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Product listing: FoxO3a (75D8) Rabbit mAb (Biotinylated), UniProt ID O43524 #3938 to Phospho-Bcr (Tyr177) Antibody, UniProt ID P11274 #3901

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The unconjugated FoxO3a (75D8) Rabbit mAb #2497 reacts with human, mouse and rat Fox03a protein. CST expects that FoxO3a (75D8) Rabbit mAb (Biotinylated) will also recognize Fox03a in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Forkhead family of transcription factors is involved in tumorigenesis of rhabdomyosarcoma and acute leukemias (1-3). Within the family, three members (FoxO1, FoxO4, and FoxO3a) have sequence similarity to the nematode orthologue DAF-16, which mediates signaling via a pathway involving IGFR1, PI3K, and Akt (4-6). Active forkhead members act as tumor suppressors by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Increased expression of any FoxO member results in the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p27 Kip1. Forkhead transcription factors also play a part in TGF-β-mediated upregulation of p21 Cip1, a process negatively regulated through PI3K (7). Increased proliferation results when forkhead transcription factors are inactivated through phosphorylation by Akt at Thr24, Ser256, and Ser319, which results in nuclear export and inhibition of transcription factor activity (8). Forkhead transcription factors can also be inhibited by the deacetylase sirtuin (SirT1) (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin is a conserved polypeptide unit that plays an important role in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the activation component E1; the activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2, then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the epsilon-NH2 of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has been implicated in a wide range of normal biological processes and in disease-related abnormalities. Several proteins such as IκB, p53, cdc25A, and Bcl-2 have been shown to be targets for the ubiquitin-proteasome process as part of regulation of cell cycle progression, differentiation, cell stress response, and apoptosis (4-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PHD finger protein 20 (PHF20) is a putative transcription factor protein. PHF20 contains a tudor domain, which facilitates binding to di-methylated histone H4 Lys20 (1). PHF20 may contribute to the development of cancers, including glioblastoma, lung cancer, colon cancer and ovarian cancer (2-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin is a conserved polypeptide unit that plays an important role in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the activation component E1; the activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2, then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the epsilon-NH2 of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has been implicated in a wide range of normal biological processes and in disease-related abnormalities. Several proteins such as IκB, p53, cdc25A, and Bcl-2 have been shown to be targets for the ubiquitin-proteasome process as part of regulation of cell cycle progression, differentiation, cell stress response, and apoptosis (4-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Rab family of proteins includes small, monomeric GTPases essential for regulating intracellular vesicle trafficking. Members of the Rab3 subfamily, including Rab3A-3D, are involved in the exocytosis of neurotransmitters and hormones (1). Rab3A is primarily expressed in neurons (2), neuroendocrine cells (such as rat PC-12 cells), and in human pancreatic β cells (3,4). By acting as a molecular switch between active GTP-bound Rab3A and the inactive GDP-bound form, Rab3A inhibits synaptic vesicle and chromaffin granule secretion during late membrane release (5,6). Loss-of-function studies suggest Rab3A is involved in controlling synaptic vesicle targeting and docking at the active zone (7). Through binding to its direct effector Rabphillin, Rab3A also orchestrates the coupling between synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis (8).

$327
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-4E-BP1 (Thr37/46) (236B4) Rabbit mAb #2855.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Translation repressor protein 4E-BP1 (also known as PHAS-1) inhibits cap-dependent translation by binding to the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 disrupts this interaction and results in activation of cap-dependent translation (1). Both the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway and FRAP/mTOR kinase regulate 4E-BP1 activity (2,3). Multiple 4E-BP1 residues are phosphorylated in vivo (4). While phosphorylation by FRAP/mTOR at Thr37 and Thr46 does not prevent the binding of 4E-BP1 to eIF4E, it is thought to prime 4E-BP1 for subsequent phosphorylation at Ser65 and Thr70 (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 25 kDa synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP25) is a target membrane soluble, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (t-SNARE) that is found on neuronal presynaptic membranes. SNAP25 forms a core complex with the SNARE proteins syntaxin and synaptobrevin to mediate synaptic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane during Ca2+-dependent exocytosis (1). This complex is responsible for exocytosis of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Neurotransmitter release is inhibited by proteolysis of SNAP25 by botulinum toxins A and E (2). SNAP25 plays a secondary role as a Q-SNARE involved in endosome fusion; the protein is associated with genetic susceptibility to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (3).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Several protein-protein interactions are essential to membrane fusion during endocytosis. Membrane fusion requires interaction among SNARE1 proteins associated with both donor and acceptor membranes (1,2). Following membrane fusion, the α-SNAP cytoplasmic adapter protein binds to the SNARE complex. N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), a hexameric ATPase, then associates with the α-SNAP/SNARE complex to mediate SNARE disassembly during membrane fusion (3,4). The ATPase activity of NSF induces a conformational change in the α-SNAP/SNARE complex that leads to its dissociation from the membrane, membrane fusion and eventual recycling of the SNARE complex for subsequent membrane fusion (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) play an integral role in modifying insulin-like growth factor (IGF) actions in a wide variety of cell types. This family contains six members that are structurally related but encoded by distinct genes. IGFBPs have a high affinity for IGFs. Some members of the IGFBP family have been consistently shown to inhibit IGF actions by preventing them from gaining access to the IGF receptors, while others potentiate IGF actions by facilitating the ligand-receptor interaction (1-3). IGFBP2 is the second most abundant IGFBP in the circulation and is present in various other biological fluids and tissues of many vertebrate species. Serum IGFBP2 levels are elevated in conditions such as shock, fasting, hypoxemia or after traumata, suggesting complex regulation of IGFBP2 expression (4). IGFBP2 is overexpressed in many malignancies and is often correlated with an increasingly malignant status of the tumor, pointing to a potential involvement of IGFBP2 in tumorigenesis (5).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: AMPA- (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid), kainate-, and NMDA- (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors are the three main families of ionotropic glutamate-gated ion channels. AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are comprised of four subunits (GluR 1-4), which assemble as homo- or hetero-tetramers to mediate the majority of fast excitatory transmissions in the central nervous system. AMPARs are implicated in synapse formation, stabilization, and plasticity (1). In contrast to GluR 2-containing AMPARs, AMPARs that lack GluR 2 are permeable to calcium (2). Post-transcriptional modifications (alternative splicing, nuclear RNA editing) and post-translational modifications (glycosylation, phosphorylation) result in a very large number of permutations, fine-tuning the kinetic properties of AMPARs. Research studies have implicated activity changes in AMPARs in a variety of diseases including Alzheimer’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), stroke, and epilepsy (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bag1 belongs to the Bcl-2 associated athanogene (BAG) family of multifunctional proteins and was the first of six related proteins isolated from humans (1,2). This widely expressed protein interacts with a number of signaling molecules (including Bcl2, HGF receptor and Raf1) as it regulates signaling molecules in pathways involving cell survival, growth and differentiation. The most common role played by Bag1 protein is as an inhibitor of proteins favoring apoptosis (2-4). Bag1 also plays a role in Raf1 signaling and binds DNA as a transcription activator (4). Bag1 protein is a well-characterized inhibitor of its binding partner HSP70 (5). A conserved carboxy-terminal BAG domain within Bag1 interacts with the ATPase domain of HSP70 to negatively regulate heat shock protein chaperone activity (6,7). The multiple isoforms of Bag1 protein generated from a single transcript share a common ubiquitin homology domain and a carboxy-terminal Hsp70 binding region but differ in length and cellular localization. The 50 kDa long (Bag1-L) isoform also contains a nuclear localization signal and is often found in the nucleus where it activates transcription. The 46 kDa intermediate (Bag1-M) isoform is found mainly in the cytoplasm but can also translocate to the nucleus when associated with other proteins. The shorter 29-33 kDa isoforms (Bag1-S, Bag-1) isoforms are found primarily in the cytoplasm (8). High expression of the anti-apoptotic Bag1 protein correlates with increased survival in patients with particular forms of cancer, leading researchers to study possible therapeutic roles for Bag1 protein (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Postsynaptic Density protein 95 (PSD95) is a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins. These family members consist of an amino-terminal variable segment followed by three PDZ domains, a SH3 domain, and an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain. PSD95 is a scaffolding protein involved in the assembly and function of the postsynaptic density complex (1-2). PSD95 participates in synaptic targeting of AMPA receptors through an indirect manner involving Stargazin and related transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) (3). It is implicated in experience-dependent plasticity and plays an indispensable role in learning (4). Mutations in PSD95 are associated with autism (5).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that is widely expressed in many cell lines and cell types within fetal and postnatal tissues (1-3). Receptor autophosphorylation follows binding of the IGF-I and IGF-II ligands. Three tyrosine residues within the kinase domain (Tyr1131, Tyr1135, and Tyr1136) are the earliest major autophosphorylation sites (4). Phosphorylation of these three tyrosine residues is necessary for kinase activation (5,6). Insulin receptors (IRs) share significant structural and functional similarity with IGF-I receptors, including the presence of an equivalent tyrosine cluster (Tyr1146/1150/1151) within the kinase domain activation loop. Tyrosine autophosphorylation of IRs is one of the earliest cellular responses to insulin stimulation (7). Autophosphorylation begins with phosphorylation at Tyr1146 and either Tyr1150 or Tyr1151, while full kinase activation requires triple tyrosine phosphorylation (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The discoidin domain receptors (DDRs) are receptor tyrosine kinases with a discoidin homology repeat in their extracellular domains, activated by binding to extracellular matrix collagens. So far, two mammalian DDRs have been identified: DDR1 and DDR2 (1). They are widely expressed in human tissues and may have roles in smooth muscle cell-mediated collagen remodeling (2). Research studies have implicated aberrant expression and signaling of DDRs in human diseases related to increased matrix degradation and remodeling, such as cardiovascular disease, liver fibrosis, and tumor invasion (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Docking proteins are substrates of tyrosine kinases that function in the recruitment and assembly of specific signal transduction molecules. There are five members in the p62dok family, p62Dok (Dok-1), p56Dok-2 (Dok-2, or DoK-R), Dok-3, Dok-4 and Dok-5 (1-3), characterized by the presence of an amino-terminal PH domain, a central PTB domain and numerous potential sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p56Dok-2 occurs upon stimulation of cells with a variety of stimuli, or in cells transformed by oncogenic tyrosine kinases such as v-Src and Bcr-Abl (3-5). Based on the presence of several signaling domains (PH, PTB domain, tyrosine residue and proline-rich regions), it has been proposed that the p62dok family act as docking proteins that link RTKs to signal transduction pathways. p56Dok-2 has been proposed to be a negative regulator of cytokine-induced proliferation in T cells (5). Phosphorylated Tyr351 of p56Dok-2 mediates an association with the SH2 domain of Nck (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tropomyosin-1 (TPM1) belongs to the high molecular weight members of tropomyosin family (1,2). The protein exists in an alpha-helical coiled-coil conformation and binds multiple acting monomers in a tight manner to stabilize and regulate the actin filament (3). Tropomyosins fullfill functions in muscle and non-muscle cells. In muscle cells, tropomyosins associate with the troponin complex and play a central role in the calcium-dependent regulation of striated muscle contraction in vertebrates. In non-muscle cells, tropomyosins are implicated in the formation and stabilization of cytoskeletal actin filaments to ensure normal cellular processes (1,2). Mutations of tropomysin-1 have been reported as a cause of dilated cardiac myopathies (4). Tropomyosin-1 also functions as a tumor suppressor, and many malignant tumors demonstrate downregulation of tropomyosin-1 expression (5-8). Tropomyosin-1 is phosphorylated at Ser283 through the Erk/DAPK pathway, which promotes stress fiber formation in response to oxidative stress (9-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: p62Dok (Dok-1) is a major tyrosine-phosphorylated, GAP-associated, 60 kDa protein present within the cells transformed by different tyrosine kinases (1). p62Dok contains an amino-terminal pleckstrin homology domain potentially involved in phospholipid interaction and membrane targeting, a central putative phospho-tyrosine binding domain for interacting with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. There are numerous tyrosines in its carboxy-terminal region that are potential targets for tyrosine kinases. If phosphorylated, these tyrosines could serve as docking sites for proteins that contain an SH2 domain (2). Overexpression of p62Dok has been shown to inhibit Ras activity in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and B cell antigen receptor-mediated c-Fos promoter activation in an immature B cell line (3), suggesting that p62Dok may play a negative role in Ras signaling. Moreover, p62Dok overexpression may also inhibit insulin-stimulated Akt activation (4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Docking proteins are substrates of tyrosine kinases that function in the recruitment and assembly of specific signal transduction molecules. There are five members in the p62dok family, p62Dok (Dok-1), p56Dok-2 (Dok-2, or DoK-R), Dok-3, Dok-4 and Dok-5 (1-3), characterized by the presence of an amino-terminal PH domain, a central PTB domain and numerous potential sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p56Dok-2 occurs upon stimulation of cells with a variety of stimuli, or in cells transformed by oncogenic tyrosine kinases such as v-Src and Bcr-Abl (3-5). Based on the presence of several signaling domains (PH, PTB domain, tyrosine residue and proline-rich regions), it has been proposed that the p62dok family act as docking proteins that link RTKs to signal transduction pathways. p56Dok-2 has been proposed to be a negative regulator of cytokine-induced proliferation in T cells (5). Phosphorylated Tyr351 of p56Dok-2 mediates an association with the SH2 domain of Nck (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tropomyosin-1 (TPM1) belongs to the high molecular weight members of tropomyosin family (1,2). The protein exists in an alpha-helical coiled-coil conformation and binds multiple acting monomers in a tight manner to stabilize and regulate the actin filament (3). Tropomyosins fullfill functions in muscle and non-muscle cells. In muscle cells, tropomyosins associate with the troponin complex and play a central role in the calcium-dependent regulation of striated muscle contraction in vertebrates. In non-muscle cells, tropomyosins are implicated in the formation and stabilization of cytoskeletal actin filaments to ensure normal cellular processes (1,2). Mutations of tropomysin-1 have been reported as a cause of dilated cardiac myopathies (4). Tropomyosin-1 also functions as a tumor suppressor, and many malignant tumors demonstrate downregulation of tropomyosin-1 expression (5-8). Tropomyosin-1 is phosphorylated at Ser283 through the Erk/DAPK pathway, which promotes stress fiber formation in response to oxidative stress (9-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) is expressed in cells of the inner cell mass and the epiblast (1). Expression is down-regulated with development, although it is maintained in the embryonic germ cells and in the adult gonads (1). Reduced expression in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is associated with failure to differentiate properly, although self-renewal is unaffected (2). UTF1 is tightly associated with chromatin in mouse and human ESCs and may be involved in maintaining an epigenetic environment necessary for the pluripotent state (2,3). Co-expression of UTF1 with reprogramming factors c-Myc, Oct-4, Sox2 and KLF4, along with siRNA knock-down of p53 increased efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cell generation by 100 fold (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Bcr gene was orginally identified by its presence in the chimeric Bcr-Abl oncogene (1). The amino-terminal region of Bcr contains an oligomerization domain, a serine/threonine kinase domain, and a region that binds SH2 domains. The middle of the protein has a PH domain and a region of sequence similarity to the guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Rho family of GTP binding proteins. The carboxy-terminal region may be involved in a GTPase activating function for the small GTP-binding protein Rac (2,3). The function of wild type Bcr in cells remains unclear. PDGF receptor may use Bcr as a downstream signaling mediator (4). Research studies have shown that the Bcr-Abl fusion results in production of a constitutively active tyrosine kinase, which causes chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) (5). Tyr177 of Bcr is phosphorylated in the Bcr-Abl fusion protein, which plays an important role in transforming the activity of Bcr-Abl (6). Phosphorylated Tyr177 provides a docking site for Gab2 and GRB2 (7,8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated antibody (GAPDH (14C10) Rabbit mAb #2118).
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate during glycolysis. Though differentially expressed from tissue to tissue (1), GAPDH is thought to be a constitutively expressed housekeeping protein. For this reason, GAPDH mRNA and protein levels are often measured as controls in experiments quantifying specific changes in expression of other targets. Recent work has elucidated roles for GAPDH in apoptosis (2), gene expression (3), and nuclear transport (4). GAPDH may also play a role in neurodegenerative pathologies such as Huntington and Alzheimer's diseases (4,5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated GAPDH (14C10) Rabbit mAb #2118.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate during glycolysis. Though differentially expressed from tissue to tissue (1), GAPDH is thought to be a constitutively expressed housekeeping protein. For this reason, GAPDH mRNA and protein levels are often measured as controls in experiments quantifying specific changes in expression of other targets. Recent work has elucidated roles for GAPDH in apoptosis (2), gene expression (3), and nuclear transport (4). GAPDH may also play a role in neurodegenerative pathologies such as Huntington and Alzheimer's diseases (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) consist of α, β and γ subunits and mediate the effects of hormones, neurotransmitters, chemokines, and sensory stimuli. To date, over 20 known Gα subunits have been classified into four families, Gα(s), Gα(i/o), Gα(q) and Gα(12), based on structural and functional similarities (1,2). Phosphorylation of Tyr356 of Gα(q)/Gα(11) is essential for activation of the G protein, since phenylalanine substitution for Tyr356 changes the interaction of Gα with receptors and abolishes ligand-induced IP3 formation (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Bcr gene was orginally identified by its presence in the chimeric Bcr-Abl oncogene (1). The amino-terminal region of Bcr contains an oligomerization domain, a serine/threonine kinase domain, and a region that binds SH2 domains. The middle of the protein has a PH domain and a region of sequence similarity to the guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Rho family of GTP binding proteins. The carboxy-terminal region may be involved in a GTPase activating function for the small GTP-binding protein Rac (2,3). The function of wild type Bcr in cells remains unclear. PDGF receptor may use Bcr as a downstream signaling mediator (4). Research studies have shown that the Bcr-Abl fusion results in production of a constitutively active tyrosine kinase, which causes chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) (5). Tyr177 of Bcr is phosphorylated in the Bcr-Abl fusion protein, which plays an important role in transforming the activity of Bcr-Abl (6). Phosphorylated Tyr177 provides a docking site for Gab2 and GRB2 (7,8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: The Bcr gene was orginally identified by its presence in the chimeric Bcr-Abl oncogene (1). The amino-terminal region of Bcr contains an oligomerization domain, a serine/threonine kinase domain, and a region that binds SH2 domains. The middle of the protein has a PH domain and a region of sequence similarity to the guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Rho family of GTP binding proteins. The carboxy-terminal region may be involved in a GTPase activating function for the small GTP-binding protein Rac (2,3). The function of wild type Bcr in cells remains unclear. PDGF receptor may use Bcr as a downstream signaling mediator (4). Research studies have shown that the Bcr-Abl fusion results in production of a constitutively active tyrosine kinase, which causes chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) (5). Tyr177 of Bcr is phosphorylated in the Bcr-Abl fusion protein, which plays an important role in transforming the activity of Bcr-Abl (6). Phosphorylated Tyr177 provides a docking site for Gab2 and GRB2 (7,8).