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Product listing: TIMP1 (D10E6) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P01033 #8946 to Phospho-AMPKα1 (Ser485) (45F5) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q13131 #2537

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TIMPs are members of the family of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that includes TIMP1, TIMP2, TIMP3, and TIMP4. The main function of TIMPs is their inhibitory effect on MMPs. TIMPs irreversibly inactivate MMPs by direct binding to their catalytic zinc cofactor and resultant inhibition of proteinase function (1,2). In addition to MMP inhibition, TIMPs have also been shown to interact with various membrane receptors on the cell surface. Some of these interactions include: TIMP1 with CD63, TIMP2 with α3β1 integrin, and TIMP3 with VEGFR2, all of which result in distinct cellular effects (3). TIMPs are involved in a wide variety of biological functions, such as tumor angiogenesis and progression (4,5), wound healing, and vascular remodeling (6,7). Mutations in TIMP3 are associated with Sorsby's fundus dystrophy (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Guinea Pig, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine kinases is engaged in multiple cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, MAPK signaling, apoptotic signaling, control of phagocyte NADPH oxidase, and growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth (1,2). Several mechanisms that induce PAK activity have been reported. Binding of Rac/Cdc42 to the CRIB (or PBD) domain near the amino terminus of PAK causes autophosphorylation and conformational changes in PAK (1). Phosphorylation of PAK1 at Thr423 by PDK induces activation of PAK1 (3). Several autophosphorylation sites have been identified, including Ser199 and Ser204 of PAK1 and Ser192 and Ser197 of PAK2 (4,5). Because the autophosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal inhibitory domain, it has been hypothesized that modification in this region prevents the kinase from reverting to an inactive conformation (6). Research indicates that phosphorylation at Ser144 of PAK1 or Ser139 of PAK3 (located in the kinase inhibitory domain) affects kinase activity (7). Phosphorylation at Ser21 of PAK1 or Ser20 of PAK2 regulates binding with the adaptor protein Nck (8). PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 have lower sequence similarity with PAK1-3 in the amino-terminal regulatory region (9). Phosphorylation at Ser474 of PAK4, a site analogous to Thr423 of PAK1, may play a pivotal role in regulating the activity and function of PAK4 (10).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: CD14 is a leucine-rich repeat-containing pattern recognition receptor with expression largely restricted to the monocyte/macrophage cell lineage (1). Research studies have shown that CD14 is a bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding glycoprotein, expressed as either a GPI-linked membrane protein or a soluble plasma protein (2). LPS induces an upregulation of GPI-linked CD14 expression, which facilitates TLR4 signaling and macrophage activation in response to bacterial infection (3-5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Jumonji/ARID domain-containing protein 2 (JARID2) is a founding member of the JmjC-domain-containing protein family that is involved in regulation of histone methyltransferase activity (1,2). While many proteins in this family are protein demethylases, JARID2 lacks several conserved residues in the catalytic domain and does not exhibit protein demethylase activity (1,2). Research studies indicate that JARID2 is a nuclear protein that is highly expressed in poorly differentiated and actively dividing cells, with expression decreasing upon cellular differentiation (3,4). Expression of JARID2 protein is essential for embryonic development as the protein plays an important role in regulation of heart and liver development, neural tube fusion, and hematopoiesis (4). JARID2 is an accessory component of the polycomb repressor complex 2 (PRC2), which represses target gene expression through methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 by EZH2 methyltransferase (5-10). JARID2 recruits the PRC2 complex to target genes and increases EZH2 methyltransferase activity by binding to nucleosomes and DNA (5-10). Additional studies show that loss of JARID2 expression results in decreased recruitment of PRC2, decreased methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 at target genes, and delayed and incomplete differentiation of embryonic stem cells (5-10). Experimental knockdown of JARID2 in Xenopus laevis impairs the induction of gastrulation genes in blastula embryos and results in differentiation failure (5).

PTMScan® Technology employs a proprietary methodology from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) for peptide enrichment by immunoprecipitation using a specific bead-conjugated antibody in conjunction with liquid chromatography (LC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for quantitative profiling of post-translational modification (PTM) sites in cellular proteins. These include phosphorylation (PhosphoScan®), ubiquitination (UbiScan®), acetylation (AcetylScan®), and methylation (MethylScan®), among others. PTMScan® Technology enables researchers to isolate, identify, and quantitate large numbers of post-translationally modified cellular peptides with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, providing a global overview of PTMs in cell and tissue samples without preconceived biases about where these modified sites occur (1). For more information on PTMScan® Proteomics Services, please visit www.cellsignal.com/services/index.html.

Background: Acetylation of lysine, like phosphorylation of serine, threonine or tyrosine, is an important reversible modification controlling protein activity. The conserved amino-terminal domains of the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4) contain lysines that are acetylated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) (1). Signaling resulting in acetylation/deacetylation of histones, transcription factors, and other proteins affects a diverse array of cellular processes including chromatin structure and gene activity, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (2-6). Recent proteomic surveys suggest that acetylation of lysine residues may be a widespread and important form of posttranslational protein modification that affects thousands of proteins involved in control of cell cycle and metabolism, longevity, actin polymerization, and nuclear transport (7,8). The regulation of protein acetylation status is impaired in cancer and polyglutamine diseases (9), and HDACs have become promising targets for anti-cancer drugs currently in development (10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of proteases that target many extracellular proteins including other proteases, growth factors, cell surface receptors, and adhesion molecules (1). Among the family members, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-9 have been characterized as important factors for normal tissue remodeling during embryonic development, wound healing, tumor invasion, angiogenesis, carcinogenesis, and apoptosis (2-4). Research studies have shown that MMP activity correlates with cancer development (2). One mechanism of MMP regulation is transcriptional (5). Once synthesized, MMP exists as a latent proenzyme. Maximum MMP activity requires proteolytic cleavage to generate active MMPs by releasing the inhibitory propeptide domain from the full length protein (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 (CRMP-2) is expressed at high levels in the developing nervous system and plays a critical role in axonal outgrowth by specifying axon/dendrite fate and establishing neuronal polarity (1,2). CRMP-2 enhances axon elongation and branching by binding to tubulin heterodimers to promote microtubule assembly (3). GSK-3β inactivates CRMP-2 by phosphorylating it at Thr514. CRMP-2 is primed following phosphorylation at Ser522 by CDK5 and at Thr518 by GSK-3β (2). Phosphorylation of CRMP-2, which decreases tubulin binding ability, can be inhibited by NT-3 and BDNF through the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway (2). CRMP-2 also mediates semaphorin-induced growth cone collapse (4). Hyperphosphorylation of CRMP-2 is found in Alzheimer disease plaques with concurrent elevated GSK-3β activity in these patients (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tripartite motif-containing protein 21 (TRIM21) is a cytosolic antiviral protein that is induced by interferons and acts as a cytosolic IgG receptor (1,2).  TRIM21 is an activator of the innate immune system and targets antibody bound virions to the proteasome via its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, leading to degradation of the virions in the cytosol (3,4). Interestingly, TRIM21 has also been shown to negatively regulate pathogen-induced interferon production through the polyubiquitin-mediated degradation of multiple targets including IRF3, IRF7, and DDX41 (5,6,7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cullin-4 (CUL4) is a member of the cullin family of related ubiquitin ligases (1). A pair of mammalian CUL4 proteins - CUL4A and CUL4B - has been identified. The carboxy-terminal domain of CUL4 interacts with Rbx1 and E2 enzyme while the amino-terminal CUL4 domain interacts with BPB domain of UV-damaged DNA binding protein DDB1 to form a CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase complex (2). This CUL4-DDB1 complex binds a variety of WD40-containing proteins that help to enhance additional substrate recruitment (2,3). The CUL4 complex has been shown to target substrates involved in DNA repair, cell cycle progression (2), transcription (3), and development (2-6).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: VISTA (V-Domain Ig Suppressor of T Cell Activation) is a negative checkpoint control protein that regulates T cell activation and immune responses. VISTA, which contains a single Ig-like V-type domain, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain, has sequence similarity to both the B7 and CD28 family members. Although primarily expressed by myeloid cells, VISTA is also expressed by CD4+, CD8+, and FoxP3+ T-cells. Thus, VISTA is described as both a ligand and a receptor (1-3). Blocking VISTA induces T-cell activation and proliferation, and potentiates disease severity in the EAE model (1). Furthermore, genetic deletion of VISTA in mice leads to spontaneous T-cell activation and chronic inflammation (4,5). In mouse models of cancer, neutralization of VISTA enhances T-cell proliferation and effector function and increases tumor infiltration, suggesting VISTA blockade could be an effective strategy for tumor immunotherapy (6,7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: In response to cytokines, stress, and chemotactic factors, MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAPK-2) is rapidly phosphorylated and activated. It has been shown that MAPKAPK-2 is a direct target of p38 MAPK (1). Multiple residues of MAPKAPK-2 are phosphorylated in vivo in response to stress. However, only four residues (Thr25, Thr222, Ser272, and Thr334) are phosphorylated by p38 MAPK in an in vitro kinase assay (2). Phosphorylation at Thr222, Ser272, and Thr334 appears to be essential for the activity of MAPKAPK-2 (2). Thr25 is phosphorylated by p42 MAPK in vitro, but is not required for the activation of MAPKAPK-2 (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1) was identified as a transcription activator for the gene encoding cytochrome c (1). It was later found to play a role in the nuclear control of mitochondrial function (1). PGC-1 induces the expression of NRF1 and NRF2 (2). NRF1, along with the coactivator PGC-1, stimulates the promoter of mitochondrial transcription factor A, which regulates mitochondrial biogenensis and function (2).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-9 (ICE-LAP6, Mch6) is an important member of the cysteine aspartic acid protease (caspase) family (1,2). Upon apoptotic stimulation, cytochrome c released from mitochondria associates with the 47 kDa procaspase-9/Apaf-1. Apaf-1 mediated activation of caspase-9 involves intrinsic proteolytic processing resulting in cleavage at Asp315 and producing a p35 subunit. Another cleavage occurs at Asp330 producing a p37 subunit that can serve to amplify the apoptotic response (3-6). Cleaved caspase-9 further processes other caspase members, including caspase-3 and caspase-7, to initiate a caspase cascade, which leads to apoptosis (7-10).

$377
300 units
DyLight™ 594 Phalloidin allows researchers to fluorescently label the cytoskeleton of fixed cells through the binding of phalloidin to F-actin. This product is not intended for use on live cells due to the toxicity associated with phalloidin. After reconstitution the stock solution provides enough material to perform 300 assays based on a 1:20 dilution and a 100 μl assay volume.DyLight™ 594 Fluorescent Properties: Excitation: 585 nm, Emission: 613 nm.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Acetyl-Histone H3 (Lys27) (D5E4) XP® Rabbit mAb #8173.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). Histone acetylation occurs mainly on the amino-terminal tail domains of histones H2A (Lys5), H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20), H3 (Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, 36 and 56), and H4 (Lys5, 8, 12, and 16) and is important for the regulation of histone deposition, transcriptional activation, DNA replication, recombination, and DNA repair (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites for a protein module called the bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins contain bromodomains and may be recruited to gene promoters, in part, through binding of acetylated histone tails. Histone acetylation is mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), such as CBP/p300, GCN5L2, PCAF, and Tip60, which are recruited to genes by DNA-bound protein factors to facilitate transcriptional activation (3). Deacetylation, which is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDAC and sirtuin proteins), reverses the effects of acetylation and generally facilitates transcriptional repression (7,8).

The Death Receptor Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate the machinery of death receptor-mediated apoptosis. The kit includes enough of each primary antibody to perform two western mini-blot experiments per primary.
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Postsynaptic Density protein 95 (PSD95) is a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins. These family members consist of an amino-terminal variable segment followed by three PDZ domains, a SH3 domain, and an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain. PSD95 is a scaffolding protein involved in the assembly and function of the postsynaptic density complex (1-2). PSD95 participates in synaptic targeting of AMPA receptors through an indirect manner involving Stargazin and related transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) (3). It is implicated in experience-dependent plasticity and plays an indispensable role in learning (4). Mutations in PSD95 are associated with autism (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DYRK family includes several dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and regulated kinases capable of phosphorylating proteins at both Tyr and Ser/Thr residues (1). The DYRK family was identified based on homology to the yeast Yak1 (2) and the Drosophila minibrain (mnb) kinases (3). Seven mammalian isoforms have been discovered, including DYRK1A, DYRK1B, DYRK1C, DYRK2, DYRK3, DYRK4, and DYRK4B. Differences in substrate specificity, expression, and subcellular localization are seen across the DYRK family (4,5). All DYRK proteins have a Tyr-X-Tyr motif in the catalytic domain activation loop; phosphorylation of the second Tyr residue (e.g. Tyr312 of DYRK1A) is necessary for kinase activity. DYRKs typically autophosphorylate the Tyr residue within their activation loop, but phosphorylate substrates at Ser and Thr residues (1,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) catalyzes the production of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate by phosphorylating phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP), and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Growth factors and hormones trigger this phosphorylation event, which in turn coordinates cell growth, cell cycle entry, cell migration, and cell survival (1). PTEN reverses this process, and research studies have shown that the PI3K signaling pathway is constitutively activated in human cancers that have loss of function of PTEN (2). PI3Ks are composed of a catalytic subunit (p110) and a regulatory subunit. Various isoforms of the catalytic subunit (p110α, p110β, p110γ, and p110δ) have been isolated, and the regulatory subunits that associate with p110α, p110β, and p110δ are p85α and p85β (3). In contrast, p110γ associates with a p101 regulatory subunit that is unrelated to p85. Furthermore, p110γ is activated by βγ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Guinea Pig, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family of serine/threonine kinases is engaged in multiple cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, MAPK signaling, apoptotic signaling, control of phagocyte NADPH oxidase, and growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth (1,2). Several mechanisms that induce PAK activity have been reported. Binding of Rac/Cdc42 to the CRIB (or PBD) domain near the amino terminus of PAK causes autophosphorylation and conformational changes in PAK (1). Phosphorylation of PAK1 at Thr423 by PDK induces activation of PAK1 (3). Several autophosphorylation sites have been identified, including Ser199 and Ser204 of PAK1 and Ser192 and Ser197 of PAK2 (4,5). Because the autophosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal inhibitory domain, it has been hypothesized that modification in this region prevents the kinase from reverting to an inactive conformation (6). Research indicates that phosphorylation at Ser144 of PAK1 or Ser139 of PAK3 (located in the kinase inhibitory domain) affects kinase activity (7). Phosphorylation at Ser21 of PAK1 or Ser20 of PAK2 regulates binding with the adaptor protein Nck (8). PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 have lower sequence similarity with PAK1-3 in the amino-terminal regulatory region (9). Phosphorylation at Ser474 of PAK4, a site analogous to Thr423 of PAK1, may play a pivotal role in regulating the activity and function of PAK4 (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MOB1 was first identified in yeast as a protein that binds to Mps with essential roles in the completion of mitosis and the maintenance of ploidy (1). Its Drosophila and mammalian homologs, Mats and MOB1, respectively, are involved in the Hippo signaling tumor suppressor pathway, which plays a critical role in organ size regulation and which has been implicated in cancer development (2-5). There are two MOB1 proteins in humans, MOB1α and MOB1β, that are encoded by two different genes but which have greater than 95% amino acid sequence identity (6). Both forms bind to members of the nuclear Dbf2-related (NDR) kinases, such as LATS1/2 and NDR1/2, thereby stimulating kinase activity (7-9). This binding is promoted by the phosphorylation of MOB1 at several threonine residues by MST1 and/or MST2 (5,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ribosomal protein S3 (rpS3) is a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit and is involved in translation. HSP90 interacts with both the amino-terminus and carboxy-terminus of rpS3, preventing its ubiquitination and degradation and thereby retaining the integrity of the ribosome (1). rpS3 has also been shown to function as an endonuclease during DNA damage repair (2,3). Furthermore, overexpression of rpS3 sensitizes lymphocytic cells to cytokine-induced apoptosis, indicating a third role for rpS3 during apoptosis (4). The functions of rpS3 during DNA damage repair and apoptosis have been mapped to two distinct domains (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TMS1 (target of methylation-induced silencing)/ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD), also referred to as PYCARD and CARD5, is a 22-kDa pro-apoptotic protein containing an N-terminal pyrin domain (PYD) and a C-terminal caspase recruitment domain (CARD) (1-2). The ASC/TMS1 gene was originally found to be aberrantly methylated and silenced in breast cancer cells (2), and has since been found to be silenced in a number of other cancers, including ovarian cancer (3), glioblastoma (4), melanoma (5), gastric cancer (6), lung cancer (7), and prostate cancer (8). Expression of ASC/TMS1 can be induced by pro-apoptotic/inflammatory stimuli (9). During apoptosis ASC/TMS1 is re-distributed from the cytosol to the mitochondria and associates with mitochondrial Bax to trigger cytochrome c release and subsequent apoptosis (10). ASC/TMS1 has also been found to be a critical component of inflammatory signaling where it associates with and activates caspase-1 in response to pro-inflammatory signals (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: YY1 (Yin Yang1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor with fundamental roles in embryogenesis, differentiation, replication and proliferation. YY1 contains four zinc finger motifs of the Cys-Cys-His-His type and can activate different eukaryotic genes (such as CREB, c-myc, Histone H4, p53 and PARP-1) or repress different eukaryotic genes (such as α-actin, IFN-β and IFN-γ) as well as regulate some viral promoters (1). YY1 deficient embryos die approximately at the time of implantation, suggesting that YY1 has an essential role in embryonic development (2). YY1 is overexpressed in cancer cells such as prostate cancer and therefore may be considered a prognostic marker (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen is a polysaccharide of glucose and serves as an energy storage in mammalian muscle and liver (1). Glycogen synthase catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen biosynthesis and has two major isoforms in mammals -- muscle isoform (GYS1) and liver isoform (GYS2) respectively (1). Glycogen synthase kinase-3α (GSK-3α) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylate glycogen synthase at multiple sites in its C-terminus (Ser641, Ser645, Ser649 and Ser653) inhibiting its activity (2, 3). Hypoxia alters glycogen metabolism including temporal changes of GYS1 expression and phosphorylation in cancer cells, suggesting the role of metabolic reprogramming of glycogen metabolism in cancer growth (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mitochondrial fission factor (MFF) is a tail-anchored protein that resides within the outer mitochondrial membrane and is part of the mitochondrial fission complex. MFF participates in mitochondrial fission by serving as one of multiple receptors for the GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) (1-4). Research studies have also shown that MFF is a peroxisomal membrane protein and participates in peroxisome fission by serving as a receptor for another GTPase, dynamin-like protein 1 (5,6).

$208
10 x 50 ug
500 µg
MitoTracker® Deep Red FM is well retained after fixation allowing for further sample processing and immunostaining. Excitation: 644 nm, Emission: 665 nm, Molecular Weight: 543.58 g/mol
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).