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Product listing: MCM7 (D10A11) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P33993 #3735 to LIN28A (D84C11) XP® Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q9H9Z2 #3695

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: GP130 is a signal-transducing subunit shared by the receptors for the IL-6 family of cytokines (1-3). The binding of a ligand to its receptor induces the dimerization of GP130, leading to activation of the Jak tyrosine kinase and to tyrosine phosphorylation of GP130. These events lead to the activation of multiple signal-transduction pathways, such as the Stat, Ras-MAPK and PI3 kinase pathways, whose activation is controlled by distinct regions of GP130 (4-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2) is a type I transmembrane protein and member of the neurexin superfamily that mediates nervous system cell-cell interactions through the Neurexin IV-Caspr-Paranodin (NCP) complex (1). A multiprotein complex consisting of TAG-1, Caspr2, K+ channel, PSD95 and protein 4.1B mediates the molecular interactions at the juxtaparanodal region of myelinated axons, with homophilic TAG-1 interactions mediating the binding of this complex to glia (2,3).Caspr2 protein localizes to juxtaparanodal regions of myelinated axons where it forms a cis-complex with the immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule TAG-1. Caspr2 also binds to Shaker K+ channels Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and their Kvβ2 subunit. A PDZ domain at the Caspr2 carboxy terminus mediates the Caspr2-K+ channel association. Caspr2 is required for proper K+ channel localization, as Caspr2 deletion causes the redistribution of channels along the internodes (1-3). Furthermore, Caspr2 binds to protein 4.1B and connects the protein complex to the axonal cytoskeleton (4). Mutations in the Caspr2 gene have been linked to focal epilepsy, cortical dysplasia and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: SPAK (STE20/SPS1-related Pro/Ala-rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress responsive 1) are members of the GCK family serine/threonine kinases. Overexpression and in vitro studies demonstrate that SPAK is able to activate p38 MAP kinase indicating a possible role for SPAK in the stress response (1). Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that SPAK and OSR1 bind to Na-K-2Cl cotransporters NKCC1 and NKCC2 and K-Cl cotransporter KCC3 (2). WNK1 and WNK4 phosphorylate SPAK at Thr243/247 and Ser380 (3-5). Similarly, WNK1 and WNK4 phosphorylate OSR1 at Thr185 and Ser315 (3,4). Phosphorylation at these sites stimulates SPAK and OSR1 activity, leading to NKCC1 phosphorylation and enhanced NKCC1 activity (3-5). SPAK is also phosphorylated at Ser311 by PKCθ in response to T cell activation. Substitution of Ser311 with Ala or specific siRNA knock-down of SPAK dramatically reduces TCR/CD28-induced AP-1 activation, suggesting SPAK is involved in T cell signaling as well (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Embryonic stem cells (ESC) derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst are unique in their pluripotent capacity and potential for self-renewal (1). Research studies demonstrate that a set of transcription factors that includes Oct-4, Sox2, and Nanog forms a transcriptional network that maintains cells in a pluripotent state (2,3). Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Sox2 and Oct-4 bind to thousands of gene regulatory sites, many of which regulate cell pluripotency and early embryonic development (4,5). siRNA knockdown of either Sox2 or Oct-4 results in loss of pluripotency (6). Induced overexpression of Oct-4 and Sox2, along with additional transcription factors Klf4 and c-Myc, can reprogram both mouse and human somatic cells to a pluripotent state (7,8). Additional evidence demonstrates that Sox2 is also present in adult multipotent progenitors that give rise to some adult epithelial tissues, including several glands, the glandular stomach, testes, and cervix. Sox2 is thought to regulate target gene expression important for survival and regeneration of these tissues (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α is an important cytokine produced by numerous cell types including neutrophils, activated lymphoctyes, macrophages and NK cells. It plays a critical role in inflammatory responses and in apoptosis (1). TNF-α exists as a membrane-anchored and soluble form, both of which show biological activity. Response to TNF-α is mediated through two receptors, TNF-R1, which is widely expressed, and TNF-R2, which is expressed mainly in immune and endothelial cells (2). Antagonists to TNF-α have been validated as therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis and other immune disorders (3).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Class 3 secreted semaphorin (Sema3A) is a chemorepellent that acts upon a wide variety of axons. As such, it induces a dramatic redistribution and depolymerization of actin filaments that results in growth cone collapse. Plexins are single pass, transmembrane signaling proteins encompassing Plexin A1, A2, A3 and A4. Plexins form a complex with neuropilin-1 and -2 and the cell adhesion protein L1 to form a functional semaphorin receptor (1,2). The GTPase Rnd1 binds to the cytoplasmic domain of Plexin A1 to trigger cytoskeletal collapse. In contrast, the GTPase RhoD blocks Rnd1-mediated Plexin A1 activation and repulsion of sympathetic axons by Sema3A (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian sterile-20-like (MST) kinases are upstream regulators of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways that regulate multiple biological processes, including apoptosis, morphogenesis, cell migration, and cytoskeletal rearrangements (1). This group of serine/threonine kinases includes a pair of closely related proteins (MST1, MST2) that are functionally distinct from the more distantly related MST3 and MST4 kinases. All four MST kinases share a conserved amino-terminal kinase domain and carboxy-terminal regulatory and interaction domains (1-3). At least three of these kinases (MST1-3) promote apoptosis and are activated by caspase cleavage followed by nuclear translocation of the active kinase. MST1/2 kinases play a key role in the Hippo signaling pathway, an evolutionarily conserved program that controls organ size by regulating cell proliferation, apoptosis, and stem cell self renewal (4).Mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 3 (MST3, STK24) is ubiquitously expressed as a longer MST3b isoform and a shorter MST3a protein lacking a portion of the amino-terminal region (5). The widely expressed MST3a protein regulates apoptosis and cell motility, as well as neuronal migration during CNS development (6,7). MST3 phosphorylates and activates the NDR protein kinases that regulate cell cycle progression and cell morphology (8). Autophosphorylation of MST3 at Thr178 is required for in vitro kinase activity, and alteration of this residue inhibits MST3 regulation of cell migration in vivo (7). The brain-specific MST3b protein is activated by nerve growth factor or inosine and localizes to neurons where it helps regulate axon growth and regeneration (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Pin1, a member of the parvulin family of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (PPIase), has been implicated in the G2/M transition of the mammalian cell cycle (1-6). Pin1 is a small (18 kDa) protein with two distinct functional domains: an amino-terminal WW domain and a carboxy-terminal PPlase domain. Pin1 interacts with several mitotic phosphoproteins, including Plk1, cdc25C and cdc27, and is thought to act as a phosphorylation-dependent PPlase for these target molecules (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, G proteins, transduce ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) into intracellular responses (1). G proteins are comprised of 3 subunits, alpha (Gα), beta (Gβ), and gamma (Gγ). Upon activation of GPCRs, the receptor promotes the exchange of GDP to GTP of Gα, changing the confirmation of the switch regions within Gα. The receptor bound heterotimeric G protein (inactive) is then released, and dissociates into the GTP-bound Gα (active) monomer and the Gβ/Gγ heterodimer (1,2). Gα activates adenylyl cyclase, which converts ATP to the second messenger cAMP. Gα also activates phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC), which catalyzes hydrolysis of the phospholipid of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2), releasing the second messengers IP3 and 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG). IP3 activates IP3 receptors to release Ca2+ from the ER. DAG is an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), which in turn activates the Erk1/2 pathway (1,3). The primary function of the Gβ/Gγ heterodimer is to inhibit Gα, although it may also activate second messengers (e.g. PLC pathway) or gate ion channels (e.g. GIRK) (1). Guanine nucleotide-binding protein b3 (GNB3) is an isoform of the b subunit. Research studies have shown that a polymorphism in the GNB3 gene, C825T, is associated with hypertension, obesity, and depression (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) is a heterodimeric transcription factor that plays a critical role in the cellular response to hypoxia (1). The HIF1 complex consists of two subunits, HIF-1α and HIF-1β, which are basic helix-loop-helix proteins of the PAS (Per, ARNT, Sim) family (2). HIF1 regulates the transcription of a broad range of genes that facilitate responses to the hypoxic environment, including genes regulating angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, cell cycle, metabolism, and apoptosis. The widely expressed HIF-1α is typically degraded rapidly in normoxic cells by the ubiquitin/proteasomal pathway. Under normoxic conditions, HIF-1α is proline hydroxylated leading to a conformational change that promotes binding to the von Hippel Lindau protein (VHL) E3 ligase complex; ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation follows (3,4). Both hypoxic conditions and chemical hydroxylase inhibitors (such as desferrioxamine and cobalt) inhibit HIF-1α degradation and lead to its stabilization. In addition, HIF-1α can be induced in an oxygen-independent manner by various cytokines through the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway (5-7).HIF-1β is also known as AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) due to its ability to partner with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) to form a heterodimeric transcription factor complex (8). Together with AhR, HIF-1β plays an important role in xenobiotics metabolism (8). In addition, a chromosomal translocation leading to a TEL-ARNT fusion protein is associated with acute myeloblastic leukemia (9). Studies also found that ARNT/HIF-1β expression levels decrease significantly in pancreatic islets from patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting that HIF-1β plays an important role in pancreatic β-cell function (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) is a member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family, sharing the same receptor, EGFR, and regulating cell proliferation, survival, and differention (1). Members of the family share an EGF-like domain of 45-60 amino acids characterized by the conservation of six regularly spaced cysteins, forming three disulfide bonds that function as their receptor binding domain. TGF-alpha was initially discovered in the media of retrovirally transformed fibroblasts, and it name comes from its ability to induce transformation in cultured fibroblasts (2). This transforming activity was later shown to require TGF-beta, which potentiates the activity of TGF-alpha through a separate receptor (3). Soluble TGF-alpha is released from its membrane-bound precusor, pro-TGF-alpha, following protolytic cleavage, but the membrane bound precursor is still able to bind and activate EGFR (4). Binding of soluble or membrane bound TGF-alpha to EGFR leads to receptor dimerization, tyrosine autophosphorylation, and activation of downstream signaling components. TGF-alpha and related peptides play an important role in the progression of cancer as well as in neuropathological processes (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor for pleiotrophin (PTN), a growth factor involved in embryonic brain development (1-3). In ALK-expressing cells, PTN induces phosphorylation of both ALK and the downstream effectors IRS-1, Shc, PLCγ, and PI3 kinase (1). ALK was originally discovered as a nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK fusion protein produced by a translocation (4). Investigators have found that the NPM-ALK fusion protein is a constitutively active, oncogenic tyrosine kinase associated with anaplastic lymphoma (4). Research literature suggests that activation of PLCγ by NPM-ALK may be a crucial step for its mitogenic activity and involved in the pathogenesis of anaplastic lymphomas (5).A distinct ALK oncogenic fusion protein involving ALK and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein like 4 (EML4) has been described in the research literature from a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, with corresponding fusion transcripts present in some cases of lung adenocarcinoma. The short, amino-terminal region of the microtubule-associated protein EML4 is fused to the kinase domain of ALK (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mink, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor for pleiotrophin (PTN), a growth factor involved in embryonic brain development (1-3). In ALK-expressing cells, PTN induces phosphorylation of both ALK and the downstream effectors IRS-1, Shc, PLCγ, and PI3 kinase (1). ALK was originally discovered as a nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK fusion protein produced by a translocation (4). Investigators have found that the NPM-ALK fusion protein is a constitutively active, oncogenic tyrosine kinase associated with anaplastic lymphoma (4). Research literature suggests that activation of PLCγ by NPM-ALK may be a crucial step for its mitogenic activity and involved in the pathogenesis of anaplastic lymphomas (5).A distinct ALK oncogenic fusion protein involving ALK and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein like 4 (EML4) has been described in the research literature from a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, with corresponding fusion transcripts present in some cases of lung adenocarcinoma. The short, amino-terminal region of the microtubule-associated protein EML4 is fused to the kinase domain of ALK (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The stress-activated protein kinase/Jun-amino-terminal kinase SAPK/JNK is potently and preferentially activated by a variety of environmental stresses including UV and gamma radiation, ceramides, inflammatory cytokines, and in some instances, growth factors and GPCR agonists (1-6). As with the other MAPKs, the core signaling unit is composed of a MAPKKK, typically MEKK1-MEKK4, or by one of the mixed lineage kinases (MLKs), which phosphorylate and activate MKK4/7. Upon activation, MKKs phosphorylate and activate the SAPK/JNK kinase (2). Stress signals are delivered to this cascade by small GTPases of the Rho family (Rac, Rho, cdc42) (3). Both Rac1 and cdc42 mediate the stimulation of MEKKs and MLKs (3). Alternatively, MKK4/7 can be activated in a GTPase-independent mechanism via stimulation of a germinal center kinase (GCK) family member (4). There are three SAPK/JNK genes each of which undergoes alternative splicing, resulting in numerous isoforms (3). SAPK/JNK, when active as a dimer, can translocate to the nucleus and regulate transcription through its effects on c-Jun, ATF-2, and other transcription factors (3,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zona occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces (reviewed in 1). Zona occludens proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3 (also known as TJP1, 2, and 3) are peripheral membrane adaptor proteins that link junctional transmembrane proteins such as occludin and claudin to the actin cytoskeleton (reviewed in 2). ZO-1 and -2 are required for tight junction formation and function (3,4). In subconfluent proliferating cells, ZO-1 and ZO-2 have been shown to colocalize to the nucleus and play a role in transcriptional regulation, possibly through facilitating nuclear import/export of transcriptional regulators (5-7). The ZO-2 gene is transcribed from two promoters, generating the ZO-2A and ZO-2C isoforms. ZO-2C lacks a 23 amino acid amino-terminal sequence found in other ZO-2 isoforms. While both isoforms appear to be widely expressed, abnormal regulation of the ZO-2 gene may be correlated with development of ductal cancer (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SHP-2 (PTPN11) is a ubiquitously expressed, nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). It participates in signaling events downstream of receptors for growth factors, cytokines, hormones, antigens, and extracellular matrices in the control of cell growth, differentiation, migration, and death (1). Activation of SHP-2 and its association with Gab1 is critical for sustained Erk activation downstream of several growth factor receptors and cytokines (2). In addition to its role in Gab1-mediated Erk activation, SHP-2 attenuates EGF-dependent PI3 kinase activation by dephosphorylating Gab1 at p85 binding sites (3). SHP-2 becomes phosphorylated at Tyr542 and Tyr580 in its carboxy-terminus in response to growth factor receptor activation (4). These phosphorylation events are thought to relieve basal inhibition and stimulate SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase activity (5). Mutations in the corresponding gene result in a pair of clinically similar disorders (Noonan syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome) that may result from abnormal MAPK regulation (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The GRB7 family of adaptor proteins consist of GRB7, GRB10 and GRB14, which all contain an amino-terminal proline-rich SH3 binding domain, followed by PH, PBS, and SH2 domains. Each member of the family has several splice variants (1). It has been reported that GRB10 interacts with many receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) as well as downstream signal molecules including Raf, Akt, and Nedd4 (1,2). Although it was originally thought that GRB10 is exclusively phosphorylated at serine residues (3), Src kinase family members have been shown to phosphorylate GRB10 at Tyr67 (4).

$106
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: p27 Kip1 is a member of the Cip/Kip family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. Like its relatives, p57 Kip2 and p21 Waf1/Cip1, the ability to enforce the G1 restriction point is derived from its inhibitory binding to CDK2/cyclin E and other CDK/cyclin complexes. Expression levels of p27 are upregulated in quiescent cells and in cells treated with cAMP or other negative cell cycle regulators. Downregulation of p27 can be induced by treatment with interleukin-2 or other mitogens; this involves phosphorylation of p27 and its degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (1-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The protein folliculin (FLCN) is encoded by the BHD (Birt-Hogg-Dube) gene that is altered in BHD Syndrome, a disorder characterized by the presence of benign connective tissue tumors known as fibrofolliculomas, renal tumors and lung cysts (1). Clinical similarities between BHD and hamartoma-producing disorders caused by Tsc2, PTEN and LKB1 gene mutations indicate that FLCN might also be important in nutrient and energy sensing through the mTOR pathway (2). This model is supported by studies demonstrating a direct correlation between the down regulation of BHD and a reduction in mTOR associated phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein (3). Mutation of either the TSC1 or TSC2 gene results in elevated mTOR activity (4) while deletion of the Tsc2 and BHD homologs in yeast have opposing effects on both mTOR signaling and amino acid homeostasis (5). BHD knock-out mice develop cysts and renal cell tumors similar to those found in BHD patients along with low levels of phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein (3). Based on these finding, it appears that either abnormally high or abnormally low levels of mTOR signaling might contribute to renal cell carcinogenesis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The tumor necrosis factor receptor family, which includes TNF-RI, Fas, DR3, DR4, DR5, and DR6, plays an important role in the regulation of apoptosis in various physiological systems (1,2). The receptors are activated by a family of cytokines that include TNF, FasL, and TRAIL. They are characterized by a highly conserved extracellular region containing cysteine-rich repeats and a conserved intracellular region of about 80 amino acids termed the death domain (DD). The DD is important for transducing the death signal by recruiting other DD containing adaptor proteins (FADD, TRADD, RIP) to the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), resulting in activation of caspases.

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: LIN28A and LIN28B are conserved, developmentally regulated RNA binding proteins that inhibit the processing and maturation of the let-7 family of miRNAs (1,2). The let-7 miRNAs have been implicated in repression of oncogenes such as Ras, Myc, and HMGA2 (3). It has recently been shown that upregulation of LIN28A and LIN28B in primary human tumors and human cancer cell lines is correlated with downregulation of let-7 miRNAs (4). LIN28 genes are reported to be involved in primordial germ cell development and germ cell malignancy (5). In addition, allelic variation in LIN28B is associated with regulating the timing of puberty in humans (6). Overexpression of LIN28A, in conjunction with Oct-4, Sox2, and Nanog, can reprogram human fibroblasts to pluripotent, ES-like cells (7).