Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Product listing: SimpleChIP® Human EP300 Promoter Primers, UniProt ID Q09472 #12281 to Histone H3 (D1H2) XP® Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate), UniProt ID P68431 #12230

$108
250 PCR reactions
500 µl
SimpleChIP® Human EP300 Promoter Primers contain a mix of forward and reverse PCR primers that are specific to a region of the human EP300 promoter. These primers can be used to amplify DNA that has been isolated using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Primers have been optimized for use in SYBR® Green quantitative real-time PCR and have been tested in conjunction with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kits #9002 and #9003 and ChIP-validated antibodies from Cell Signaling Technology®. The EP300 gene encodes for p300, an acetyltransferase that, in combination with CBP, enhances transcriptional activation by acetylating various histones and other proteins.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to either identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome or to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). ChIP can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors, and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. Fragmented chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or quantitative real-time PCR are often used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq), or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8). SimpleChIP® primers have been optimized for amplification of ChIP-isolated DNA using real-time quantitative PCR and provide important positive and negative controls that can be used to confirm a successful ChIP experiment.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MKK3 and MKK6 are two closely related dual-specificity protein kinases that activate p38 MAP kinase (1-5). MKK3 and MKK6 both phosphorylate and activate p38 MAP kinase at its activation site, Thr-Gly-Tyr, but do not phosphorylate or activate Erk1/2 or SAPK/JNK. Phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase dramatically stimulates its ability to phosphorylate protein substrates such as ATF-2 and Elk-1. MKK3 and MKK6 are both activated by different forms of cellular stress and inflammatory cytokines (4,5). Activation of MKK3 and MKK6 occurs through phosphorylation at Ser189 and Thr222 on MKK3 (2) and Ser207 and Thr211 on MKK6 (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), which contains five immunoglobulin-like domains, is a highly glycosylated protein (1). MAG is a component of all myelinated internodes, whether formed by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) or by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) (2), and has several functions. A known function of MAG is its inhibition of axonal regeneration after injury. It inhibits axonal outgrowth from adult dorsal root ganglion and in postnatal cerebellar, retinal, spinal, hippocampal, and superior cervical ganglion neurons (3). Interaction between MAG and several other molecules on the innermost wrap of myelin and complementary receptors on the opposing axon surface are required for long-term axon stability. Without MAG, myelin is still expressed, but long-term axon degeneration and altered axon cytoskeleton structure can be seen (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: β1-Adrenergic Receptor (β1AR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in the regulation of cardiovascular functions (1). Together with β2AR, β1AR is a major βAR in the heart. β1AR is activated by catecholamines and couples to Gαs protein, activating adenylate cyclase and increasing intracellular cAMP levels (2). Beta-blockers (βAR antagonists), one of the major class of therapeutics in cardiovascular medicine, act mostly by preventing catecholamine binding to β1AR (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Synaptophysin (SYP) is a neuronal synaptic vesicle glycoprotein that is expressed in neuroendocrine cells and neoplasms (1). Synaptophysin contains four transmembrane domains that form a hexameric channel or gap junction-like pore (2). Synaptophysin binds to the SNARE protein synaptobrevin/VAMP, which prevents the inclusion of synaptobrevin in the synaptic vesicle fusion complex and creates a pool of synaptobrevin for exocytosis when synapse activity increases (3). Synaptophysin is also responsible for targeting synaptobrevin 2/VAMP2 to synaptic vesicles, a critical component of the fusion complex (4).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Chk1 (Ser345) (133D3) Rabbit mAb #2348.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Chk1 kinase acts downstream of ATM/ATR kinase and plays an important role in DNA damage checkpoint control, embryonic development, and tumor suppression (1). Activation of Chk1 involves phosphorylation at Ser317 and Ser345 by ATM/ATR, followed by autophosphorylation of Ser296. Activation occurs in response to blocked DNA replication and certain forms of genotoxic stress (2). While phosphorylation at Ser345 serves to localize Chk1 to the nucleus following checkpoint activation (3), phosphorylation at Ser317 along with site-specific phosphorylation of PTEN allows for re-entry into the cell cycle following stalled DNA replication (4). Chk1 exerts its checkpoint mechanism on the cell cycle, in part, by regulating the cdc25 family of phosphatases. Chk1 phosphorylation of cdc25A targets it for proteolysis and inhibits its activity through 14-3-3 binding (5). Activated Chk1 can inactivate cdc25C via phosphorylation at Ser216, blocking the activation of cdc2 and transition into mitosis (6). Centrosomal Chk1 has been shown to phosphorylate cdc25B and inhibit its activation of CDK1-cyclin B1, thereby abrogating mitotic spindle formation and chromatin condensation (7). Furthermore, Chk1 plays a role in spindle checkpoint function through regulation of aurora B and BubR1 (8). Research studies have implicated Chk1 as a drug target for cancer therapy as its inhibition leads to cell death in many cancer cell lines (9).

PTMScan® Technology employs a proprietary methodology from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) for peptide enrichment by immunoprecipitation using a specific bead-conjugated antibody in conjunction with liquid chromatography (LC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for quantitative profiling of post-translational modification (PTM) sites in cellular proteins. These include phosphorylation (PhosphoScan®), ubiquitination (UbiScan®), acetylation (AcetylScan®), and methylation (MethylScan®), among others. PTMScan® Technology enables researchers to isolate, identify, and quantitate large numbers of post-translationally modified cellular peptides with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, providing a global overview of PTMs in cell and tissue samples without preconceived biases about where these modified sites occur (1). For more information on PTMScan® Proteomics Services, please visit www.cellsignal.com/common/content/content.jsp?id=ptmscan-services.
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Negative Elongation Factor (NELF) consists of four subunits: WHSC2 (NELF-A), COBRA-1 (NELF-B), TH1L (NELF-C/D), and NELF-E (1). NELF, together with DRB-sensitivity inducing factor (DSIF), inhibits RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) elongation resulting in RNAPII promoter proximal pausing, where it waits additional signaling to resume transcription (2,3). The release of RNAPII from promoter proximal pausing is a critical regulatory point during transcription and is signaled by positive transcription elongation factor (p-TEF-b) phosphorylation of both NELF and the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) within the largest subunit of RNAPII (3,4). WHSC2 is thought to connect the NELF complex to RNAPII machinery, while NELF-E contains an RNA binding motif that is necessary for NELF function (1,5,6). TH1L, together with COBRA-1, are integral subunits that bring WHSC2 and NELF-E together in the NELF complex (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyses the first, and rate-limiting, step of the pentose phosphate pathway (1). The NADPH generated from this reaction is essential to protect cells from oxidative stress (1). Research studies have shown that p53 interacts with G6PD and inhibits its activity, therefore suppressing glucose consumption through the pentose phosphate pathway (2). In cancer cells with p53 mutations, the increased glucose consumption is directed towards increased biosynthesis, which is critical for cancer cell proliferation (2).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated β-Actin (8H10D10) Mouse mAb #3700.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CD8+ cytotoxic T cells recognize peptides presented by MHC class I molecules on the surface of infected cells and tumor cells. The transporters associated with antigen processing 1 and 2 (TAP1 and TAP2) form the TAP complex which resides on the ER membrane and transports peptides from the cytoplasm into the ER for loading onto MHC class I molecules (1-8). In addition, TAP localized to endosomal membranes is important for cross-presentation by dendritic cells (9,10). IFN-γ produced by T cells and NK cells in response to infection causes upregulation of TAP1 and TAP2, resulting in increased antigen presentation to T cells (11). Some viral proteins inhibit TAP function or downregulate TAP expression resulting in viral immune evasion (12,13). In addition, investigators have observed reduced TAP expression in a variety of tumor types, and it is thought to be one mechanism for tumor immune evasion (14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: E2A is a member of the E-protein family of transcription factors, a subclass of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that bind specifically to E-box consensus sequences (1,2). Alternative splicing generates two E2A isoforms (E47 and E12) that are actively involved in B cell lineage commitment, B cell maturation, IgK V-J rearrangement, peripheral B cell development, and tumor suppression (3). E2A acts in cis during G1 to promote immunoglobulin gene diversification (4). Research studies have shown that chromosomal translocations involving the E2A gene result in the expression of multiple fusion proteins and are associated with many cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (5).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® c-Raf siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit c-Raf expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: A-Raf, B-Raf, and c-Raf (Raf-1) are the main effectors recruited by GTP-bound Ras to activate the MEK-MAP kinase pathway (1). Activation of c-Raf is the best understood and involves phosphorylation at multiple activating sites including Ser338, Tyr341, Thr491, Ser494, Ser497, and Ser499 (2). p21-activated protein kinase (PAK) has been shown to phosphorylate c-Raf at Ser338, and the Src family phosphorylates Tyr341 to induce c-Raf activity (3,4). Ser338 of c-Raf corresponds to similar sites in A-Raf (Ser299) and B-Raf (Ser445), although this site is constitutively phosphorylated in B-Raf (5). Inhibitory 14-3-3 binding sites on c-Raf (Ser259 and Ser621) can be phosphorylated by Akt and AMPK, respectively (6,7). While A-Raf, B-Raf, and c-Raf are similar in sequence and function, differential regulation has been observed (8). Of particular interest, B-Raf contains three consensus Akt phosphorylation sites (Ser364, Ser428, and Thr439) and lacks a site equivalent to Tyr341 of c-Raf (8,9). Research studies have shown that the B-Raf mutation V600E results in elevated kinase activity and is commonly found in malignant melanoma (10). Six residues of c-Raf (Ser29, Ser43, Ser289, Ser296, Ser301, and Ser642) become hyperphosphorylated in a manner consistent with c-Raf inactivation. The hyperphosphorylation of these six sites is dependent on downstream MEK signaling and renders c-Raf unresponsive to subsequent activation events (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions, such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamins have been subdivided into types A and B. Type-A lamins consist of lamin A and C, which arise from alternative splicing of the lamin A gene LMNA. Lamin A and C are cleaved by caspases into large (41-50 kDa) and small (28 kDa) fragments, which can be used as markers for apoptosis (4,5). Type-B lamins consist of lamin B1 and B2, encoded by separate genes (6-8). Lamin B1 is also cleaved by caspases during apoptosis (9). Research studies have shown that duplication of the lamin B1 gene LMNB1 is correlated with pathogenesis of the neurological disorder adult-onset leukodystrophy (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Plectin is a large, widely expressed protein that crosslinks the intermediate filament and actin cytoskeleton, mechanically stabilizing cells and tissues. Plectin also plays a role in the regulation of actin dynamics and acts as a scaffold for signaling molecules (1). Plectin is important in the stabilization of hemidesmosomes, crosslinking them to the intermediate filament network. Research studies have shown that mutations in plectin and other genes coding for hemidesmosomal proteins can cause epidermolysis bullosa, a condition manifested by fragile skin and frequent blistering (1,2). Plectin modulates signals to PKC through binding and sequestration of RACK1, the receptor for activated C kinase 1 (3,4). Plectin is also involved in the regulation of cytokeratin architecture and cell stress response (4), signaling through the chemokine receptor CXCR4 (5) and regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and signaling in mouse myotubes (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane, translocates fatty acids across the mitochondrial membranes and catalyzes the rate-limiting step of β-oxidation (1, 2). There are three isoforms of this enzyme: CPT1A (liver), CPT1B (muscle), and CPT1C (brain) (1, 2). Deficiency of CPT1A results in an autosomal recessive mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorder (3). Studies have shown that physiological high blood glucose and insulin levels inhibit CPT1B activity in human muscle and therefore divert long-chain fatty acids toward storage in human muscle as triglycerides (4). Furthermore, mice deficient in CPT1C show less food intake and reduced body weight (5). These findings suggest that CPT1 may play a role in metabolic syndromes.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF, CSF-1) receptor is an integral membrane tyrosine kinase encoded by the c-fms proto-oncogene. M-CSF receptor is expressed in monocytes (macrophages and their progenitors) and drives growth and development of this blood cell lineage. (1-3). Binding of M-CSF to its receptor induces receptor dimerization, activation, and autophosphorylation of cytoplasmic tyrosine residues used as docking sites for SH2-containing signaling proteins (4). There are at least five major tyrosine autophosphorylation sites. Tyr723 (Tyr721 in mouse) is located in the kinase insert (KI) region. Phosphorylated Tyr723 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase as well as PLCγ2 (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr809 provides a docking site for Shc (5). Overactivation of this receptor can lead to a malignant phenotype in various cell systems (6). The activated M-CSF receptor has been shown to be a predictor of poor outcome in advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma (7) and breast cancer (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the activation component E1; the activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2 and then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the epsilon-NH2 of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). Combinatorial interactions of different E2 and E3 proteins result in substrate specificity (4). Recent data suggests that activated E2 associates transiently with E3, and the dissociation is a critical step for ubiquitination (5). S phase kinase-associated protein 1 (Skp1) is a critical scaffold protein of the Skp1/CUL1/F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase protein complex. Various F-box proteins (e.g., β-TrCP, Skp2) mediate an interaction with Skp1, via their defining and conserved domain of 40 amino acids, and with substrates to be ubiquitinated (e.g., β-catenin, p27) (4).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Ras family small GTPase Ran is involved in nuclear envelope formation, assembly of the mitotic spindle, and nuclear transport (1,2). TPX2, a target of active Ran (RanGTP), is a microtubule nucleating protein. TPX2 is inactive when bound to nuclear importin-alpha. RanGTP activity disrupts this interaction, relieving inhibition of TPX2 (3). TPX2 binding activates Aurora A kinase and promotes its localization to the mitotic spindle (4,5). DNA damage in mitosis leads to loss of interaction between Aurora A and TPX2 and inactivation of Aurora A kinase (6). TPX2 is highly expressed in pancreatic cancer cells, and knockdown of TPX2 expression in these cells is associated with increased sensitivity to paclitaxel (7).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Di-Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys27) (D18C8) XP® Rabbit mAb #9728.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Developmentally-regulated brain proteins (Drebrins) are cytoplasmic proteins that were originally identified in the brain as F-actin-binding proteins. There are two mammalian isoforms: adult type (A) and embryonic type (E). These isoforms are derived from a single gene through alternative RNA splicing mechanisms (1). Drebrin E has been observed to accumulate in the developmental stage of migrating neurons and in the growing cell processes of neurons. Drebrin A is found at the dendritic spines of mature cortical neurons where it plays a role in synaptic plasticity (2,3). Although drebrins are primarily found in neurons, they have also been found in skeletal muscle, heart, pancreas, and kidney. Research studies have shown that reduced expression of drebrin in the brain could be associated with Alzheimer’s Disease, Down Syndrome (4), and bipolar disorders (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), one of the major caspase-1 targets, is a multifunctional cytokine that is involved in a host of immune and proinflammatory responses (1). It is produced primarily by activated monocytes and macrophages. It signals through various adaptor proteins and kinases that lead to activation of numerous downstream targets (2-6). Human IL-1β is synthesized as a 31 kDa precursor. To gain activity, the precursor must be cleaved by caspase-1 between Asp116 and Ala117 to yield a 17 kDa mature form (7,8). Detection of the 17 kDa mature form of IL-1β is a good indicator of caspase-1 activity.

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® SirT1 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit SirT1 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a T cell stimulatory cytokine best known for inducing T cell proliferation and NK cell proliferation and activation (1,2). IL-2 also promotes peripheral development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) (3,4). Conversely, IL-2 is involved in the activation-induced cell death (AICD) that is observed post T cell expansion by increasing levels of Fas on CD4+ T cells (5). The effects of IL-2 are mediated through a trimeric receptor complex consisting of IL-2Rα, IL-2Rβ, and the common gamma chain, γc (1,2). IL-2Rα binds exclusively to IL-2 with low affinity and increases the binding affinity of the whole receptor complex including IL-2Rβ and γc subunits. IL-15 also binds to IL-2Rβ (1,2). γc is used by other cytokines including IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21 (1,2). Binding of IL-2 initiates signaling cascades involving Jak1, Jak3, Stat5, and the PI3K/Akt pathways (1,2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Calcium is a universal signaling molecule involved in many cellular functions such as cell motility, metabolism, protein modification, protein folding, and apoptosis. Calcium is stored in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where it is buffered by calcium binding chaperones such as calnexin and calreticulin, and is released via the IP3 Receptor channel (1). Calreticulin also functions as an ER chaperone that ensures proper folding and quality control of newly synthesized glycoproteins. As such, calreticulin presumably does not alter protein folding but regulates proper timing for efficient folding and subunit assembly. Furthermore, calreticulin retains proteins in non-native conformation within the ER and targets them for degradation (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Syndecans are a family of type 1 transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycans comprising 4 members in mammals (SDC-1 to -4) (1) encoded by four syndecan genes. Syndecans are involved in embryonic development, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis (2). The extracellular domain harbors attachment sites for heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains, facilitating interaction with an array of proteins including a plethora of growth factors. In addition, the hydrophobic C-terminal intracellular domain can interact with proteins containing a PDZ domain (2). These interactions place syndecans as important integrators of membrane signaling (3). Syndecans undergo proteolytic cleavage causing the release of their extracellular domain (shedding), converting the membrane-bound proteins into soluble molecular effectors (4).

PTMScan® Technology employs a proprietary methodology from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) for peptide enrichment by immunoprecipitation using a specific bead-conjugated antibody in conjunction with liquid chromatography (LC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for quantitative profiling of post-translational modification (PTM) sites in cellular proteins. These include phosphorylation (PhosphoScan®), ubiquitination (UbiScan®), acetylation (AcetylScan®), and methylation (MethylScan®), among others. PTMScan® Technology enables researchers to isolate, identify, and quantitate large numbers of post-translationally modified cellular peptides with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, providing a global overview of PTMs in cell and tissue samples without preconceived biases about where these modified sites occur (1). For more information on PTMScan® Proteomics Services, please visit www.cellsignal.com/common/content/content.jsp?id=ptmscan-services.

Background: Arginine methylation is a prevalent PTM found on both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. Arginine methylated proteins are involved in many different cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, signal transduction, RNA metabolism, and DNA damage repair (1-3). Arginine methylation is carried out by the arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) family of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to a guanidine nitrogen of arginine (4). There are three different types of arginine methylation: asymmetric dimethylarginine (aDMA, omega-NG,NG-dimethylarginine), where two methyl groups are placed on one of the terminal nitrogen atoms of the guanidine group of arginine; symmetric dimethylarginine (sDMA, omega-NG,N’G-dimethylarginine), where one methyl group is placed on each of the two terminal guanidine nitrogens of arginine; and monomethylarginine (MMA, omega-NG-dimethylarginine), where a single methyl group is placed on one of the terminal nitrogen atoms of arginine. Each of these modifications has potentially different functional consequences. Though all PRMT proteins catalyze the formation of MMA, Type I PRMTs (PRMT1, 3, 4, and 6) add an additional methyl group to produce aDMA, while Type II PRMTs (PRMT5 and 7) produce sDMA. Methylated arginine residues often reside in glycine-arginine rich (GAR) protein domains, such as RGG, RG, and RXR repeats (5). However, PRMT4/CARM1 and PRMT5 methylate arginine residues within proline-glycine-methionine rich (PGM) motifs (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Histone H3 (D1H2) XP® Rabbit mAb #4499.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).