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Product listing: Innate Immunity Activation Antibody Sampler Kit, UniProt ID P01584 #52239 to Phospho-Tau (Thr181) (D9F4G) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P10636-8 #12885

The Innate Immunity Activation Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting the activation of multiple signaling pathways involved in innate immunity using phospho-specific, cleavage-specific, and control antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments.

Background: The innate immune system responds rapidly to pathogens by detecting conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage/danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). There are several families of PRRs. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are transmembrane PRRs and signal through recruitment of adaptor proteins, including MyD88, which leads to recruitment and phosphorylation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, followed by activation of NF-κB and MAP kinases (1-3). Some TLRs also activate IRFs, which upregulate the type I interferon response. Activation of TLR3 and TLR4 results in phosphorylation and activation of IRF-3, while TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 lead to activation of IRF-7 (2, 3). STING is a multi-pass ER transmembrane protein that is activated in response to intracellular DNA downstream of DNA-sensing cytoplasmic PRRs, such as DDX41, or by binding the second messenger cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) produced by cGAS (4-6). Following activation, STING translocates with TBK1 to perinuclear endosomes, leading to phosphorylation and activation of IRF-3 and NF-κB (7, 8). Following activation and translocation, STING gets phosphorylated by ULK1, resulting in STING inactivation and degradation (9). Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic multimeric protein complexes that assemble in response to PAMPs or DAMPs detected by AIM2 or members of the nod-like receptor (NLR) family, such as NLRP3 (10). Inflammasomes activate Caspase-1, which cleaves the IL-1β and IL-18 precursor proteins into the mature forms (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-9 (ICE-LAP6, Mch6) is an important member of the cysteine aspartic acid protease (caspase) family (1,2). Upon apoptotic stimulation, cytochrome c released from mitochondria associates with the 47 kDa procaspase-9/Apaf-1. Apaf-1 mediated activation of caspase-9 involves intrinsic proteolytic processing resulting in cleavage at Asp315 and producing a p35 subunit. Another cleavage occurs at Asp330 producing a p37 subunit that can serve to amplify the apoptotic response (3-6). Cleaved caspase-9 further processes other caspase members, including caspase-3 and caspase-7, to initiate a caspase cascade, which leads to apoptosis (7-10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Wnt family includes several secreted glycoproteins that play important roles in animal development (1). There are 19 Wnt genes in the human genome that encode functionally distinct Wnt proteins (2). Wnt members bind to the Frizzled family of seven-pass transmembrane proteins and activate several signaling pathways (3). The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway also requires a coreceptor from the low-density lipoprotein receptor family (4). Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling pathways is involved in several types of cancers (5).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis induced through the CD95 receptor (Fas/APO-1) and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) activates caspase-8 and leads to the release of the caspase-8 active fragments, p18 and p10 (1-3). Activated caspase-8 cleaves and activates downstream effector caspases such as caspase-1, -3, -6, and -7. Caspase-3 ultimately elicits the morphological hallmarks of apoptosis, including DNA fragmentation and cell shrinkage.

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: Bad is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family that promotes cell death by displacing Bax from binding to Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL (1,2). Survival factors, such as IL-3, inhibit the apoptotic activity of Bad by activating intracellular signaling pathways that result in the phosphorylation of Bad at Ser112 and Ser136 (2). Phosphorylation at these sites promotes binding of Bad to 14-3-3 proteins to prevent an association between Bad with Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL (2). Akt phosphorylates Bad at Ser136 to promote cell survival (3,4). Bad is phosphorylated at Ser112 both in vivo and in vitro by p90RSK (5,6) and mitochondria-anchored PKA (7). Phosphorylation at Ser155 in the BH3 domain by PKA plays a critical role in blocking the dimerization of Bad and Bcl-xL (8-10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The discoidin domain receptors (DDRs) are receptor tyrosine kinases with a discoidin homology repeat in their extracellular domains, activated by binding to extracellular matrix collagens. So far, two mammalian DDRs have been identified: DDR1 and DDR2 (1). They are widely expressed in human tissues and may have roles in smooth muscle cell-mediated collagen remodeling (2). Research studies have implicated aberrant expression and signaling of DDRs in human diseases related to increased matrix degradation and remodeling, such as cardiovascular disease, liver fibrosis, and tumor invasion (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein containing multiple amino-terminal extracellular Ig-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a short carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domain (1). Alternative splicing generates two isoforms of VCAM-1 (2). The role of VCAM-1 during infection and inflammatory diseases is well characterized. Expression of VCAM-1 is induced in endothelial cells by inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β (1). VCAM-1 on endothelial cells interacts with the integrin VLA-4 (α4β1) on leukocytes to mediate migration of circulating leukocytes from the blood across the endothelium and into tissues (3).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis of human cells. The unconjugated antibody, Phospho-4E-BP1 (Thr37/46) (236B4) Rabbit mAb #2855, reacts with Phospho-4E-BP1 (Thr37/46) from human, mouse, rat and monkey. CST expects that phospho-4E-BP1 (Thr37/46) (236B4) Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate) will also recognize Phospho-4E-BP1 in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Translation repressor protein 4E-BP1 (also known as PHAS-1) inhibits cap-dependent translation by binding to the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 disrupts this interaction and results in activation of cap-dependent translation (1). Both the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway and FRAP/mTOR kinase regulate 4E-BP1 activity (2,3). Multiple 4E-BP1 residues are phosphorylated in vivo (4). While phosphorylation by FRAP/mTOR at Thr37 and Thr46 does not prevent the binding of 4E-BP1 to eIF4E, it is thought to prime 4E-BP1 for subsequent phosphorylation at Ser65 and Thr70 (5).

This kit contains reagents to examine the activation state and total protein levels of key components in the noncanonical NF-κB pathway: TRAF2, TRAF3, NIK, IKKα, p100, and RelB.
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as Class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT7, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, is localized primarily in the nucleolus and is most prominently expressed in hematopoietic cells, especially myeloid progenitor cells (2). SirT7 is recruited to chromatin by sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factors such as Elk-4, where it functions to deacetylate Lys18 of histone H3 at gene promoters and facilitate transcriptional repression (3). Interestingly, overexpression of SirT7 induces a global decrease in histone H3 Lys18 acetylation levels, a phenotype that has been associated with poor prognosis in prostate, lung, kidney, and pancreatic cancers in the research literature (3-5). Furthermore, studies have also shown that SirT7 is required for the maintenance of several transformed phenotypes of cancer cells, including anchorage-independent cell growth, growth in low serum conditions, and tumor formation in xenograft assays (3). SirT7 is also required for the E1A-induced decrease in histone H3 Lys18 acetylation, induction of cell-cycle entry, and escape from contact inhibition (3). Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that SirT7 is an important regulator of cellular transformation. Research has shown that the SirT7 gene is located on chromosome 17q25.3, a region that is frequently altered in acute leukemia and lymphoma (2), and SirT7 overexpression and amplification have been detected in multiple types of cancer (6-8).

$122
20 µl
$248
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: Much of the dynamic behavior of cellular proteins, including the regulation of molecular interactions (1), subcellular localization (2), and transcriptional regulation (3) is controlled by a variety of post-translational modifications (4). Antibodies specific for these post-translational modifications are invaluable tools in the quest to understand normal and pathogenic molecular and cellular behavior.General protein modification antibodies are designed to react with modified amino acid residues (e.g. phospho-threonine, phospho-tyrosine, acetyl-lysine, nitro-tyrosine) independently of the sequence in which they are embedded. This ability to recognize modified residues in a "context-independent" fashion gives these antibodies broad reactivities, presumably conferring upon them the ability to react with hundreds of distinct proteins. This broad pattern of reactivity makes these antibodies especially valuable in multiplex analyses and target discovery programs.

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
CST's PathScan® Phospho-NF-KappaB p65 (Ser536) Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of Phospho-NF-KappaB p65 protein. A Phospho-NF-KappaB p65 (Ser 536) Mouse mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, phospho-NF-KappaB p65 protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, NF-KappaB p65 Rabbit mAb is added to detect the captured phospho-NF-KappaB p65 protein. Anti-rabbit IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of optical density for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of phospho-NF-KappaB p65 (Ser536).Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The transcription factor Elk-1 is a component of the ternary complex that binds the serum response element (SRE) and mediates gene activity in response to serum and growth factors (1-3). Elk-1 is phosphorylated by MAP kinase pathways at a cluster of S/T motifs at its carboxy terminus; phosphorylation at these sites, particularly Ser383, is critical for transcriptional activation by Elk-1. Elk-1 appears to be a direct target of activated MAP kinase: (a) biochemical studies indicate that Elk-1 is a good substrate for MAP kinase; (b) the kinetics of Elk-1 phosphorylation and activation correlate with MAP kinase activity; (c) interfering mutants of MAP kinase block Elk-1 activation in vivo. Other studies have shown that Elk-1 (Ser383) is also a target of the stress-activated kinase SAPK/JNK (4,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: MOB1 was first identified in yeast as a protein that binds to Mps with essential roles in the completion of mitosis and the maintenance of ploidy (1). Its Drosophila and mammalian homologs, Mats and MOB1, respectively, are involved in the Hippo signaling tumor suppressor pathway, which plays a critical role in organ size regulation and which has been implicated in cancer development (2-5). There are two MOB1 proteins in humans, MOB1α and MOB1β, that are encoded by two different genes but which have greater than 95% amino acid sequence identity (6). Both forms bind to members of the nuclear Dbf2-related (NDR) kinases, such as LATS1/2 and NDR1/2, thereby stimulating kinase activity (7-9). This binding is promoted by the phosphorylation of MOB1 at several threonine residues by MST1 and/or MST2 (5,10).

The Acetyl-Histone Antibody Sampler Kit provides a fast and economical means of evaluating the acetylation states of histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two Western blot experiments.

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Annexin A2 (ANXA2), also known as lipocortin II or calpactin-1 heavy chain, is a 36 kDa member of the annexin superfamily that binds phospholipids and other proteins in a calcium-dependent manner via annexin repeats (1). Annexin A2 contains four such repeats through which it mediates protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions (1-4). It forms a constitutive heterotetramer with S100A10, acting as a bridge between the actin cytoskeleton, plasma membrane, and endocytotic vesicle machinery (5-7). Originally identified as a protein inhibitor of phospholipase A2, annexin A2 has subsequently been shown to interact with an array of protein and non-protein partners, including F-actin, spectrin, SNARE complexes, RNA, and virus particles (4,6,8,9). Annexin A2 has also been shown to have receptor-like activity and is detected on the surface of macrophages and vascular endothelial cells where it mediates macrophage activation and Factor Xa signaling, respectively (10-13). Upregulation of annexin A2 at the cell surface is thought to be modulated by phosphorylation at Tyr23 by Src (14-18). Interestingly, phosphorylation at Tyr23 has recently been shown to be required for cell surface expression of annexin A2 where it mediates motility, invasiveness, and overall metastatic potential of certain pancreatic cancer cells (19,20). Annexin A2 has also been shown to be heavily phosphorylated on serine residues in response to PKC activation via a pleiotropic mechanism (21-23). For a complete list of curated phosphorylation sites on annexin A2, please see PhosphoSitePlus® at www.phosphosite.org.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) comprise a family of transcription factors that function within the Jak/Stat pathway to regulate interferon (IFN) and IFN-inducible gene expression in response to viral infection (1). IRFs play an important role in pathogen defense, autoimmunity, lymphocyte development, cell growth, and susceptibility to transformation. The IRF family includes nine members: IRF-1, IRF-2, IRF-9/ISGF3γ, IRF-3, IRF-4 (Pip/LSIRF/ICSAT), IRF-5, IRF-6, IRF-7, and IRF-8/ICSBP. All IRF proteins share homology in their amino-terminal DNA-binding domains. IRF family members regulate transcription through interactions with proteins that share similar DNA-binding motifs, such as IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE), IFN consensus sequences (ICS), and IFN regulatory elements (IRF-E) (2).

$260
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized by the covalent reaction of formylbenzamide-modified antibody with hydrazide-activated magnetic bead.PKR (D7F7) Rabbit mAb (Magnetic Bead Conjugate) is useful for immunoprecipitation assays of PKR protein.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein kinase R (PKR) is transcriptionally induced by interferon and activated by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). PKR inhibits translation initiation through phosphorylation of the α subunit of the initiation factor eIF2 (eIF2α) and also controls the activation of several transcription factors, such as NF-κB, p53, and the Stats. In addition, PKR mediates apoptosis induced by many different stimuli, such as LPS, TNF-α, viral infection, and serum starvation (1,2). Activation of PKR by dsRNA results in PKR dimerization and autophosphorylation of Thr446 and Thr451 in the activation loop. Substitution of threonine for alanine at position 451 completely inactivated PKR, while a mutant with a threonine to alanine substitution at position 446 was partially active (3). Research studies have implicated PKR activation in the pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (4,5).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

Calyculin A is a more potent phosphatase inhibitor than Okadaic acid (2). As shown by Western blot, treatment of cells with 100 nM Calyculin A for 30 minutes induces threonine phosphorylation, detected by Phospho-Threonine-Polyclonal Antibody #9381. IC50 values for inhibitory activity against PP1 are approximately 2 nM. IC50 values for inhibitory activity against PP2A are approximately 0.5 -1.0 nM.

Background: Calyculin A inhibits the activity of protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A (1,2). Unlike Okadaic acid, which reduces PP2A activity but has little effect on PP1 activity, Calyculin A inhibits both phosphatases (1). Neither Calyculin A nor Okadaic acid inhibit acid or alkaline phosphatases or phospho- tyrosine protein phosphatases (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rac and Cdc42 are members of the Rho-GTPase family. In mammals, Rac exists as three isoforms, Rac1, Rac2 and Rac3, which are highly similar in sequence. Rac1 and Cdc42, the most widely studied of this group, are ubiquitously expressed. Rac2 is expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin, and Rac3, while highly expressed in brain, is also found in many other tissues. Rac and Cdc42 play key signaling roles in cytoskeletal reorganization, membrane trafficking, transcriptional regulation, cell growth and development (1). GTP binding stimulates the activity of Rac/Cdc42, and the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP through the protein's intrinsic GTPase activity, rendering it inactive. GTP hydrolysis is aided by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), while exchange of GDP for GTP is facilitated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Another level of regulation is achieved through the binding of RhoGDI, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, which retains Rho family GTPases, including Rac and Cdc42, in their inactive GDP-bound state (2,3).

$305
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family consists of an evolutionarily conserved group of apoptosis inhibitors containing a conserved 70 amino acid BIR (baculovirus inhibitor repeat) domain (1,2). Human members of this family include c-IAP1, c-IAP2, XIAP, survivin, livin, and NAIP. Overexpression of IAP family members, particularly survivin and livin, in cancer cell lines and primary tumors suggests an important role for these proteins in cancer progression (3-5). In general, the IAP proteins function through direct interactions to inhibit the activity of several caspases, including caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-9 (5,6). In addition, binding of IAP family members to the mitochondrial protein Smac blocks their interaction with caspase-9, thereby allowing the processing and activation of the caspase (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and referred to as autophagy-related (Atg) genes.Atg13/Apg13 was originally identified in yeast as a constitutively expressed protein that was genetically linked to Atg1/Apg1, a protein kinase required for autophagy (4). Overexpression of Atg1 suppresses the defects in autophagy observed in Atg13 mutants (4). Autophagy requires a direct association between Atg1 and Atg13, and is inhibited by TOR-dependent phosphorylation of Atg13 under high-nutrient conditions (5). Similarly, mammalian Atg13 forms a complex with the Atg1 homologues ULK1/2, along with FIP200, which localizes to autophagic isolation membranes and regulates autophagosome biogenesis (6-8). mTOR phosphorylates both Atg13 and ULK1, suppressing ULK1 kinase activity and autophagy (7-9). ULK1 can directly phosphorylate Atg13 at a yet unidentified site, presumably to promote autophagy (7,8). Additional studies suggest that Atg13 and FIP200 can function independently of ULK1 and ULK2 to induce autophagy through an unknown mechanism (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, CCN2) belongs to the CCN (CYR61, CTGF, NOV) family of secreted extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (1). Members of this family contain four conserved cysteine-rich domains, and interact in the ECM with a diverse array of cell surface receptors, including integrins and heparin-sulfate proteoglycans (2). These interactions regulate a multitude of cellular and tissue functions, including adhesion, proliferation, migration, differentiation, senescence, angiogenesis, inflammation, and wound repair (1, 3-5). The CTGF gene is a transcriptional target of both YAP/TAZ and TGFβ-SMAD signaling pathways (6,7), and aberrant regulation of CTGF expression is strongly associated with pathological conditions, notably cancer and fibrosis (8, 9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected, Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: The MAPK and CDK families of serine/threonine protein kinases play important roles in proliferation and cell cycle control. These kinases phosphorylate threonine or serine followed by a proline residue (1-3). MAPK phosphorylates substrates with the consensus sequence PX(S/T)P, and CDKs phosphorylate substrates containing the consensus sequence (S/T)PXR/K. Cell Signaling Technology has developed antibodies that bind to phospho-threonine followed by proline, motifs PXS*/T*P and/or S*PXR/K, for use in the study and discovery of new MAPK and CDK substrates (4,5).

$314
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tau is a heterogeneous microtubule-associated protein that promotes and stabilizes microtubule assembly, especially in axons. Six isoforms with different amino-terminal inserts and different numbers of tandem repeats near the carboxy terminus have been identified, and tau is hyperphosphorylated at approximately 25 sites by Erk, GSK-3, and CDK5 (1,2). Phosphorylation decreases the ability of tau to bind to microtubules. Neurofibrillary tangles are a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; these tangles are bundles of paired helical filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. In particular, phosphorylation at Ser396 by GSK-3 or CDK5 destabilizes microtubules. Furthermore, research studies have shown that inclusions of tau are found in a number of other neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as tauopathies (1,3).