside ER, BiP synthesis is increased. Subsequently, BiP binds to misfolded proteins to prevent them from forming aggregates and assists in proper refolding (4).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 8 (CD8) is a disulphide-linked heterodimer consisting of the unrelated α and β subunits. Each subunit is a glycoprotein composed of a single extracellular Ig-like domain, a polypeptide linker, a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. On T cells, CD8 is the coreceptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the Ig-like domain of CD8α interacts with the α3-domain of the MHC class I molecule. CD8 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell, and the α chain recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cytochrome c is a well conserved electron-transport protein and is part of the respiratory chain localized to mitochondrial intermembrane space (1). Upon apoptotic stimulation, cytochrome c released from mitochondria associates with procaspase-9 (47 kDa)/Apaf 1. This complex processes caspase-9 from inactive proenzyme to its active form (2). This event further triggers caspase-3 activation and eventually leads to apoptosis (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair (1). Activation of ATM by autophosphorylation on Ser1981 occurs in response to exposed DNA double stranded breaks. ATM kinase regulates a number of proteins involved in cell cycle checkpoint control, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Known substrates include p53, Chk2, Chk1, CtIP, 4E-BP1, BRCA1, RPA3, H2A.X, SMC1, FANCD2, Rad17, Artemis, Nbs1, and the I-2 regulatory subunit of PP1 (1,2). Mutations in the corresponding ATM gene result in ataxia telangiectasia (AT), an autosomal recessive disease characterized by uncoordinated muscle movement and neurodegeneration. Cells from AT patients display defective DNA damage-induced checkpoint activation, sensitivity to radiation, and a higher frequency of chromosome breakage (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

PhosphoPlus® Duets from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) provide a means to assess protein activation status. Each Duet contains an activation-state and total protein antibody to your target of interest. These antibodies have been selected from CST's product offering based upon superior performance in specified applications.

Background: p38 MAP kinase (MAPK), also called RK (1) or CSBP (2), is the mammalian orthologue of the yeast HOG kinase that participates in a signaling cascade controlling cellular responses to cytokines and stress (1-4). Four isoforms of p38 MAPK, p38α, β, γ (also known as Erk6 or SAPK3), and δ (also known as SAPK4) have been identified. Similar to the SAPK/JNK pathway, p38 MAPK is activated by a variety of cellular stresses including osmotic shock, inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV light, and growth factors (1-5). MKK3, MKK6, and SEK activate p38 MAPK by phosphorylation at Thr180 and Tyr182. Activated p38 MAPK has been shown to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAP kinase 2 (3) and to phosphorylate the transcription factors ATF-2 (5), Max (6), and MEF2 (5-8). SB203580 (4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-imidazole) is a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK. This compound inhibits the activation of MAPKAPK-2 by p38 MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (9). SB203580 inhibits p38 MAPK catalytic activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket, but does not inhibit phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by upstream kinases (10).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) (Thr202/Tyr204) (197G2) Rabbit mAb #4377.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a widely conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in many cellular programs, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, and death. The p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) signaling pathway can be activated in response to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli including mitogens, growth factors, and cytokines (1-3), and research investigators consider it an important target in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer (4). Upon stimulation, a sequential three-part protein kinase cascade is initiated, consisting of a MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK or MAP3K), a MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK or MAP2K), and a MAP kinase (MAPK). Multiple p44/42 MAP3Ks have been identified, including members of the Raf family, as well as Mos and Tpl2/COT. MEK1 and MEK2 are the primary MAPKKs in this pathway (5,6). MEK1 and MEK2 activate p44 and p42 through phosphorylation of activation loop residues Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr185/Tyr187, respectively. Several downstream targets of p44/42 have been identified, including p90RSK (7) and the transcription factor Elk-1 (8,9). p44/42 are negatively regulated by a family of dual-specificity (Thr/Tyr) MAPK phosphatases, known as DUSPs or MKPs (10), along with MEK inhibitors, such as U0126 and PD98059.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunofluorescence (Paraffin), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Following protein synthesis, secretory, intra-organellar, and transmembrane proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. The accumulation of unfolded proteins within the ER triggers an adaptive mechanism known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) that counteracts compromised protein folding (1). The transmembrane serine/threonine kinase IRE1, originally identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a proximal sensor for the UPR that transmits the unfolded protein signal across the ER membrane (2-4). The human homolog IRE1α was later identified and is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues (5). Upon activation of the unfolded protein response, IRE1α splices X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) mRNA through an unconventional mechanism using its endoribonuclease activity (6). This reaction converts XBP-1 from an unspliced XBP-1u isoform to the spliced XBP-1s isoform, which is a potent transcriptional activator that induces expression of many UPR responsive genes (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: RBPSUH (Recombining Binding Protein, SUppressor of Hairless), also termed RBP-J or CSL, is the DNA-binding component of the transcription complex regulated by canonical Notch signaling. In the absence of Notch activation, RBPSUH suppresses target gene expression through interactions with a co-repressor complex containing histone deacetylase. Upon activation of Notch receptors, the Notch intracellular domain (NICD) translocates to the nucleus and binds to RBPSUH. This displaces the co-repressor complex and replaces it with a transcription activation complex that includes Mastermind-like (MAML) proteins and histone acetylase p300, leading to transcriptional activation of Notch target genes (1-3). RBPSUH is also the DNA-binding partner for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2), a protein critical for latent viral transcription and immortalization of EBV-infected B cells (4,5).

$303
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized by the covalent reaction of formylbenzamide-modified antibody with hydrazide-activated magnetic bead.Phospho-Tyrosine (P-Tyr-1000) Rabbit mAb (Magnetic Bead Conjugate) is useful for immunoprecipitation assays. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Tyrosine (P-Tyr-1000) MultiMab™ Rabbit mAb mix #8954.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a key role in cellular signaling (1). Research studies have shown that in cancer, unregulated tyrosine kinase activity can drive malignancy and tumor formation by generating inappropriate proliferation and survival signals (2). Antibodies specific for phospho-tyrosine (3,4) have been invaluable reagents in these studies. The phospho-tyrosine monoclonal antibodies developed by Cell Signaling Technology are exceptionally sensitive tools for studying tyrosine phosphorylation and monitoring tyrosine kinase activity in high throughput drug discovery.

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-9 (ICE-LAP6, Mch6) is an important member of the cysteine aspartic acid protease (caspase) family (1,2). Upon apoptotic stimulation, cytochrome c released from mitochondria associates with the 47 kDa procaspase-9/Apaf-1. Apaf-1 mediated activation of caspase-9 involves intrinsic proteolytic processing resulting in cleavage at Asp315 and producing a p35 subunit. Another cleavage occurs at Asp330 producing a p37 subunit that can serve to amplify the apoptotic response (3-6). Cleaved caspase-9 further processes other caspase members, including caspase-3 and caspase-7, to initiate a caspase cascade, which leads to apoptosis (7-10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Pyruvate kinase is a glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. In mammals, the M1 isoform (PKM1) is expressed in most adult tissues (1). The M2 isoform (PKM2) is an alternatively spliced variant of M1 that is expressed during embryonic development (1). Research studies found that cancer cells exclusively express PKM2 (1-3). PKM2 is shown to be essential for aerobic glycolysis in tumors, known as the Warburg effect (1). When cancer cells switch from the M2 isoform to the M1 isoform, aerobic glycolysis is reduced and oxidative phosphorylation is increased (1). These cells also show decreased tumorigenicity in mouse xenografts (1). Recent studies showed that PKM2 is not essential for all tumor cells (4). In the tumor model studied, PKM2 was found to be active in the non-proliferative tumor cell population and inactive in the proliferative tumor cell population (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cyclooxygenase1 (Cox1) and cyclooxygenase2 (Cox2), family members with 60% homology in humans, catalyze prostaglandin production from arachidonic acid (1,2). While Cox1 expression is constitutive in most tissues, Cox2 expression is induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN) (3). PGN activates Ras, leading to phosphorylation of Raf at Ser338 and Erk1/2 at Tyr204. The activation of MAP kinase signaling results in subsequent activation of IKKα/β, phosphorylation of IκBα at Ser32/36, and NF-κB activation. Finally, activation of the transcription factor NF-κB is responsible for the induction of Cox2 expression (4). Investigators have shown that LPS and PGN induce the clinical manifestations of arthritis and bacterial infections, such as inflammation, fever, and septic shock (5). Research studies have indicated that Cox1 and Cox2 may also play a role in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease by potentiating γ-secretase activity and β-amyloid generation (6).

$336
96 assays
1 Kit
The Cyclic GMP XP® Assay Kit is a competition enzyme-linked immunoassay used to determine cGMP levels in cells or tissues of interest. In this assay, cGMP found in test sample competes with a fixed amount of HRP-linked cGMP for binding to an anti-cGMP XP® Rabbit mAb immobilized onto a 96-well plate. Following washing to remove excess sample cGMP and HRP-linked cGMP, HRP substrate TMB is added to develop color. Because of the competitive nature of this assay, the magnitude of the absorbance for this developed color is inversely proportional to the quantity of sample cGMP. Measurement of absorbance using the cGMP Standard allows calculating the absolute amount of cGMP in a sample of interest.Note: 12 8-well modules - Each module is designed to break apart for 8 tests.
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected
Molecular Weight:380.50 g/mol

Background: MEK1 and MEK2, also called MAPK or Erk kinases, are dual-specificity protein kinases that function in a mitogen activated protein kinase cascade controlling cell growth and differentiation (1-3). Activation of MEK1 and MEK2 occurs through phosphorylation of two serine residues at positions 217 and 221, located in the activation loop of subdomain VIII, by Raf-like molecules. MEK1/2 is activated by a wide variety of growth factors and cytokines and also by membrane depolarization and calcium influx (1-4). Constitutively active forms of MEK1/2 are sufficient for the transformation of NIH/3T3 cells or the differentiation of PC-12 cells (4). MEK activates p44 and p42 MAP kinase by phosphorylating both threonine and tyrosine residues at sites located within the activation loop of kinase subdomain VIII.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate and NADH to lactate and NAD+. When the oxygen supply is too low for mitochondrial ATP production, this reaction recycles NADH generated in glycolysis to NAD+, which reenters glycolysis. The major form of LDH found in muscle cells is the A (LDHA) isozyme. The LDHA promoter contains HIF-1α binding sites (1). LDHA expression is induced under hypoxic conditions (2). During intensive and prolonged muscle exercise, lactate accumulates in muscle cells when the supply of oxygen does not meet demand. When oxygen levels return to normal, LDH converts lactate to pyruvate to generate ATP in the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: While overcoming the G1/S checkpoint to commence DNA replication requires cyclin E, and traversing the G2/M checkpoint to initiate mitosis requires cyclin B to be present, cyclin A seems to be required for both S-phase and M-phase (1). A number of studies have described the ability of over-expressed cyclin A to accelerate the G1 to S transition causing DNA replication, and cyclin A antisense DNA can prevent DNA replication (2-4). Cyclin A availability is apparently the rate-limiting step for entry into mitosis, and cyclin A is required for completion of prophase (5). At late prophase, cyclin A may no longer be necessary as cdc2/cyclinB1 becomes active (5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ki-67 (D3B5) Rabbit mAb #9129.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Ki-67, named after the location where it was discovered (Kiel University, Germany), is a nuclear nonhistone protein (1) that is universally expressed among proliferating cells and absent in quiescent cells (2). Ki-67 detects proliferating cells in G1, S, G2, and mitosis, but not in the G0 resting phase. Research studies have shown that high levels of Ki-67 are associated with poorer breast cancer survival (3). Research studies have explored the use of Ki-67, along with other markers, as potential prognostic or predictive markers in breast cancer and other malignant diseases (4).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROCK (Rho-associated kinase), a family of serine/threonine kinases, is an important downstream target of Rho-GTPase and plays an important role in Rho-mediated signaling. Two isoforms of ROCK have been identified: ROCK1 and ROCK2. ROCK is composed of N-terminal catalytic, coiled-coil, and C-terminal PH (pleckstrin homology) domains. The C-terminus of ROCK negatively regulates its kinase activity (1,2). Caspase-3-induced cleavage of ROCK1 and direct cleavage of ROCK2 by granzyme B (grB) activates ROCK and leads to phosphorylation of myosin light chain and inhibition of myosin phosphatase (3). This phosphorylation may account for the mechanism by which Rho regulates cytokinesis, cell motility, cell membrane blebbing during apoptosis, and smooth muscle contraction (4-6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). Histone acetylation occurs mainly on the amino-terminal tail domains of histones H2A (Lys5), H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20), H3 (Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, 36 and 56), and H4 (Lys5, 8, 12, and 16) and is important for the regulation of histone deposition, transcriptional activation, DNA replication, recombination, and DNA repair (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites for a protein module called the bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins contain bromodomains and may be recruited to gene promoters, in part, through binding of acetylated histone tails. Histone acetylation is mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), such as CBP/p300, GCN5L2, PCAF, and Tip60, which are recruited to genes by DNA-bound protein factors to facilitate transcriptional activation (3). Deacetylation, which is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDAC and sirtuin proteins), reverses the effects of acetylation and generally facilitates transcriptional repression (7,8).

$142
250 µl
Anti-Mouse IgG (H+L) F(ab')2 Fragment was conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye under optimal conditions and formulated at 2 mg/ml. This F(ab')2 fragment product results in less non-specific binding, as it lacks the Fc domain that can bind to the cells with Fc receptors.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)