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Product listing: Glycogen Synthase Antibody, UniProt ID P13807 #3893 to PLCγ Antibody Sampler Kit, UniProt ID P16885 #3860

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen is a polysaccharide of glucose and serves as an energy storage in mammalian muscle and liver (1). Glycogen synthase catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen biosynthesis and has two major isoforms in mammals -- muscle isoform (GYS1) and liver isoform (GYS2) respectively (1). Glycogen synthase kinase-3α (GSK-3α) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylate glycogen synthase at multiple sites in its C-terminus (Ser641, Ser645, Ser649 and Ser653) inhibiting its activity (2, 3). Hypoxia alters glycogen metabolism including temporal changes of GYS1 expression and phosphorylation in cancer cells, suggesting the role of metabolic reprogramming of glycogen metabolism in cancer growth (1).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HS1 (HCLS1, LckBP1, p75) is a protein kinase substrate that is expressed only in tissues and cells of hematopoietic origin (1,2). HS1 contains four cortactin repeats and a single SH3 domain (2). This intracellular protein is phosphorylated following immune receptor activation, which promotes recruitment of HS1 to the immune synapse (3-5). Phosphorylation of HS1 is required to regulate actin dynamics and provide docking sites for many other signaling molecules, such as Vav1 and PLCγ1 (6). HS1 also plays an important role in platelet activation (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen is a polysaccharide of glucose and serves as an energy storage in mammalian muscle and liver (1). Glycogen synthase catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen biosynthesis and has two major isoforms in mammals -- muscle isoform (GYS1) and liver isoform (GYS2) respectively (1). Glycogen synthase kinase-3α (GSK-3α) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylate glycogen synthase at multiple sites in its C-terminus (Ser641, Ser645, Ser649 and Ser653) inhibiting its activity (2, 3). Hypoxia alters glycogen metabolism including temporal changes of GYS1 expression and phosphorylation in cancer cells, suggesting the role of metabolic reprogramming of glycogen metabolism in cancer growth (1).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HS1 (HCLS1, LckBP1, p75) is a protein kinase substrate that is expressed only in tissues and cells of hematopoietic origin (1,2). HS1 contains four cortactin repeats and a single SH3 domain (2). This intracellular protein is phosphorylated following immune receptor activation, which promotes recruitment of HS1 to the immune synapse (3-5). Phosphorylation of HS1 is required to regulate actin dynamics and provide docking sites for many other signaling molecules, such as Vav1 and PLCγ1 (6). HS1 also plays an important role in platelet activation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) is a coiled coil protein involved in the formation and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. NuMA plays a role in chromatin organization during interphase, which influences mammary epithelial differentiation (1,2). During apoptosis, carboxy-terminal cleavage of NuMA may amplify signaling in the cell death pathway (2). NuMA is phosphorylated at numerous sites, with phosphorylation at Ser395 occurring in an ATM/ATR-dependent manner in response to DNA damage (3,4).Phosphorylation at Thr2055 by CDK1 is required for spindle pole association of NuMA at the onset of mitosis. Dephosphorylation by PPP2CA leads to enhancement of NuMA at the cell cortex in anaphase and proper cell-cycle progression (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen is a polysaccharide of glucose and serves as an energy storage in mammalian muscle and liver (1). Glycogen synthase catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen biosynthesis and has two major isoforms in mammals -- muscle isoform (GYS1) and liver isoform (GYS2) respectively (1). Glycogen synthase kinase-3α (GSK-3α) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylate glycogen synthase at multiple sites in its C-terminus (Ser641, Ser645, Ser649 and Ser653) inhibiting its activity (2, 3). Hypoxia alters glycogen metabolism including temporal changes of GYS1 expression and phosphorylation in cancer cells, suggesting the role of metabolic reprogramming of glycogen metabolism in cancer growth (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA repair systems operate in all living cells to manage a variety of DNA lesions. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is implemented in cases where bulky helix-distorting lesions occur, such as those brought about by UV and certain chemicals (1). Excision Repair Cross Complementing 1 (ERCC1) forms a complex with ERCC4/XPF, which acts as the 5’ endonuclease required to excise the lesion (2). ERCC1-XPF is also required for repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) (3) and involved in repair of double strand breaks (4). Research studies have shown that expression of ERCC1 is related to survival rate and response to chemotherapeutic drugs in several human cancers including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Grb-associated binder (Gab) family is a family of adaptor proteins recruited by a wide variety of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such as EGFR, HGFR, insulin receptor, cytokine receptor and B cell antigen receptors. Upon stimulation of RTKs by their cognate ligand, Gab is recruited to the plasma membrane where it is phosphorylated and functions as a scaffold (1-4). Multiple tyrosine phosphorylation sites of Gab1 protein have been identified (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr472 regulates its binding to p85 PI3 kinase (6,7). Phosphorylation of Gab1 at Tyr307, Tyr373 and Tyr407 modulates its association to PLCγ (8). Phosphorylation of Tyr627 and Tyr659 is required for Gab1 binding to and activation of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (6,9).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Grb-associated binder (Gab) family is a family of adaptor proteins recruited by a wide variety of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such as EGFR, HGFR, insulin receptor, cytokine receptor and B cell antigen receptors. Upon stimulation of RTKs by their cognate ligand, Gab is recruited to the plasma membrane where it is phosphorylated and functions as a scaffold (1-4). Multiple tyrosine phosphorylation sites of Gab1 protein have been identified (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr472 regulates its binding to p85 PI3 kinase (6,7). Phosphorylation of Gab1 at Tyr307, Tyr373 and Tyr407 modulates its association to PLCγ (8). Phosphorylation of Tyr627 and Tyr659 is required for Gab1 binding to and activation of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (6,9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Grb-associated binder (Gab) family is a family of adaptor proteins recruited by a wide variety of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such as EGFR, HGFR, insulin receptor, cytokine receptor and B cell antigen receptors. Upon stimulation of RTKs by their cognate ligand, Gab is recruited to the plasma membrane where it is phosphorylated and functions as a scaffold (1-4). Multiple tyrosine phosphorylation sites of Gab1 protein have been identified (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr472 regulates its binding to p85 PI3 kinase (6,7). Phosphorylation of Gab1 at Tyr307, Tyr373 and Tyr407 modulates its association to PLCγ (8). Phosphorylation of Tyr627 and Tyr659 is required for Gab1 binding to and activation of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (6,9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Fos family of nuclear oncogenes includes c-Fos, FosB, Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1), and Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) (1). While most Fos proteins exist as a single isoform, the FosB protein exists as two isoforms: full-length FosB and a shorter form, FosB2 (Delta FosB), which lacks the carboxy-terminal 101 amino acids (1-3). The expression of Fos proteins is rapidly and transiently induced by a variety of extracellular stimuli including growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, polypeptide hormones, and stress. Fos proteins dimerize with Jun proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) to form Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), a transcription factor that binds to TRE/AP-1 elements and activates transcription. Fos and Jun proteins contain the leucine-zipper motif that mediates dimerization and an adjacent basic domain that binds to DNA. The various Fos/Jun heterodimers differ in their ability to transactivate AP-1 dependent genes. In addition to increased expression, phosphorylation of Fos proteins by Erk kinases in response to extracellular stimuli may further increase transcriptional activity (4-6). Phosphorylation of c-Fos at Ser32 and Thr232 by Erk5 increases protein stability and nuclear localization (5). Phosphorylation of FRA1 at Ser252 and Ser265 by Erk1/2 increases protein stability and leads to overexpression of FRA1 in cancer cells (6). Following growth factor stimulation, expression of FosB and c-Fos in quiescent fibroblasts is immediate, but very short-lived, with protein levels dissipating after several hours (7). FRA1 and FRA2 expression persists longer, and appreciable levels can be detected in asynchronously growing cells (8). Deregulated expression of c-Fos, FosB, or FRA2 can result in neoplastic cellular transformation; however, Delta FosB lacks the ability to transform cells (2,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Snail is a zinc-finger transcription factor that can repress E-cadherin transcription. Downregulation of E-cadherin is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition during embryonic development, a process also exploited by invasive cancer cells (1-3). Indeed, loss of E-cadherin expression is correlated with the invasive properties of some tumors and there is a considerable inverse correlation between Snail and E-cadherin mRNA levels in epithelial tumor cell lines (4,5). In addition, Snail blocks the cell cycle and confers resistance to cell death (6). Phosphorylation of Snail by GSK-3 and PAK1 regulates its stability, cellular localization and function (7-10).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant for formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The JARID (Jumonji/AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein) family contains four members: JARID1A (also RBP2 and RBBP2), JARID1B (also PLU-1), JARID1C (also SMCX) and JARID1D (also SMCY) (4). In addition to the JmJC domain, these proteins contain JmJN, BRIGHT, C5HC2 zinc-finger, and PHD domains, the latter of which binds to methylated histone H3 (Lys9) (4). All four JARID proteins demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys4; JARID1B also demethylates mono-methyl histone H3 Lys4 (5-7). JARID1A is a critical RB-interacting protein and is required for Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional repression during ES cell differentiation (8). A JARID1A-NUP98 gene fusion is associated with myeloid leukemia (9). JARID1B, which interacts with many proteins including c-Myc and HDAC4, may play a role in cell fate decisions by blocking terminal differentiation (10-12). JARID1B is over-expressed in many breast cancers and may act by repressing multiple tumor suppressor genes including BRCA1 and HOXA5 (13,14). JARID1C has been found in a complex with HDAC1, HDAC2, G9a and REST, which binds to and represses REST target genes in non-neuronal cells (7). JARID1C mutations are associated with X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy (15,16). JARID1D is largely uncharacterized.

The Aurora Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means to investigate the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. The kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blots with each antibody.

Background: Aurora kinases belong to a highly conserved family of mitotic serine/threonine kinases with three members identified among mammals: Aurora A, B, and C (1,2). Studies on the temporal expression pattern and subcellular localization of Aurora kinases in mitotic cells suggest an association with mitotic structure. Aurora kinase functional influences span from G2 phase to cytokinesis and may be involved in key cell cycle events such as centrosome duplication, chromosome bi-orientation and segregation, cleavage furrow positioning, and ingression (3). Aurora A is detected at the centrosomes, along mitotic spindle microtubules, and in the cytoplasm of mitotically proliferating cells. Aurora A protein levels are low during G1 and S phases and peak during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Phosphorylation of Aurora A at Thr288 in its catalytic domain increases kinase activity. Aurora A is involved in centrosome separation, maturation, and spindle assembly and stability. Expression of Aurora B protein also peaks during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle; Aurora B kinase activity peaks at the transition from metaphase to the end of mitosis. Aurora B associates with chromosomes during prophase prior to relocalizing to the spindle at anaphase. Aurora B regulates chromosome segregation through the control of microtubule-kinetochore attachment and cytokinesis. Expression of both Aurora A and Aurora B during the G2/M phase transition is tightly coordinated with histone H3 phosphorylation (4,5); research investigators have observed overexpression of these kinases in a variety of human cancers (2,4). Aurora C localizes to the centrosome from anaphase to cytokinesis and both mRNA and protein levels peak during G2/M phase. Although typical Aurora C expression is limited to the testis, research studies report overexpression of Aurora C is detected in various cancer cell lines (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-PLCgamma2 (Tyr1217) Antibody #3871.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Bcl-2 family consists of a number of evolutionarily conserved proteins containing Bcl-2 homology domains (BH) that regulate apoptosis through control of mitochondrial membrane permeability and release of cytochrome c (1-3). Four BH domains have been identified (BH1-4) that mediate protein interactions. The family can be separated into three groups based upon function and sequence homology: pro-survival members include Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, A1 and Bcl-w; pro-apoptotic proteins include Bax, Bak and Bok; and "BH3 only" proteins Bad, Bik, Bid, Puma, Bim, Bmf, Noxa and Hrk. Interactions between death-promoting and death-suppressing Bcl-2 family members has led to a rheostat model in which the ratio of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins controls cell fate (4). Thus, pro-survival members exert their behavior by binding to and antagonizing death-promoting members. In general, the "BH3-only members" can bind to and antagonize the pro-survival proteins leading to increased apoptosis (5). While some redundancy of this system likely exists, tissue specificity, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of many of these family members can account for distinct physiological roles.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation, but it has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegenerative diseases, infection, and cancer (3). Autophagy marker Light Chain 3 (LC3) was originally identified as a subunit of microtubule-associated proteins 1A and 1B (termed MAP1LC3) (4) and subsequently found to contain similarity to the yeast protein Apg8/Aut7/Cvt5 critical for autophagy (5). Three human LC3 isoforms (LC3A, LC3B, and LC3C) undergo post-translational modifications during autophagy (6-9). Cleavage of LC3 at the carboxy terminus immediately following synthesis yields the cytosolic LC3-I form. During autophagy, LC3-I is converted to LC3-II through lipidation by a ubiquitin-like system involving Atg7 and Atg3 that allows for LC3 to become associated with autophagic vesicles (6-10). The presence of LC3 in autophagosomes and the conversion of LC3 to the lower migrating form, LC3-II, have been used as indicators of autophagy (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Sphingomyelinases (SMases) catalyze the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide and phosphocholine (1). Ceramide is an important bioactive lipid triggering signal transduction involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation (1,2). A number of SMases have been described and categorized based on their optimum pH activity, cation dependence, tissue distribution, and subcellular localization (1). These include a lysosomal acid SMase, a Zn++-dependent secreted acid SMase, a membrane-bound Mg++-dependent neutral SMase, a Mg++-independent neutral SMase, and an alkaline SMase.

$111
20 µl
$261
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-1, or interleukin-1ß converting enzyme (ICE/ICEα), is a class I cysteine protease, which also includes caspases -4, -5, -11, and -12. Caspase-1 cleaves inflammatory cytokines such as pro-IL-1ß and interferon-γ inducing factor (IL-18) into their mature forms (1,2). Like other caspases, caspase-1 is proteolytically activated from a proenzyme to produce a tetramer of its two active subunits, p20 and p10. Caspase-1 has a large amino-terminal pro-domain that contains a caspase recruitment domain (CARD). Overexpression of caspase-1 can induce apoptosis (3). Mice deficient in caspase-1, however, have no overt defects in apoptosis but do have defects in the maturation of pro-IL-1β and are resistant to endotoxic shock (4,5). At least six caspase-1 isoforms have been identified, including caspase-1 α, β, γ, δ, ε and ζ (6). Most caspase-1 isoforms (α, β, γ and δ) produce products between 30-48 kDa and induce apoptosis upon over-expression. Caspase-1 ε typically contains only the p10 subunit, does not induce apoptosis and may act as a dominant negative. The widely expressed ζ isoform of caspase-1 induces apoptosis and lacks 39 amino-terminal residues found in the α isoform (6). Activation of caspase-1 occurs through an oligomerization molecular platform designated the "inflammasome" that includes caspase-5, Pycard/Asc, and NALP1 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The founding members of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) superfamily include pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-1β, and a third protein that acts as an IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA). At least six similar proteins have been recently identified, including a homolog of IL-1RA (IL1F5). The three better-characterized proteins (IL-1a, IL-1b and IL-1RA) are mainly expressed in macrophages, monocytes, and dendritic cells. IL-1a and IL-1b act as potent inflammatory cytokines that help regulate host defense and immune responses (1). Binding of these pro-inflammatory cytokines to an IL-1 receptor recruits adapter proteins (such as IRAK) to the receptor. Phosphorylation of these adaptor proteins promotes downstream signaling cascades associated with the immune response (2). Altered expression of both IL-1a and IL-1b is associated with an extensive list of human disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and various forms of cancer (3,4). IL-1RA acts as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, binding the IL-1 receptor to limit the response to inflammation (5). Because it plays a key role in regulating the inflammatory response, recombinant IL-1RA is a therapeutic agent used in the treatment of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Alternatively, mutation of the corresponding IL-1RA gene may be associated with susceptibility to the development of specific cancers (6).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2 (FRS2, also called Suc-associated neurotrophic factor-induced tyrosine-phosphorylated target or SNT) participates in the transmission of extracellular signals from the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). Activation of the FGFR leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of FRS2 (1). Two FRS2 family members have been identified, FRS2-alpha (SNT1) and FRS2-beta (SNT2) (2), which are phosphorylated by these RTKs. Once they are phosphorylated, they recruit SH2 domain-containing proteins including Grb2 and SHP-2 (3,4), mediating downstream signaling. Tyr436 is required for efficient SHP-2 recruitment (5), whereas Tyr196 functions as a docking site for Grb2-Sos complexes (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MOB1 was first identified in yeast as a protein that binds to Mps with essential roles in the completion of mitosis and the maintenance of ploidy (1). Its Drosophila and mammalian homologs, Mats and MOB1, respectively, are involved in the Hippo signaling tumor suppressor pathway, which plays a critical role in organ size regulation and which has been implicated in cancer development (2-5). There are two MOB1 proteins in humans, MOB1α and MOB1β, that are encoded by two different genes but which have greater than 95% amino acid sequence identity (6). Both forms bind to members of the nuclear Dbf2-related (NDR) kinases, such as LATS1/2 and NDR1/2, thereby stimulating kinase activity (7-9). This binding is promoted by the phosphorylation of MOB1 at several threonine residues by MST1 and/or MST2 (5,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Integrin-linked kinases (ILKs) couple integrins and growth factors to downstream pathways involved in cell survival, cell cycle control, cell-cell adhesion and cell motility (1). ILK functions as a scaffold bridging the extracellular matrix (ECM) and growth factor receptors to the actin cytoskeleton through interactions with integrin, PINCH (which links ILK to the RTKs via Nck2), CH-ILKBP and affixin (1). ILK phosphorylates Akt at Ser473, GSK-3 on Ser9, myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) on Ser18/Thr19, as well as affixin (2-5). These phosphorylation events are key regulatory steps in modulating the activities of the targets. ILK activity is stimulated by PI3 kinase and negatively regulated by the tumor suppressor PTEN and a PP2C protein phosphatase, ILKAP (1,3,6). It has been suggested that the conserved Ser343 residue in the activation loop plays a key role in the activation of ILK1 (2).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2 (FRS2, also called Suc-associated neurotrophic factor-induced tyrosine-phosphorylated target or SNT) participates in the transmission of extracellular signals from the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). Activation of the FGFR leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of FRS2 (1). Two FRS2 family members have been identified, FRS2-alpha (SNT1) and FRS2-beta (SNT2) (2), which are phosphorylated by these RTKs. Once they are phosphorylated, they recruit SH2 domain-containing proteins including Grb2 and SHP-2 (3,4), mediating downstream signaling. Tyr436 is required for efficient SHP-2 recruitment (5), whereas Tyr196 functions as a docking site for Grb2-Sos complexes (6).

PLCγ Antibody Sampler Kit provides an economical means of analyzing phospho and total PLCγ levels. PLCγ Antibody Sampler Kit contains enough primary and secondary antibodies to perform two western blot experiments with each antibody.

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ, and PLCε. Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulate the activity of PLC. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (2). PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783, and 1248 (3). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (4). PLCγ2 is engaged in antigen-dependent signaling in B cells and collagen-dependent signaling in platelets. Phosphorylation by Btk or Lck at Tyr753, 759, 1197, and 1217 is correlated with PLCγ2 activity (5,6).