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Product listing: Max (S20) Antibody, UniProt ID P61244 #4739 to p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) (137F5) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P27361 #4695

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Actin nucleation, the formation of new actin filaments from existing filaments, affects actin filament structure during cell motility, division, and intracellular trafficking. An important actin nucleation protein complex is the highly conserved ARP2/3 complex, consisting of ARP2, ARP3, and ARPC1-5. The ARP2/3 complex promotes branching of an existing actin filament and formation of a daughter filament following activation by nucleation-promoting factors, such as WASP/WAVE or cortactin (1). The formation of podosomes, small cellular projections that degrade the extracellular matrix, is enhanced by ARP2/3 complex action. ARP2/3 competes with caldesmon, an actin binding protein shown to negatively affect podosome formation (2). Along with N-WASP, the ARP2/3 complex regulates nuclear actin filament nucleation and controls actin polymerization during transcription (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The origin recognition complex (ORC) is a highly conserved heterohexameric protein complex that associates with DNA at or near initiation of DNA replication sites. All six ORC subunits are essential for initiation of DNA replication (1-3), and ORC may be involved in regulation of gene expression in response to stress (4). ORC binding to DNA permits the ordered binding of other proteins such as cdc6 and MCMs to form pre-replication complexes (Pre-RCs). Pre-RCs form between telophase and early G1 phase of the cell cycle and are inactivated at the onset of DNA synthesis, allowing coordinated regulation of DNA replication and cell division (5). Modification of one or more of the six ORC subunits may be responsible for its inactivation during S phase, but the chromatin binding behavior of the ORC subunits during the cell division cycle is still under investigation (6-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The origin recognition complex (ORC) is a highly conserved heterohexameric protein complex that associates with DNA at or near initiation of DNA replication sites. All six ORC subunits are essential for initiation of DNA replication (1-3), and ORC may be involved in regulation of gene expression in response to stress (4). ORC binding to DNA permits the ordered binding of other proteins such as cdc6 and MCMs to form pre-replication complexes (Pre-RCs). Pre-RCs form between telophase and early G1 phase of the cell cycle and are inactivated at the onset of DNA synthesis, allowing coordinated regulation of DNA replication and cell division (5). Modification of one or more of the six ORC subunits may be responsible for its inactivation during S phase, but the chromatin binding behavior of the ORC subunits during the cell division cycle is still under investigation (6-7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is a large multi-protein complex that functions as a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, catalyzing the transcription of DNA into RNA using the four ribonucleoside triphosphates as substrates (1). The largest subunit, RNAPII subunit B1 (Rpb1), also known as RNAPII subunit A (POLR2A), contains a unique heptapeptide sequence (Tyr1,Ser2,Pro3,Thr4,Ser5,Pro6,Ser7), which is repeated up to 52 times in the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein (1). This CTD heptapeptide repeat is subject to multiple post-translational modifications, which dictate the functional state of the polymerase complex. Phosphorylation of the CTD during the active transcription cycle integrates transcription with chromatin remodeling and nascent RNA processing by regulating the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes and RNA processing proteins to the transcribed gene (1). During transcription initiation, RNAPII contains a hypophosphorylated CTD and is recruited to gene promoters through interactions with DNA-bound transcription factors and the Mediator complex (1). The escape of RNAPII from gene promoters requires phosphorylation at Ser5 by CDK7, the catalytic subunit of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) (2). Phosphorylation at Ser5 mediates the recruitment of RNA capping enzymes, in addition to histone H3 Lys4 methyltransferases, which function to regulate transcription initiation and chromatin structure (3,4). After promoter escape, RNAPII proceeds down the gene to an intrinsic pause site, where it is halted by the negative elongation factors NELF and DSIF (5). At this point, RNAPII is unstable and frequently aborts transcription and dissociates from the gene. Productive transcription elongation requires phosphorylation at Ser2 by CDK9, the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor P-TEFb (6). Phosphorylation at Ser2 creates a stable transcription elongation complex and facilitates recruitment of RNA splicing and polyadenylation factors, in addition to histone H3 Lys36 methyltransferases, which function to promote elongation-compatible chromatin (7,8). Ser2/Ser5-phosphorylated RNAPII then transcribes the entire length of the gene to the 3' end, where transcription is terminated. RNAPII dissociates from the DNA and is recycled to the hypophosphorylated form by various CTD phosphatases (1).In addition to Ser2/Ser5 phosphorylation, Ser7 of the CTD heptapeptide repeat is also phosphorylated during the active transcription cycle. Phosphorylation at Ser7 is required for efficient transcription of small nuclear (sn) RNA genes (9,10). snRNA genes, which are neither spliced nor poly-adenylated, are structurally different from protein-coding genes. Instead of a poly(A) signal found in protein-coding RNAs, snRNAs contain a conserved 3'-box RNA processing element, which is recognized by the Integrator snRNA 3' end processing complex (11,12). Phosphorylation at Ser7 by CDK7 during the early stages of transcription facilitates recruitment of RPAP2, which dephosphorylates Ser5, creating a dual Ser2/Ser7 phosphorylation mark that facilitates recruitment of the Integrator complex and efficient processing of nascent snRNA transcripts (13-15).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The origin recognition complex (ORC) is a highly conserved heterohexameric protein complex that associates with DNA at or near initiation of DNA replication sites. All six ORC subunits are essential for initiation of DNA replication (1-3), and ORC may be involved in regulation of gene expression in response to stress (4). ORC binding to DNA permits the ordered binding of other proteins such as cdc6 and MCMs to form pre-replication complexes (Pre-RCs). Pre-RCs form between telophase and early G1 phase of the cell cycle and are inactivated at the onset of DNA synthesis, allowing coordinated regulation of DNA replication and cell division (5). Modification of one or more of the six ORC subunits may be responsible for its inactivation during S phase, but the chromatin binding behavior of the ORC subunits during the cell division cycle is still under investigation (6-7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Pim proteins (Pim-1, Pim-2 and Pim-3) are oncogene-encoded serine/threonine kinases (1). Pim-1, a serine/threonine kinase highly expressed in hematopoietic cells, plays a critical role in the transduction of mitogenic signals and is rapidly induced by a variety of growth factors and cytokines (1-4). Pim-1 cooperates with c-Myc in lymphoid cell transformation and protects cells from growth factor withdrawal and genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis (5,6). Pim-1 also enhances the transcriptional activity of c-Myb through direct phosphorylation within the c-Myb DNA binding domain as well as phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivator p100 (7,8). Hypermutations of the Pim-1 gene are found in B-cell diffuse large cell lymphomas (9). Phosphorylation of Pim-1 at Tyr218 by Etk occurs following IL-6 stimulation and correlates with an increase in Pim-1 activity (10). Various Pim substrates have been identified; Bad is phosphorylated by both Pim-1 and Pim-2 at Ser112 and this phosphorylation reverses Bad-induced cell apoptosis (11,12).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Chimerins are a family of GTPase-activating proteins (GAPS) that facilitate GTP hydrolysis by the small GTPase Rac, rendering it inactive and regulating cell shape, spreading and motility. Regulation of chimerin proteins occurs in response to growth factor receptor or G-protein coupled receptor activation followed by phospholipase C activation. Chimerins are among the growing number of phorbol ester and diacylglycerol (DAG) effector molecules that do not belong to the PKC family of isoenzymes (reviewed in 1,2). β2-chimerin is highly expressed in brain and pancreas, and its expression is down-regulated in malignant gliomas (3). β2-chimerin is also down-regulated in breast cancer, and its expression causes GAP activity-dependent cell cycle arrest in MCF-7 breast cancer cells (4). Signaling from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activates β2-chimerin and allows its association with Rac1 at the plasma membrane (5). Also in response to EGF, diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) γ interacts with β2-chimerin, promotes its translocation to the plasma membrane, and regulate its GAP activity (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication is a stringently regulated process that requires the cooperation of many proteins and protein complexes to occur efficiently, at the origins of replication, and once per cell cycle. The initiation of DNA replication requires a protein complex composed of two DNA polymerase α subunits and a pair of primase subunits. Primase activity catalyzes de novo synthesis of an RNA/DNA primer (initiator DNA) on the leading and lagging strands, while polymerase activity extends the initiator DNA (1). The 48 and 58 kDa primase subunits cooperate in the synthesis of small RNA primers. p48 is the catalytically active subunit (2), while p58 couples p48 to the polymerase to allow the transfer of primers to the active site. The p58 subunit may also play a role in regulation of primer length (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication is a stringently regulated process that requires the cooperation of many proteins and protein complexes to occur efficiently, at the origins of replication, and once per cell cycle. The initiation of DNA replication requires a protein complex composed of two DNA polymerase α subunits and a pair of primase subunits. Primase activity catalyzes de novo synthesis of an RNA/DNA primer (initiator DNA) on the leading and lagging strands, while polymerase activity extends the initiator DNA (1). The 48 and 58 kDa primase subunits cooperate in the synthesis of small RNA primers. p48 is the catalytically active subunit (2), while p58 couples p48 to the polymerase to allow the transfer of primers to the active site. The p58 subunit may also play a role in regulation of primer length (3,4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Snail is a zinc-finger transcription factor that can repress E-cadherin transcription. Downregulation of E-cadherin is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition during embryonic development, a process also exploited by invasive cancer cells (1-3). Indeed, loss of E-cadherin expression is correlated with the invasive properties of some tumors and there is a considerable inverse correlation between Snail and E-cadherin mRNA levels in epithelial tumor cell lines (4,5). In addition, Snail blocks the cell cycle and confers resistance to cell death (6). Phosphorylation of Snail by GSK-3 and PAK1 regulates its stability, cellular localization and function (7-10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Aurora A (AIK) is a cell cycle-regulated Ser/Thr protein kinase that is overexpressed in many tumor cell lines (1-3). Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 within the kinase activation loop results in a significant increase in its activity and may target the protein for proteasomal degradation during mitosis (4). The closely-related kinase Aurora B (AIM1) has been implicated in multiple mitotic events (5), and siRNA silencing of Aurora B expression results in reduced histone H3 phosphorylation, aberrant chromosome alignment/segregation, and altered survivin localization (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The highly conserved receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), homologous to the β subunit of heterotrimeric G-proteins, was originally identified through its binding of active PKCβII and other classical PKC isoforms (1). RACK1 is a scaffold protein that recruits PKC and a wide range of other proteins to specific subcellular locations, promoting the formation of multiprotein complexes to induce and integrate various signaling pathways (reviewed in 2). One example of this is its enhancement of PKC-dependent JNK activation (3). RACK1 protein also resides in the eukaryotic ribosome, suggesting the possibility that RACK1 participates in the assembly of signaling complexes that regulate translation as well (reviewed in 4). RACK1 binds the SH2 domain of Src, and phosphorylation of RACK1 by Src occurs at Tyr228 after PKC activation (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are α/β heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins with distinct tissue distribution and overlaping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with the extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2).Several αV subfamily members, including αVβ3, αVβ5, αVβ1, are highly expressed in active endothelial cells and cancer cells (3-6) where they play a critical role in angiogenesis and tumor metastasis (7-9). Therefore, interest has focused on αV integrin as a key therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer (10-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are α/β heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins having distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2).The αVβ5 integrin is expressed in various tissues and cell types, including endothelia, epithelia and fibroblasts (4). It plays a role in matrix adhesion to VN, FN, SPARC and bone sialoprotein (5) and functions in the invasion of gliomas and metastatic carcinoma cells (6,7). αVβ5 integrin plays a major role in growth-factor-induced tumor angiogenesis, where cooperative signaling by the αVβ5 integrin and growth factors regulates endothelial cell proliferation and survival (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are α/β heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins with distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2).Integrin β4 pairs with integrin α6 on the cell surface membrane to form the integrin α6β4 heterodimer, an important laminin receptor that is essential for hemidesmosome formation and the support of stable adhesions between basal epithelial cells and the basement membrane (4,5). Integrin β4 is an important component in several growth factor induced signaling pathways that are involved in tumorigenesis and invasive cell growth (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are α/β heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins with distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with the extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2).The β1 subfamily includes 12 distinct integrin proteins that bind to different extracellular matrix molecules (4). Control of extracellular integrin binding influences cell adhesion and migration, while intracellular signaling messages relayed by the β1 cytoplasmic tail help to regulate cell proliferation, cytoskeletal reorganization, and gene expression (4). Research studies have implicated β1 integrin in various activities including embryonic development, blood vessel, skin, bone, and muscle formation, as well as tumor metastasis and angiogenesis (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are α/β heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins with distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with the extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2).Integrin α5/β1 is involved in multiple biological processes including embryonic development, angiogenesis and tumor metastasis (4,5). By interaction with its fibronectin ligand, α5/β1 transduces signals that regulate cell adhesion, migration, matrix assembly and cytoskeletal organization (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins with distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with the extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2). αIIβ3 and αVβ3 are the two β3 containing integrins which are prominently expressed in hematopoietic cells and angiogenic endothelic cells and perform adhesive functions in hemostasis, wound healing and angiogenesis (1,4). Tyr773 and Tyr785 (usually referred to as Tyr747 and Tyr759 based on the chicken sequence) are phosphorylated upon ligand binding (5). Phosphorylation of these tyrosine residues is required for certain ligand-induced signaling (6). Thr779 (corresponding to Thr753 of the chicken sequence) of integrin β3 in the platelet specific αIIβ3 is phosphorylated by PKD and/or Akt, which may modulate integrin association with other signaling molecules (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) belongs to a family of RNA binding multiprotein complexes (hnRNP proteins) that facilitate pre-mRNA processing and transport of mRNA from the nucleus to cytoplasm (1-3). hnRNP K contains three unique structural motifs termed KH domains that bind poly(C) DNA and RNA sequences (4,5). Intricate architecture enables hnRNP K to facilitate mRNA biosynthesis (6), transcriptional regulation (7), and signal transduction. Research studies have shown that cytoplasmic hnRNP K expression is increased in oral squamous cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer, and may be a potential prognostic factor (8,9). hnRNP K coordinates with p53 to regulate its target gene transcription in response to DNA damage. Proteasome degradation of hnRNP K is mediated by E3 ligase MDM2 (10). The interaction between hnRNP K and c-Src leads to hnRNP K phosphorylation, which allows for hnRNP K activation of silenced mRNA translation (11).

Background: Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) were first identified as molecules that can induce ectopic bone and cartilage formation (1,2). BMPs are synthesized as precursor proteins that are processed by cleavage to produce mature proteins. BMPs initiate signaling by binding to a receptor complex containing type I and type II serine/threonine receptor kinases that then phosphorylate Smad (mainly Smad1, 5 and 8), resulting in the translocation of Smad to the nucleus. BMP was also reported to activate MAPK pathways in some systems (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a widely conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in many cellular programs, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, and death. The p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) signaling pathway can be activated in response to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli including mitogens, growth factors, and cytokines (1-3), and research investigators consider it an important target in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer (4). Upon stimulation, a sequential three-part protein kinase cascade is initiated, consisting of a MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK or MAP3K), a MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK or MAP2K), and a MAP kinase (MAPK). Multiple p44/42 MAP3Ks have been identified, including members of the Raf family, as well as Mos and Tpl2/COT. MEK1 and MEK2 are the primary MAPKKs in this pathway (5,6). MEK1 and MEK2 activate p44 and p42 through phosphorylation of activation loop residues Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr185/Tyr187, respectively. Several downstream targets of p44/42 have been identified, including p90RSK (7) and the transcription factor Elk-1 (8,9). p44/42 are negatively regulated by a family of dual-specificity (Thr/Tyr) MAPK phosphatases, known as DUSPs or MKPs (10), along with MEK inhibitors, such as U0126 and PD98059.

$111
20 µl
$260
200 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, Dog, Hamster, Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a widely conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in many cellular programs, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, and death. The p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) signaling pathway can be activated in response to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli including mitogens, growth factors, and cytokines (1-3), and research investigators consider it an important target in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer (4). Upon stimulation, a sequential three-part protein kinase cascade is initiated, consisting of a MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK or MAP3K), a MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK or MAP2K), and a MAP kinase (MAPK). Multiple p44/42 MAP3Ks have been identified, including members of the Raf family, as well as Mos and Tpl2/COT. MEK1 and MEK2 are the primary MAPKKs in this pathway (5,6). MEK1 and MEK2 activate p44 and p42 through phosphorylation of activation loop residues Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr185/Tyr187, respectively. Several downstream targets of p44/42 have been identified, including p90RSK (7) and the transcription factor Elk-1 (8,9). p44/42 are negatively regulated by a family of dual-specificity (Thr/Tyr) MAPK phosphatases, known as DUSPs or MKPs (10), along with MEK inhibitors, such as U0126 and PD98059.