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Product listing: Rig-I (D33H10) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID O95786 #4200 to PathScan® Phospho-Met (Tyr1234/1235) Sandwich ELISA Kit, UniProt ID P08581 #7227

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Antiviral innate immunity depends on the combination of parallel pathways triggered by virus detecting proteins in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family and RNA helicases, such as Rig-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) and MDA-5 (melanoma differentiation-associated antigen 5), which promote the transcription of type I interferons (IFN) and antiviral enzymes (1-3). TLRs and helicase proteins contain sites that recognize the molecular patterns of different virus types, including DNA, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and glycoproteins. These antiviral proteins are found in different cell compartments; TLRs (i.e. TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9) are expressed on endosomal membranes and helicases are localized to the cytoplasm. Rig-I expression is induced by retinoic acid, LPS, IFN, and viral infection (4,5). Both Rig-I and MDA-5 share a DExD/H-box helicase domain that detects viral dsRNA and two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARD) that are required for triggering downstream signaling (4-7). Rig-I binds both dsRNA and viral ssRNA that contains a 5'-triphosphate end not seen in host RNA (8,9). Though structurally related, Rig-I and MDA-5 detect a distinct set of viruses (10,11). The CARD domain of the helicases, which is sufficient to generate signaling and IFN production, is recruited to the CARD domain of the MAVS/VISA/Cardif/IPS-1 mitochondrial protein, which triggers activation of NF-κB, TBK1/IKKε, and IRF-3/IRF-7 (12-15).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated GATA-6 (D61E4) XP® Rabbit mAb #26452.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: GATA proteins comprise a group of transcription factors that are related by the presence of conserved zinc finger DNA binding domains, which bind directly to the nucleotide sequence core element GATA (1-3). There are six vertebrate GATA proteins, designated GATA-1 to GATA-6 (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian sterile-20-like (MST) kinases are upstream regulators of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways that regulate multiple cellular processes, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and cytoskeletal rearrangement (1). This family of serine/threonine kinases includes MST1 (STK4) and MST2 (STK3), two functionally related proteins with conserved amino-terminal kinase domains and carboxy-terminal regulatory domains that contain nuclear export signals (1-3). During apoptosis, caspase-mediated cleavage of MST1/2 removes the inhibitory regulatory domain, triggering autophosphorylation and activation of the kinase domain, which is translocated to the nucleus. Nuclear translocation of the active kinase induces chromatin condensation and other events associated with apoptotic progression (4).Research studies indicate that MST1/2 are orthologous to Drosophila Hippo (Hpo), one of the core regulatory proteins in the Hippo signaling pathway. This evolutionarily conserved program controls tissue growth and organ size by regulating cell proliferation, apoptosis, and stem cell self-renewal. The mammalian Hippo signaling pathway involves a kinase cascade, where the MST1/2 kinases and the SAV1 scaffold protein form a complex that leads to phosphorylation and activation of LATS1/2. The LATS1/2 kinases phosphorylate YAP and TAZ, promoting cytoplasmic sequestration and inhibition of these transcription coactivators (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CDX2, a homeobox domain-containing transcription factor, is a master regulator of the trophoectoderm, the layer that gives rise to extra-embryonic tissues in mammalian development (1). CDX2 is also involved in intestinal development (2), and gain of expression or loss of expression has been associated with various human malignancies such as Barret Esophagus (3) and colorectal cancer (4,5). Mouse embryonic stem cells deficient in CDX2 display limited hematopoietic progenitor development and altered Hox gene expression (6), pointing to a role for CDX2 in Hox gene regulation. CDX2 is also implicated in the aberrant expression of Hox genes in human AML cell lines (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Nucleophosmin (NPM; also known as B23, numatrin or NO38) is an abundant phosphoprotein primarily found in nucleoli. It has been implicated in several distinct cellular functions, including assembly and transport of ribosomes, cytoplasmic/nuclear trafficking, regulation of DNA polymerase α activity, centrosome duplication and molecular chaperoning activities (1,2). The NPM gene is also known for its fusion with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase. The NPM portion contributes to transformation by providing a dimerization domain, which results in activation of the fused kinase (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box (Fox) proteins are a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors containing a sequence known as Forkhead box or winged helix DNA binding domain (1). The human genome contains 43 Fox proteins that are divided into subfamilies. The FoxP subfamily has four members, FoxP1 - FoxP4, which are broadly expressed and play important roles in organ development, immune response and cancer pathogenesis (2-4). The FoxP subfamily has several characteristics that are atypical among Fox proteins: their Forkhead domain is located at the carboxy-terminal region and they contain motifs that promote homo- and heterodimerization. FoxP proteins usually function as transcriptional repressors (4,5).

$122
20 µl
$303
200 µl
$717
600 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$158
10 western blots
10 Pack
Nitrocellulose Membrane Dimensions: 80 x 90 mm, Pore Size: 0.2 μm, Binding Capacity: 115-125 μg IgG/cm2
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Western Blotting

The BCA Protein Assay Kit can be used to measure the protein concentration of lysates or homogenates, in microplate format, prepared with the following buffers: Cell Lysis Buffer (10X) #9803, RIPA Buffer (10X) #9806, PathScan® Sandwich ELISA Lysis Buffer (1X) #7018. The dynamic range for this assay is 0.125 - 2 mg/mL. It is recommended that the BCA Compatibility Reagent be used to decrease interference from reducing agents, chelators, detergents, and other common ingredients found in most lysis buffers. Please see the attached protocol for additional details.
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cdc25 protein phosphatase family plays a critical role in activating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) via dephosphorylation of conserved Thr14/Tyr15 inhibitory phosphorylation sites. While cdc25C is primarily responsible for activating CDK1 to overcome the G2/M checkpoint and allow mitotic entry, the primary substrate of cdc25A is CDK2, which, when active, allows progression through the G1/S and intra-S checkpoints (1). Abundance, subcellular localization and activity of cdc25A is tightly controlled by a variety of mechanisms, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and inhibitory binding to 14-3-3 proteins. During normal cell cycle progression, elevated c-Myc and E2F transcription factor levels lead to increased cdc25A expression (2). When conditions are favorable for DNA synthesis, cdc25A and CDK2 form an activation loop, wherein each activates the other enzyme (1). DNA damage, on the other hand, leads to multisite phosphorylation at inhibitory sites (Ser123, Ser177, Ser278, Ser292, and Thr506) by Chk1 and Chk2, which result in 14-3-3 binding and ubiquitin-mediated degradation (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The c-Cbl proto-oncogene is a ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic adaptor protein that is especially predominant in hematopoietic cells (1,2). c-Cbl is rapidly tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to stimulation of a variety of cell-surface receptors and becomes associated with a number of intracellular signaling molecules such as protein tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, Crk, and 14-3-3 proteins (3,4). c-Cbl possesses a highly conserved amino-terminal phosphotyrosine binding domain (TKB) and a C3HC4 RING finger motif. The TKB recognizes phosphorylated tyrosines on activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) as well as other nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. The RING finger motif recruits ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. These two domains are primarily responsible for the ubiquitin ligase activity of c-Cbl and downregulation of RTKs (3). Research studies have indicated that in human cancer tissues, c-Cbl is frequently tyrosine-phosphorylated in a tumor-specific manner (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr731 of c-Cbl provides a docking site for downstream signaling components such as p85 and Fyn (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Next to BRCA1 gene 1 (NBR1) protein is known for its encoding gene proximity to the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene (1,2). N-terminal Phox and Bem1p (PB1) domains of NBR1 mediate its interaction with muscle specific titin kinase (3,4) and scaffolding protein p62 (4). NBR1 plays a role in autophagy by facilitating the autophagosomal degradation of ubiquitinated proteins independently and also in concert with p62 (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Secretory proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during synthesis where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. To reach their native conformation, many secretory proteins require the formation of intra- or inter-molecular disulfide bonds (1). This process is called oxidative protein folding. Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has two thioredoxin homology domains and catalyzes the formation and isomerization of these disulfide bonds (2). Other ER resident proteins that possess thioredoxin homology domains, including ER stress protein 72 (ERp72), constitute the PDI family (3,4). ERp72 contains three thioredoxin homology domains (3) and plays a role in the formation and isomerization of disulfide bonds (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Hamster, Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: p130 Cas (Crk-associated substrate) is a docking protein containing multiple protein-protein interaction domains. The amino-terminal SH3 domain may function as a molecular switch regulating CAS tyrosine phosphorylation, as it interacts with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (1) and the FAK-related kinase PYK2 (2), as well as the tyrosine phosphatases PTP-1B (3) and PTP-PEST (4). The carboxy-terminal Src binding domain (SBD) contains a proline-rich motif that mediates interaction with the SH3 domains of Src-family kinases (SFKs) and a tyrosine phosphorylation site (Tyr668 and/or Tyr670) that can promote interaction with the SH2 domain of SFKs (5). The p130 Cas central substrate domain, the major region of tyrosine phosphorylation, is characterized by 15 tyrosines present in Tyr-X-X-Pro (YXXP) motifs, including Tyr165, 249, and 410. When phosphorylated, most YXXP motifs are able to serve as docking sites for proteins with SH2 or PTB domains including adaptors, C-Crk, Nck, and inositol 5'-phosphatase 2 (SHIP2) (6). The tyrosine phosphorylation of p130 Cas has been implicated as a key signaling step in integrin control of normal cellular behaviors including motility, proliferation, and survival. Aberrant Cas tyrosine phosphorylation may contribute to cell transformation by certain oncoproteins (5).

$146
100 µl
Affinity purified mouse anti-rabbit IgG (Conformation Specific) antibody. This product has been optimized for use as a secondary antibody in Western blotting applications.
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Western Blotting

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 21 kDa guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (K-Ras, H-Ras, and N-Ras) cycle between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) forms (1). Receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors activate Ras, which then stimulates the Raf-MEK-MAPK pathway (2-4). GTPase-activating proteins (GAP) normally facilitate the inactivation of Ras. However, research studies have shown that in 30% of human tumors, point mutations in Ras prevent the GAP-mediated inhibition of this pathway (5). The most common oncogenic Ras mutation found in tumors is Gly12 to Asp12 (G12D), which prevents Ras inactivation, possibly by increasing the overall rigidity of the protein (5,6).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Vimentin (D21H3) XP® Rabbit mAb #5741.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Basic leucine zipper transcriptional factor ATF-like (BATF) is a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor and is part of the AP-1/ATF family that forms inhibitory dimers with members of the Jun family (1-3). Expression of BATF is largely restricted with highest levels found in mature T cells, and it is induced in B cells following immune responses including viral infection (1,2). BATF expression is also induced by IL-6 via a Stat3-dependent mechanism (4). BATF plays an important role in the differentiation of immune cell lineages (5-7). Studies of BATF-deficient mice have demonstrated a critical role for BATF in the formation of IL-17-expressing Th17 cells, in part, by regulating the expression of IL-17 (5,6). BATF knockouts are resistant to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EEA), consistent with the role of Th17 cells in this model for autoimmunity (5). Additional studies have found that BATF is important in generating antibody class switching. BATF is required for the generation of follicular helper T cells (Tfh), by regulating BCL6 and c-Maf (6,7). In B cells, BATF controls the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and regulates class-switched antibody responses (7). Taken together, these studies suggest that BATF is a key regulator of distinct populations of immune cells.

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated GAPDH (D4C6R) Mouse mAb #97166.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate during glycolysis. Though differentially expressed from tissue to tissue (1), GAPDH is thought to be a constitutively expressed housekeeping protein. For this reason, GAPDH mRNA and protein levels are often measured as controls in experiments quantifying specific changes in expression of other targets. Recent work has elucidated roles for GAPDH in apoptosis (2), gene expression (3), and nuclear transport (4). GAPDH may also play a role in neurodegenerative pathologies such as Huntington and Alzheimer's diseases (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Synaptophysin (SYP) is a neuronal synaptic vesicle glycoprotein that is expressed in neuroendocrine cells and neoplasms (1). Synaptophysin contains four transmembrane domains that form a hexameric channel or gap junction-like pore (2). Synaptophysin binds to the SNARE protein synaptobrevin/VAMP, which prevents the inclusion of synaptobrevin in the synaptic vesicle fusion complex and creates a pool of synaptobrevin for exocytosis when synapse activity increases (3). Synaptophysin is also responsible for targeting synaptobrevin 2/VAMP2 to synaptic vesicles, a critical component of the fusion complex (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rac and Cdc42 are members of the Rho-GTPase family. In mammals, Rac exists as three isoforms, Rac1, Rac2 and Rac3, which are highly similar in sequence. Rac1 and Cdc42, the most widely studied of this group, are ubiquitously expressed. Rac2 is expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin, and Rac3, while highly expressed in brain, is also found in many other tissues. Rac and Cdc42 play key signaling roles in cytoskeletal reorganization, membrane trafficking, transcriptional regulation, cell growth and development (1). GTP binding stimulates the activity of Rac/Cdc42, and the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP through the protein's intrinsic GTPase activity, rendering it inactive. GTP hydrolysis is aided by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), while exchange of GDP for GTP is facilitated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Another level of regulation is achieved through the binding of RhoGDI, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, which retains Rho family GTPases, including Rac and Cdc42, in their inactive GDP-bound state (2,3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Set1 histone methyltransferase protein was first identified in yeast as part of the Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complex, which methylates histone H3 at Lys4 and functions as a transcriptional co-activator (1). While yeast contain only one known Set1 protein, mammals contain six Set1-related proteins: SET1A, SET1B, MLL1, MLL2, MLL3, and MLL4, all of which assemble into COMPASS-like complexes and methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (2,3). These Set1-related proteins are each found in distinct protein complexes, all of which share the common subunits WDR5, RBBP5, ASH2L, CXXC1 and DPY30, which are required for proper complex assembly and modulation of histone methyltransferase activity (2-6). MLL1 and MLL2 complexes contain the additional protein subunit, menin (6).MLL1 functions as a master regulator of both embryogenesis and hematopoiesis, and is required for proper expression of Hox genes (7,8). MLL1 is a large, approximately 4000 amino acid, protein that is cleaved by the taspase 1 threonine endopeptidase to form N-terminal (MLL1-N) and C-terminal MLL1 (MLL1-C) fragments, both of which are subunits of the functional MLL1/COMPASS complex (9,10). MLL1-N, MLL1-C, WDR5, RBBP5 and ASH2L define the core catalytic component of the MLL1/COMPASS complex, which is recruited to target genes and methylates histone H3 lysine 4 to regulate transcriptional initiation (11). At least 60 different MLL1 translocation partners have been molecularly characterized and associated with various hematological malignancies. The most common translocation partners include AF4, AF9, ENL, AF10, ELL and AF6 (8,12,13). With the exception of AF6, all of these partners are nuclear proteins that function to positively regulate transcriptional elongation. AF4, AF9 and ENL are all components of the super elongation complex (SEC), while AF4, AF9, AF10 and ENL all interact with the histone H3 lysine 79 methyltransferase DOT1L. Many MLL1 target genes are normally regulated by promoter-proximal pausing, with the release of RNA polymerase and transcriptional elongation occurring in response to proper stimuli (14). The association of MLL1 translocation partners with SEC and DOT1L suggest that MLL1-fusion proteins may function to sustain specific gene expression programs by constitutively activating transcriptional elongation.

$553
500 assays (96 well format)
1 Kit
The BrdU Cell Proliferation Assay Kit detects 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporated into cellular DNA during cell proliferation using an anti-BrdU antibody. When cells are cultured with labeling medium that contains BrdU, this pyrimidine analog is incorporated in place of thymidine into the newly synthesized DNA of proliferating cells. After removing labeling medium, cells are fixed and the DNA is denatured with our fixing/denaturing solution. Denaturing of DNA is necessary to improve the accessibility of the incorporated BrdU to the detection antibody. A BrdU mouse mAb is then added to detect the incorporated BrdU. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked Antibody is used to recognize the bound detection antibody. Chemiluminescent reagent is added for signal development. The magnitude of light emission, measured in relative light units (RLU), is proportional to the quantity of BrdU incorporated into cells, which is a direct indication of cell proliferation.
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Background: Halogenated nucleotides such as the pyrimidine analog bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) are useful for labeling nascent DNA in living cells and tissues. BrdU becomes incorporated into replicating DNA in place of thymidine and subsequent immunodetection of BrdU using specific monoclonal antibodies allows labeling of cells in S phase of the cell cycle. After pulse-labeling cells or tissues with bromodeoxyuridine, BrdU (Bu20a) Mouse mAb can be used to detect BrdU incorporated into single stranded DNA. Please see our detailed protocol for information regarding the labeling procedure and denaturation of double stranded DNA for various immunodetection applications (1-4).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, KDR, Flk-1) is a major receptor for VEGF-induced signaling in endothelial cells. Upon ligand binding, VEGFR2 undergoes autophosphorylation and becomes activated (1). Major autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR2 are located in the kinase insert domain (Tyr951/996) and in the tyrosine kinase catalytic domain (Tyr1054/1059) (2). Activation of the receptor leads to rapid recruitment of adaptor proteins, including Shc, GRB2, PI3 kinase, NCK, and the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 (3). Phosphorylation at Tyr1212 provides a docking site for GRB2 binding and phospho-Tyr1175 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase and PLCγ, as well as Shb (1,4,5). Signaling from VEGFR2 is necessary for the execution of VEGF-stimulated proliferation, chemotaxis and sprouting, as well as survival of cultured endothelial cells in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo (6-8).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Phospho-Met (Tyr1234/1235) Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of Met when phosphorylated at Tyr1234/1235. A Phospho-Met (Tyr1234/1235) Rabbit Antibody has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, phospho-Met (Tyr1234/1235) is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a Met Mouse Detection Antibody is added to detect the captured phospho-Met protein. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-Linked Antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of the absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of Met phosphorylated at Tyr1234/1235.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Met, a high affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, also known as scatter factor) is a disulfide-linked heterodimer made of 45 kDa α- and 145 kDa β-subunits (1,2). The α-subunit and the amino-terminal region of the β-subunit form the extracellular domain. The remainder of the β-chain spans the plasma membrane and contains a cytoplasmic region with tyrosine kinase activity. Interaction of Met with HGF results in autophosphorylation at multiple tyrosines, which recruit several downstream signaling components, including Gab1, c-Cbl, and PI3 kinase (3). These fundamental events are important for all of the biological functions involving Met kinase activity. The addition of a phosphate at cytoplasmic Tyr1003 is essential for Met protein ubiquitination and degradation (4). Phosphorylation at Tyr1234/1235 in the Met kinase domain is critical for kinase activation. Phosphorylation at Tyr1349 in the Met cytoplasmic domain provides a direct binding site for Gab1 (5). Research studies have shown that altered Met levels and/or tyrosine kinase activities are found in several types of tumors, including renal, colon, and breast. Thus, investigators have concluded that Met is an attractive potential cancer therapeutic and diagnostic target (6,7).