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Product listing: Mouse Interleukin-1β (mIL-1β), UniProt ID P10749 #5204 to MCP-1 Antibody (Mouse Specific), UniProt ID P10148 #2029

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: p27 Kip1 is a member of the Cip/Kip family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. Like its relatives, p57 Kip2 and p21 Waf1/Cip1, the ability to enforce the G1 restriction point is derived from its inhibitory binding to CDK2/cyclin E and other CDK/cyclin complexes. Expression levels of p27 are upregulated in quiescent cells and in cells treated with cAMP or other negative cell cycle regulators. Downregulation of p27 can be induced by treatment with interleukin-2 or other mitogens; this involves phosphorylation of p27 and its degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (1-4).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of PKC is one of the earliest events in a cascade leading to a variety of cellular responses such as secretion, gene expression, proliferation and muscle contraction (1,2). Protein kinase D (PKD), also called PKCμ, is a serine/threonine kinase whose activation is dependent on the phosphorylation of two activation loop sites, Ser744 and Ser748, via a PKC-dependent signaling pathway (3-5). In addition to the two activation loop sites, the carboxy-terminal Ser916 has been identified as an autophosphorylation site for PKD/PKCμ. Phosphorylation at Ser916 correlates with PKD/PKCμ catalytic activity (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Guinea Pig, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine kinases is engaged in multiple cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, MAPK signaling, apoptotic signaling, control of phagocyte NADPH oxidase, and growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth (1,2). Several mechanisms that induce PAK activity have been reported. Binding of Rac/Cdc42 to the CRIB (or PBD) domain near the amino terminus of PAK causes autophosphorylation and conformational changes in PAK (1). Phosphorylation of PAK1 at Thr423 by PDK induces activation of PAK1 (3). Several autophosphorylation sites have been identified, including Ser199 and Ser204 of PAK1 and Ser192 and Ser197 of PAK2 (4,5). Because the autophosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal inhibitory domain, it has been hypothesized that modification in this region prevents the kinase from reverting to an inactive conformation (6). Research indicates that phosphorylation at Ser144 of PAK1 or Ser139 of PAK3 (located in the kinase inhibitory domain) affects kinase activity (7). Phosphorylation at Ser21 of PAK1 or Ser20 of PAK2 regulates binding with the adaptor protein Nck (8). PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 have lower sequence similarity with PAK1-3 in the amino-terminal regulatory region (9). Phosphorylation at Ser474 of PAK4, a site analogous to Thr423 of PAK1, may play a pivotal role in regulating the activity and function of PAK4 (10).

The Phospho-YAP/TAZ Antibody Sampler Kit uses phospho-specific and control antibodies to provide an economical means of detecting the phosphorylation of YAP and TAZ proteins at critical residues that are reported to regulate YAP and TAZ protein stability. The kit includes enough antibody to perform two western blot experiments with each primary antibody.

Background: YAP and TAZ (WWTR1) are transcriptional co-activators that play a central role in the Hippo Signaling pathway that regulates cell, tissue and organ growth. YAP and TAZ are structurally and functionally similar, but exhibit differential patterns of expression among cells and tissues that suggest partially non-redundant functions (1). YAP and TAZ are dynamically regulated in response to internal and external cellular signals. Under growth conditions, YAP and TAZ are translocated to the nucleus, where they interact with transcription factors (e.g., TEA domain proteins) that regulate the transcription of genes that control proliferation and cell survival (2). The subcellular localization of YAP and TAZ is dynamically regulated by a kinase cascade that regulates the phosphorylation status of key residues within YAP and TAZ. Phosphorylation of YAP and TAZ (e.g., Ser109, Ser127, Ser397 in YAP; Ser89 in TAZ) results in their cytoplasmic translocation, sequestration by 14-3-3 proteins, and recruitment of the β-TrCP (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex (3,4). This complex ubiquitinates YAP and TAZ, triggering their proteolytic degradation in the proteasome, thereby altering the transcription of genes that control proliferation and cell survival (3-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chromosomal translocations result in misregulation of the proto-oncogene BCL6 in patients with B cell-derived non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (1). The BCL6 gene is selectively expressed in mature B cells and encodes a nuclear phosphoprotein that belongs to the BTB/POZ zinc finger family of transcription factors (2,3). BCL6 protein can bind to target DNA sequences of Stat6 and, analogous to Stat6, modulate the expression of interleukin-4-induced genes (4). Furthermore, BCL6 restrains p53-dependent senescence, making BCL6-active tumors functionally p53-negative (5). The mitogen-activated protein kinases, Erk1 and Erk2, but not JNK, phosphorylate BCL6 at multiple sites. Phosphorylation of BCL6 at Ser333 and Ser343 results in degradation of BCL6 by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway in B cells (6,7). In addition, BCL6 is acetylated and its transcriptional repressor function is inhibited by the transcriptional co-activator p300 (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) comprise a family of transcription factors that function within the Jak/Stat pathway to regulate interferon (IFN) and IFN-inducible gene expression in response to viral infection (1). IRFs play an important role in pathogen defense, autoimmunity, lymphocyte development, cell growth, and susceptibility to transformation. The IRF family includes nine members: IRF-1, IRF-2, IRF-9/ISGF3γ, IRF-3, IRF-4 (Pip/LSIRF/ICSAT), IRF-5, IRF-6, IRF-7, and IRF-8/ICSBP. All IRF proteins share homology in their amino-terminal DNA-binding domains. IRF family members regulate transcription through interactions with proteins that share similar DNA-binding motifs, such as IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE), IFN consensus sequences (ICS), and IFN regulatory elements (IRF-E) (2).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinases (RSK1-4) are a family of widely expressed Ser/Thr kinases characterized by two nonidentical, functional kinase domains (1) and a carboxy-terminal docking site for extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) (2). Several sites both within and outside of the RSK kinase domain, including Ser380, Thr359, Ser363, and Thr573, are important for kinase activation (3). RSK1-3 are activated via coordinated phosphorylation by MAPKs, autophosphorylation, and phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K) in response to many growth factors, polypeptide hormones, and neurotransmitters (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of proteins activated in response to nutrient deprivation and in neurodegenerative conditions (1). One of the proteins critical to this process is Beclin-1, the mammalian orthologue of the yeast autophagy protein Apg6/Vps30 (2). Beclin-1 can complement defects in yeast autophagy caused by loss of Apg6 and can also stimulate autophagy when overexpressed in mammalian cells (3). Mammalian Beclin-1 was originally isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen for Bcl-2 interacting proteins and has been shown to interact with Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, but not with Bax or Bak (4). While Beclin-1 is generally ubiquitously expressed, research studies have shown it is monoallelically deleted in 40-75% of sporadic human breast and ovarian cancers (5). Beclin-1 is localized within cytoplasmic structures including the mitochondria, although overexpression of Beclin-1 reveals some nuclear staining and CRM1-dependent nuclear export (6). Investigators have demonstrated that Beclin-1-/- mice die early in embryogenesis and Beclin-1-/+ mice have a high incidence of spontaneous tumors. Stem cells from the null mice demonstrate an altered autophagic response, although responses to apoptosis appeared normal (7). Researchers have also found that overexpression of Beclin-1 in virally infected neurons in vivo resulted in significant protection against Sindbis virus-induced disease and neuronal apoptosis (4).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

The StemLight™ iPS cell Reprogramming Antibody Kit contains a panel of antibodies for the detection of various proteins, combinations of which have been used to reprogram somatic cells to Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells. The kit can be used to track efficiency of expression of the reprogramming factors following transfection, viral transduction and other means of protein delivery. The kit components are pre-optimized for parallel use in immunofluorescent analysis at a standard dilution, but components are also validated for use in other applications --please refer to individual data sheet information for application specific recommendations. Enough reagents are provided for 160 immunofluorescent assays based on a working volume of 100 μl.

Background: Pluripotency is the ability of a cell to differentiate into cell types of the three germ layers, the endoderm, ectoderm and mesoderm. It is a property shared by embryonic stem cells, embryonic carcinoma and induced pluripotent cells.Oct-4, Sox2 and Nanog are key transcriptional regulators that are highly expressed in pluripotent cells (1). Together they form a transcriptional network that maintains cells in a pluripotent state (2,3). Over-expression of Oct-4 and Sox2 along with Klf4 and c- Myc can induce pluripotency in both mouse and human somatic cells, highlighting their roles as key regulators of the transcrip- tional network necessary for renewal and pluripotency (4-5). It has also been demonstrated that overexpression of Oct-4, Sox2, Nanog and Lin28 can induce pluripotency in human somatic cells (6). Upon differentiation of pluripotent cultures, expression of Oct-4, Nanog and Sox2 is downregulated.SSEA4, TRA-1-81 and TRA-1-60 antibodies recognize antigens expressed on the cell surface of all pluripotent cells. SSEA4 recognizes a glycolipid carbohydrate epitope (7). TRA-1-60(S) and TRA-1-81 antibodies recognize different proteoglycan epitopes on variants of the same protein, podocalyxin (8). These epitopes are neuraminadase sensitive and resistant, respectively. Reactivity of SSEA4, TRA-1-81 and TRA-1-60 antibodies with their respective cell surface markers are lost upon differentiation of pluripotent cells, corresponding with a loss of pluripotent potential (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Stimulator of interferon genes (STING, TMEM173, MITA) is a transmembrane adaptor protein that is a critical component of the cellular innate immune response to pathogenic cytoplasmic DNA (1,2). STING is a ubiquitously expressed protein found predominantly in the ER (1). The enzyme cGAMP synthase (cGAS) produces the second messenger cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) in response to cytoplasmic DNA (3,4). cGAMP binds and activates STING (3,4). In addition, detection of cytoplasmic DNA by nucleic acid sensors, including DDX41 or IFI16, results in STING activation (5,6). Following activation, STING translocates with TBK1 to perinuclear endosomes (7). The TBK1 kinase phosphorylates and activates interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and NF-κB, which leads to the induction of type I interferon and other immune response genes (1,2,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ferritin (FTH) is a ubiquitous and highly conserved protein which plays a major role in iron homeostasis by sequestering and storing iron in a non-toxic and bioavailable form (1). The assembled ferritin molecule, often referred to as a nanocage, can store up to 4,500 atoms of iron (2,3). It forms a holoenzyme of ~450 kDa, consisting of 24 subunits made up of two types of polypeptide chains: ferritin heavy chain and ferritin light chain, each having unique functions. Ferritin heavy chains catalyze the first step in iron storage, the oxidation of Fe(II), whereas ferritin light chains promote the nucleation of ferrihydrite, enabling storage of Fe(III) (4). In addition to iron buffering, heavy chain ferritin also enhances thymidine biosynthesis (5). Serum ferritin levels serve as an indicator of the amount of iron stored in the body. Serum ferritin is the most sensitive test for anaemia. The level of serum ferritin is markedly elevated in inflammation, malignancy, and iron overload disorders (6). Research studies have found that defects in ferritin proteins are also associated with several neurodegenerative diseases (7).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Total Histone H3 Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of histone H3. A Histone H3 Rabbit Antibody has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, histone H3 (modified and unmodified) is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, Histone H3 mouse mAb is added to detect the captured histone H3 protein. Anti-Mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibodyis then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of the absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of total histone H3.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Stat1 transcription factor is activated in response to a large number of ligands (1) and is essential for responsiveness to IFN-α and IFN-γ (2,3). Phosphorylation of Stat1 at Tyr701 induces Stat1 dimerization, nuclear translocation, and DNA binding (4). Stat1 protein exists as a pair of isoforms, Stat1α (91 kDa) and the splice variant Stat1β (84 kDa). In most cells, both isoforms are activated by IFN-α, but only Stat1α is activated by IFN-γ. The inappropriate activation of Stat1 occurs in many tumors (5). In addition to tyrosine phosphorylation, Stat1 is also phosphorylated at Ser727 through a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent pathway in response to IFN-α and other cellular stresses (6). Serine phosphorylation may be required for the maximal induction of Stat1-mediated gene activation.

The Loading Control Antibody Sampler Kit contains antibodies to a variety of housekeeping proteins. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blots per primary antibody.
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) binds to the mRNA cap structure to mediate the initiation of translation (1,2). eIF4E interacts with eIF4G, a scaffold protein that promotes assembly of eIF4E and eIF4A into the eIF4F complex (2). eIF4B is thought to assist the eIF4F complex in translation initiation. Upon activation by mitogenic and/or stress stimuli mediated by Erk and p38 MAPK, Mnk1 phosphorylates eIF4E at Ser209 in vivo (3,4). Two Erk and p38 MAPK phosphorylation sites in mouse Mnk1 (Thr197 and Thr202) are essential for Mnk1 kinase activity (3). The carboxy-terminal region of eIF4G also contains serum-stimulated phosphorylation sites, including Ser1108, Ser1148, and Ser1192 (5). Phosphorylation at these sites is blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 and by the FRAP/mTOR inhibitor rapamycin.

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The breast cancer susceptibility proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 are frequently mutated in cases of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and have roles in multiple processes related to DNA damage, repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, ubiquitination, and apoptosis (1-4). BRCA2 has been shown to be required for localization of Rad51 to sites of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA, and cells lacking BRCA1 and BRCA2 cannot repair DSBs through the Rad51-dependent process of homologous recombination (HR) (5). Numerous DNA damage-induced phosphorylation sites on BRCA1 have been identified, including Ser988, 1189, 1387, 1423, 1457, 1524, and 1542, and kinases activated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, including Aurora A and CDK2, can also phosphorylate BRCA1 at Ser308 and Ser1497, respectively (6-10). Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of BRCA2 at Ser3291 by CDKs has been proposed as a mechanism to switch off HR as cells progress beyond S-phase by blocking the carboxy terminal Rad51 binding site (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neurofibromin is a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (RasGAP), down-regulating Ras signaling (1). Studies have shown, that mutations in NF1 inhibit its activity, resulting in benign tumors such as neurofibromas, which may form along nerves throughout the body resulting in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) (2). NF1 is one of the most common autosomal dominant diseases however it remains unclear how mutation of NF1 may lead to other features of NF1 (3). In addition, NF1 mutations occur in 5-10% of human sporadic malignancies such as glioblastomas, lung adenocarcinomas, melanomas, breast and ovarian cancers, and acute myeloid leukemias. Mutations in NF1 can cause resistance to therapies including chemotherapy and radiation therapy (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB1) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional Y-box proteins that bind single-stranded DNA and RNA and function as regulators of transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein synthesis (1). YB1 binds to Y-box sequences (TAACC) found in multiple gene promoters and can positively or negatively regulate transcription. YB1 activates genes associated with proliferation and cancer, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and the multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene (2-4). YB1 represses genes associated with cell death, including the Fas cell death-associated receptor and the p53 tumor suppressor gene (5-7). It also interacts with the RNA-splicing factor SRp30c and stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA upon induction of T lymphocytes by IL-2 (8,9). The majority of YB1 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, with a minor pool found in the nucleus; however, nuclear localization appears to be critical for its role in promoting proliferation. Nuclear translocation is cell cycle regulated, with YB1 protein accumulating in the nucleus during G1/S phase (2). In addition, nuclear translocation is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as hyperthermia and UV irradiation, or treatment of cells with thrombin, interferons, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) (2,10). Treatment of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with IGF-I results in Akt-mediated phosphorylation of YB1 at Ser102, which is required for nuclear translocation of YB1 and its ability to promote anchorage-independent growth (10). Research studies have shown that YB1 is overexpressed in many malignant tissues, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinomas, human osteosarcomas, colorectal carcinomas, and malignant melanomas. Investigators have shown that nuclear YB1 expression correlates with high levels of proliferation, drug resistance, and poor tumor prognosis (2,7,10).

$314
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, S. cerevisiae

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). Histone acetylation occurs mainly on the amino-terminal tail domains of histones H2A (Lys5), H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20), H3 (Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, 36 and 56), and H4 (Lys5, 8, 12, and 16) and is important for the regulation of histone deposition, transcriptional activation, DNA replication, recombination, and DNA repair (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites for a protein module called the bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins contain bromodomains and may be recruited to gene promoters, in part, through binding of acetylated histone tails. Histone acetylation is mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), such as CBP/p300, GCN5L2, PCAF, and Tip60, which are recruited to genes by DNA-bound protein factors to facilitate transcriptional activation (3). Deacetylation, which is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDAC and sirtuin proteins), reverses the effects of acetylation and generally facilitates transcriptional repression (7,8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS, VISA) contributes to innate immunity by triggering IRF-3 and NF-κB activation in response to viral infection, leading to the production of IFN-β (1). The MAVS protein contains an N-terminal CARD domain and a C-terminal mitochondrial transmembrane domain. The MAVS adaptor protein plays a critical and specific role in viral defenses (2). MAVS acts downstream of the RIG-I RNA helicase and viral RNA sensor, leading to the recruitment of IKKε, TRIF and TRAF6 (3,4). Some viruses have evolved strategies to circumvent these innate defenses by using proteases that cleave MAVS to prevent its mitochondrial localization (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Type 1 protein phosphatase (PP1), a serine/threonine phosphatase, is highly conserved in eukaryotic cells. Four isoforms of PP1 have been characterized: PP1α, PP1δ, PP1γ1 and PP1γ2 (1). Involvement in cell cycle regulation is one of the biological functions of PP1 (1). It has been illustrated that PP1 dephosphorylates Rb and cdc25 during mitosis (2,3). A cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation at Thr320 of PP1α by cdc2 kinase inhibits PP1α activity (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Thioredoxin is a small redox protein found in many eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A pair of cysteines within a highly conserved, active site sequence can be oxidized to form a disulfide bond that is then reduced by thioredoxin reductase (1). Multiple forms of thioredoxin have been identified, including cytosolic thioredoxin 1 (TRX1) and mitochondrial thioredoxin 2 (TRX2). Thioredoxin participates in many cellular processes including redox signaling, response to oxidative stress, and protein reduction (1). A potential role of thioredoxin in human disorders such as cancer, aging, and heart disease is currently under investigation (2). Thioredoxin can play a key role in cancer progression, because it acts as a negative regulator of the proapoptotic kinase ASK1 (3). Changes in thioredoxin expression have been associated with meningococcal septic shock and acute lung injury (4,5).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Syk (Tyr525/526) (C87C1) Rabbit mAb #2710.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Syk is a protein tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in intracellular signal transduction in hematopoietic cells (1-3). Syk interacts with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) located in the cytoplasmic domains of immune receptors (4). It couples the activated immunoreceptors to downstream signaling events that mediate diverse cellular responses, including proliferation, differentiation, and phagocytosis (4). There is also evidence of a role for Syk in nonimmune cells and investigators have indicated that Syk is a potential tumor suppressor in human breast carcinomas (5). Tyr323 is a negative regulatory phosphorylation site within the SH2-kinase linker region in Syk. Phosphorylation at Tyr323 provides a direct binding site for the TKB domain of Cbl (6,7). Tyr352 of Syk is involved in the association of PLCγ1 (8). Tyr525 and Tyr526 are located in the activation loop of the Syk kinase domain; phosphorylation at Tyr525/526 of human Syk (equivalent to Tyr519/520 of mouse Syk) is essential for Syk function (9).

The Phospho-Akt Isoform Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of detecting the activation of Akt family members using phospho-specific and control antibodies. The kit contains enough primary antibodies to perform at least two western blot experiments per antibody.

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Stat2 (113-kDa), originally purified from the nuclei of alpha-interferon-treated cells, is critical to the transcriptional responses induced by type I interferons, IFN-alpha/beta (1,2). Knockout mice with a targeted disruption of Stat2 have higher susceptibility to viral infection and altered responses to type I interferons (3). Stat2 is rapidly activated by phosphorylation at Tyr690 in response to stimulation by IFN-alpha/beta via associations with receptor-bound Jak kinases (4). Unlike other Stat proteins, Stat2 does not form homodimers. Instead, activated Stat2 forms a heterodimer with Stat1 and translocates to the nucleus. There, it associates with the DNA-binding protein p48 and forms the transcriptional activator complex, interferon-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3), promoting transcription from the ISRE (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF, CSF-1) receptor is an integral membrane tyrosine kinase encoded by the c-fms proto-oncogene. M-CSF receptor is expressed in monocytes (macrophages and their progenitors) and drives growth and development of this blood cell lineage. (1-3). Binding of M-CSF to its receptor induces receptor dimerization, activation, and autophosphorylation of cytoplasmic tyrosine residues used as docking sites for SH2-containing signaling proteins (4). There are at least five major tyrosine autophosphorylation sites. Tyr723 (Tyr721 in mouse) is located in the kinase insert (KI) region. Phosphorylated Tyr723 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase as well as PLCγ2 (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr809 provides a docking site for Shc (5). Overactivation of this receptor can lead to a malignant phenotype in various cell systems (6). The activated M-CSF receptor has been shown to be a predictor of poor outcome in advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma (7) and breast cancer (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), also known as CCL2, monocyte chemotactic activating factor (MCAF) or glioma-derived chemotactic factor-2 (GDCF-2), is the product of the human JE gene and a member of the family of C-C (or β) chemokines (1-4). The predicted molecular weight of MCP-1 protein is 11-13 kDa, but it may migrate at 20-30 kDa due to glycosylation. MCP-1 is secreted by a variety of cell types in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli and was originally described for its chemotactic activity on monocytes. This activity has led to studies demonstrating its role in diseases characterized by monocyte infiltrates such as psoriasis (5), rheumatoid arthritis (6) and atherosclerosis (7). MCP-1 may also contribute to tumor progression and angiogenesis (8). Signaling by MCP-1 is mediated by the G-protein coupled receptor CCR2 (9).