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Product listing: Phospho-AMPKβ1 (Ser182) Antibody, UniProt ID Q9Y478 #4186 to AMPKβ2 Antibody, UniProt ID O43741 #4148

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: NAC1 or nuclear accumbens-1 is a nuclear factor that belongs to the POZ/BTB (Pox virus and zinc finger/bric-a-brac tramtrack broad complex) domain family. Also known as BTBD14B, it was originally identified in a unique neuronal forebrain structure responsible for reward motivation and addictive behaviors (1,2). NAC1 recruits HDAC3 and HDAC4 to transcriptionally repress gene expression in neuronal cells (3) and specifically co-represses other POZ/BTB proteins in the central nervous system (4). NAC1 is upregulated in several tumor types, including breast, renal cell, and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as high grade ovarian serous carcinoma, where it has long been suspected as a chemoresistance gene (5,6). The chemoresistance mechanism reportedly occurs through NAC1 negative regulation of the GADD45 pathway (7). NAC1 has also been described as part of the extended transcriptional network in pluripotent cells that involves Oct-4, Sox2, Nanog, Sall1, KLF4 and Sall4 (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and referred to as autophagy-related (Atg) genes. Formation of the autophagosome involves a ubiquitin-like conjugation system in which Atg12 is covalently bound to Atg5 and targeted to autophagosome vesicles (4-6). This conjugation reaction is mediated by the ubiquitin E1-like enzyme Atg7 and the E2-like enzyme Atg10 (7,8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: β-Catenin is a key downstream effector in the Wnt signaling pathway (1). It is implicated in two major biological processes in vertebrates: early embryonic development (2) and tumorigenesis (3). CK1 phosphorylates β-catenin at Ser45. This phosphorylation event primes β-catenin for subsequent phosphorylation by GSK-3β (4-6). GSK-3β destabilizes β-catenin by phosphorylating it at Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41 (7). Mutations at these sites result in the stabilization of β-catenin protein levels and have been found in many tumor cell lines (8).

Molecular Weight:616.84 g/mol

Background: TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) / PMA (phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate) is the most commonly used phorbol ester. It binds and activates protein kinase C, causing a wide range of effects in cells and tissues (1,2). TPA has been demonstrated to be a potent tumor promoter in mouse skin (3). Conversely, it has been shown to be an effective cancer therapeutic agent in myelocytic leukemia patients, and has been indicated as a potential colorectal cancer therapeutic (4-5). TPA has also been shown to increase white blood cell and neutrophil counts in solid tumor cancer patients (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fragile X syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by a spectrum of physical and behavioral features and is a frequent form of inherited mental retardation (1). X-linked FMRP (FMR-1) and its two autosomal homologs, FXR1 and FXR2, are polyribosome-associated RNA-binding proteins that are involved in the pathogenesis of fragile X syndrome (1-3). Each of the fragile X proteins can self-associate, as well as form heteromers with the other two related proteins (3). FMRP can act as a translation regulator and is a component of RNAi effector complexes (RISC), suggesting a role in gene silencing (4). The Drosophila homolog of FMRP (dFMRP) associates with Argonaute 2 (Ago2) and Dicer and can coimmunoprecipitate with miRNA and siRNA (5). These results suggest that fragile X syndrome is related to abnormal translation caused by defects in RNAi-related pathways. In addition, FMRP, FXR1, and FXR2 are components of stress granules (SG) and have been implicated in the translational regulation of mRNAs (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MKK7 is a MAP kinase kinase that serves as a specific activator of the SAPK/JNK pathway (1,2). MKK7 is strongly activated by TNF-α, as well as other environmental stresses, whereas SEK1/MKK4, which activates both p38 and SAPK/JNK pathways, is not activated by TNF-α (2). Sequence alignment of the activation loop of the MAP kinase kinase family members indicates that Ser271 and Thr275 are potential phosphorylation sites that are crucial for the kinase acivity.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MKK7 is a MAP kinase kinase that serves as a specific activator of the SAPK/JNK pathway (1,2). MKK7 is strongly activated by TNF-α, as well as other environmental stresses, whereas SEK1/MKK4, which activates both p38 and SAPK/JNK pathways, is not activated by TNF-α (2). Sequence alignment of the activation loop of the MAP kinase kinase family members indicates that Ser271 and Thr275 are potential phosphorylation sites that are crucial for the kinase acivity.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding domain (CHD) proteins have been identified in a variety of organisms (1,2). This family of proteins, which consists of nine members, has been divided into three separate subfamilies: subfamily I (CHD1 and CHD2), subfamily II (CHD3 and CHD4), and subfamily III (CHD5, CHD6, CHD7, CHD8, and CHD9). All of the CHD proteins contain two tandem N-terminal chromodomains, a SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain, and a C-terminal DNA binding domain (1,2). The chromodomains facilitate binding to methylated lysine residues of histone proteins and confer interactions with specific regions of chromatin. The SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain utilizes the energy from ATP hydrolysis to modify chromatin structure. CHD1 is a euchromatic protein that associates with the promoters of active genes, and is required for the maintenance of open chromatin and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (3-6). The two chromodomains of CHD1 facilitate its recruitment to active genes by binding to methyl-lysine 4 of histone H3, a mark associated with transcriptional activation (4-6). Yeast CHD1 is a component of the SAGA and SLIK histone acetyltransferase complexes, and is believed to link histone methylation with histone acetylation during transcriptional activation (6). The CHD2 protein is not well characterized; however, mouse knockout studies suggest important functions in development and tumor suppression. Homozygous CHD2 knockout mice exhibit delayed growth and perinatal lethality (7). Heterozygous knockout mice show increased mortality and gross organ abnormalities, in addition to increased extramedullary hematopoiesis and susceptibility to lymphomas (7,8). CHD2 mutant cells are defective in hematopoietic stem cell differentiation and exhibit aberrant DNA damage responses (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TFIIB (also known as GTF2B, TF2B and general transcription factor IIB) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor that plays a central role in the assembly of the transcription pre-initiation complex through direct recruitment of RNA polymerase II (1,2). TFIIB functions as a bridge between promoter-bound TFIID and RNA polymerase II. In addition to interacting with promoter-bound TFIID and TFIIA, TFIIB makes extensive contacts with the core promoter via two independent DNA-binding modules. TFIIB may also be a target of transcriptional activator proteins that act to stimulate pre-initiation complex assembly.

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The family of Trk receptor tyrosine kinases consists of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC. While the sequence of these family members is highly conserved, they are activated by different neurotrophins: TrkA by NGF, TrkB by BDNF or NT4, and TrkC by NT3 (1). Neurotrophin signaling through these receptors regulates a number of physiological processes, such as cell survival, proliferation, neural development, and axon and dendrite growth and patterning (1). In the adult nervous system, the Trk receptors regulate synaptic strength and plasticity. TrkA regulates proliferation and is important for development and maturation of the nervous system (2). Phosphorylation at Tyr490 is required for Shc association and activation of the Ras-MAP kinase cascade (3,4). Residues Tyr674/675 lie within the catalytic domain, and phosphorylation at these sites reflects TrkA kinase activity (3-6). Point mutations, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements (chimeras) cause ligand-independent receptor dimerization and activation of TrkA (7-10). TrkA is activated in many malignancies including breast, ovarian, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas (8-13). Research studies suggest that expression of TrkA in neuroblastomas may be a good prognostic marker as TrkA signals growth arrest and differentiation of cells originating from the neural crest (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GGA3 is a member of the GGA family of proteins which also includes GGA1 and GGA2. These proteins consist of four distinct segments: a VHS domain that binds the di-leucine sorting signal DXXLL; a GAT domain that binds Arf-GTP; a hinge region that recruits clathrin; and a GAE domain that has sequence similarity to γ-adaptin and recruits a number of proteins. Arf1-GTPase recruits GGA3 to the trans-Golgi network. GGAs sort acid hydrolases to the lysosome and are involved in transporting proteins containing the DXXLL signal from the Golgi complex to the endosome (1). During apoptosis or cerebral ischemia, GGA3 is cleaved by caspase-3 at Asp313, reducing GGA3 levels and lysosomal degradation of β-secretase (BACE). The resulting elevated amount and activity of BACE plays a role in amyloid-β (Aβ) production, consistent with BACE elevation and Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer’s Disease (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the pre-synaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g. NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing post-synaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels. In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion. Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) are characterized: EAAT2 (GLT-1) is primarily expressed in astrocytes but is also expressed in neurons of the retina and during fetal development (1). Homozygous EAAT2 knockout mice have spontaneous, lethal seizures and an increased predisposition to acute cortical injury (2). PKC phosphorylates Ser113 of EAAT2 and coincides with glutamate transport (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Pim proteins (Pim-1, Pim-2 and Pim-3) are oncogene-encoded serine/threonine kinases (1). Pim-1, a serine/threonine kinase highly expressed in hematopoietic cells, plays a critical role in the transduction of mitogenic signals and is rapidly induced by a variety of growth factors and cytokines (1-4). Pim-1 cooperates with c-Myc in lymphoid cell transformation and protects cells from growth factor withdrawal and genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis (5,6). Pim-1 also enhances the transcriptional activity of c-Myb through direct phosphorylation within the c-Myb DNA binding domain as well as phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivator p100 (7,8). Hypermutations of the Pim-1 gene are found in B-cell diffuse large cell lymphomas (9). Phosphorylation of Pim-1 at Tyr218 by Etk occurs following IL-6 stimulation and correlates with an increase in Pim-1 activity (10). Various Pim substrates have been identified; Bad is phosphorylated by both Pim-1 and Pim-2 at Ser112 and this phosphorylation reverses Bad-induced cell apoptosis (11,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The protein inhibitor of activated Stat (PIAS) proteins, which include PIAS1, PIAS3, PIASx, and PIASy, were originally characterized based on their interaction with the Stat family of transcription factors (1,2). PIAS1, PIAS3, and PIASx interact with and repress Stat1, Stat3, and Stat4, respectively (1-3). Deletion of PIAS1 leads to inhibition of interferon-inducible genes and increased protection against infection (4). The PIAS family contains a conserved RING domain that has been linked to a function as a small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) ligase, coupling the SUMO conjugating enzyme Ubc9 with its substrate proteins (5,6). Numerous studies have now shown that PIAS family members can regulate the activity of transcription factors through distinct mechanisms, including NF-κB (7,8), c-Jun, p53 (5,9), Oct-4 (10), and Smads (11,12). The activity of PIAS1 is regulated by both phosphorylation and arginine methylation. Inflammatory stimuli can induce IKK-mediated phosphorylation of PIAS1 at Ser90, which is required for its activity (13). In addition, PRMT1 induces arginine methylation of PIAS1 at Arg303 following interferon treatment and is associated with its repressive activity on Stat1 (14).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glucocorticoid hormones control cellular proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism through their association with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)/NR3C1, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors (1). GR is composed of several conserved structural elements, including a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain (which also contains residues critical for receptor dimerization and hormone-dependent gene transactivation), a neighboring hinge region containing nuclear localization signals, a central zinc-finger-containing DNA-binding domain, and an amino-terminal variable region that participates in ligand-independent gene transcription. In the absence of hormone, a significant population of GR is localized to the cytoplasm in an inactive form via its association with regulatory chaperone proteins, such as HSP90, HSP70, and FKBP52. On hormone binding, GR is released from the chaperone complex and translocates to the nucleus as a dimer to associate with specific DNA sequences termed glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), thereby enhancing or repressing transcription of specific target genes (2). It was demonstrated that GR-mediated transcriptional activation is modulated by phosphorylation (3-5). Although GR can be basally phosphorylated in the absence of hormone, it becomes hyperphosphorylated upon binding receptor agonists. It has been suggested that hormone-dependent phosphorylation of GR may determine target promoter specificity, cofactor interaction, strength and duration of receptor signaling, receptor stability, and receptor subcellular localization (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DHX29 is an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that belongs to the DEAD-box helicase family (DEAH subfamily). DHX29 contains one central helicase and one helicase at the carboxy-terminal domain (1). Its function has not been fully established but DHX29 was recently shown to facilitate translation initiation on mRNAs with structured 5' untranslated regions (2). DHX29 binds 40S subunits and hydrolyzes ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP. Hydrolysis of nucleotide triphosphates by DHX29 is strongly stimulated by 43S complexes and is required for DHX29 activity in promoting 48S complex formation (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MTAP is an enzyme that is essential for the salvage pathway for both adenine and methionine synthesis. MTAP catalyzes the cleavage of 5’-methylthioadenosine into adenine and 5-methylthio-D-ribose-1-phosphate. Adenine is then used to generate AMP whereas 5-methylthio-D-ribose-1-phosphate is converted into methionine (1,2). MTAP is expressed in all normal cells and tissues, although frequently lost in different human tumors including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors, non-small cell lung carcinoma and breast carcinoma. MTAP is usually codeleted with p16 (cdkN2a/ARF) (3-5). MTAP overexpression in breast cancer cells inhibits their ability to form colonies in soft agar, thereby implicating its function as a tumor suppressor (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PZR (Protein zero related) is an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that specifically binds the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 through its intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) (1,2). PZR is phosphorylated by c-Src, c-Fyn, c-Lyn, Csk, and c-Abl (3). PP1, a Src family kinase inhibitor, inhibits PZR phosphorylation (4,5). There are three alternatively spliced isoforms, designated as PZR, PZRa, and PZRb; both PZRa and PZRb lack ITIMs (6,7). PZR is the main receptor of ConA and has an important role in cell signaling via c-Src (4). PZR is expressed in many cell types and is localized to cell contacts and intracellular granules in BAECs and mesothelioma (REN) cells. PZR has been implicated as a cell adhesion protein that may be involved in SHP-2-dependent signaling at interendothelial cell contacts (3). Hypertyrosine phosphorylation of PZR was observed during embryogenesis in a mouse model of Noonan syndrome (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: EPAC1 and EPAC2 (exchange proteins activated by cyclic AMP) are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP, activating Rap1 and Rap2 small GTPases. Rap activation by EPAC is cAMP-dependent and mediates cAMP signaling in part through protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 1). EPAC signaling plays a significant role in a number of cellular processes including migration and focal adhesion formation (2), exocytosis (3), insulin signaling (4), axon growth and guidance (5) and neurotransmitter release (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: EPAC1 and EPAC2 (exchange proteins activated by cyclic AMP) are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP, activating Rap1 and Rap2 small GTPases. Rap activation by EPAC is cAMP-dependent and mediates cAMP signaling in part through protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 1). EPAC signaling plays a significant role in a number of cellular processes including migration and focal adhesion formation (2), exocytosis (3), insulin signaling (4), axon growth and guidance (5) and neurotransmitter release (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: EGR family members are transcriptional factors that contain three repetitive zinc finger DNA binding domains which bind to EGR response elements (ER) to regulate target gene expression (1). The expression of EGR family members is induced by growth factors, with EGR1 expression being induced by NGF (1,2). Increased EGR1 expression activates transcription of other signaling molecules, including CDK5 and tyrosine hydroxylase, and exerts long term effects on neural cell growth and differentiation (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: EGR family members are transcriptional factors that contain three repetitive zinc finger DNA binding domains which bind to EGR response elements (ER) to regulate target gene expression (1). The expression of EGR family members is induced by growth factors, with EGR1 expression being induced by NGF (1,2). Increased EGR1 expression activates transcription of other signaling molecules, including CDK5 and tyrosine hydroxylase, and exerts long term effects on neural cell growth and differentiation (2,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ADAM (A Disintegrin and A Metalloprotease) family of multidomain membrane proteins influences cell signaling and adhesion by shedding cell surface proteins such as cytokines and growth factors, by influencing cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM), and by directly remodeling the ECM. Conserved domains in ADAM family members include a prodomain, a zinc-dependent metalloprotease domain, a disintegrin domain, a cysteine-rich domain, an EGF-like sequence, and a short cytoplasmic tail (1,2).The prodomain is thought to aid in protein folding. Disintegrin and cysteine-rich domains mediate adhesion, at least in part, through binding to integrins. Phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic tail as well as its interaction with other signaling proteins may influence intra- and extracellular signaling (1). ADAM9 is widely distributed and has been shown to affect migration in skin keratinocytes (3,4). Research studies have shown that ADAM9 is overexpressed in prostate cancer (5), pancreatic cancer (6), gastric cancer (7), and has been linked to invasion and metastasis in small cell lung cancer (8). Research has also shown that an alternatively spliced short (50 kDa) form of ADAM9 containing protease activity is involved in tumor cell invasion (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).