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Product listing: Phospho-ASK1 (Thr845) Antibody, UniProt ID Q99683 #3765 to TNF-R2 Antibody, UniProt ID P20333 #3727

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), a MAP kinase kinase kinase, plays essential roles in stress-induced apoptosis (1,2). ASK1 is activated in response to a variety of stress-related stimuli through distinct mechanisms and activates MKK4 and MKK3, which in turn activate JNK and p38 (3). Overexpression of ASK1 activates JNK and p38 and induces apoptosis in several cell types through signals involving the mitochondrial cell death pathway. Embryonic fibroblasts or primary neurons derived from ASK1-/- mice are resistant to stress-induced JNK and p38 activation as well as cell death (4,5). Phosphorylation at Ser967 is essential for ASK1 association with 14-3-3 proteins and suppression of cell death (6). Oxidative stress induces dephosphorylation of Ser967 and phosphorylation of Thr845 in the activation loop of ASK1, both of which are correlated with ASK1 activity and ASK1-dependent apoptosis (7,8). Akt phosphorylates ASK1 at Ser83, which attenuates ASK1 activity and promotes cell survival (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), a MAP kinase kinase kinase, plays essential roles in stress-induced apoptosis (1,2). ASK1 is activated in response to a variety of stress-related stimuli through distinct mechanisms and activates MKK4 and MKK3, which in turn activate JNK and p38 (3). Overexpression of ASK1 activates JNK and p38 and induces apoptosis in several cell types through signals involving the mitochondrial cell death pathway. Embryonic fibroblasts or primary neurons derived from ASK1-/- mice are resistant to stress-induced JNK and p38 activation as well as cell death (4,5). Phosphorylation at Ser967 is essential for ASK1 association with 14-3-3 proteins and suppression of cell death (6). Oxidative stress induces dephosphorylation of Ser967 and phosphorylation of Thr845 in the activation loop of ASK1, both of which are correlated with ASK1 activity and ASK1-dependent apoptosis (7,8). Akt phosphorylates ASK1 at Ser83, which attenuates ASK1 activity and promotes cell survival (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), a MAP kinase kinase kinase, plays essential roles in stress-induced apoptosis (1,2). ASK1 is activated in response to a variety of stress-related stimuli through distinct mechanisms and activates MKK4 and MKK3, which in turn activate JNK and p38 (3). Overexpression of ASK1 activates JNK and p38 and induces apoptosis in several cell types through signals involving the mitochondrial cell death pathway. Embryonic fibroblasts or primary neurons derived from ASK1-/- mice are resistant to stress-induced JNK and p38 activation as well as cell death (4,5). Phosphorylation at Ser967 is essential for ASK1 association with 14-3-3 proteins and suppression of cell death (6). Oxidative stress induces dephosphorylation of Ser967 and phosphorylation of Thr845 in the activation loop of ASK1, both of which are correlated with ASK1 activity and ASK1-dependent apoptosis (7,8). Akt phosphorylates ASK1 at Ser83, which attenuates ASK1 activity and promotes cell survival (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor, also known as IP3R or InsP3R, is a member of the intracellular calcium release channel family and is located in the endoplasmic reticulum. IP3R functions as a Ca2+ release channel for intracellular stores of calcium ions. There are three types of IP3 receptors (IP3R1, 2, and 3) that require the second messenger inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) for activation (1). Four individual subunits homo- or hetero-oligomerize to form the receptor's functional channel (2). Phosphorylation of IP3R1 at Ser1756 by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) regulates the sensitivity of IP3R1 to IP3 and may be a mode of regulation for Ca2+ release (3,4). IP3R1-mediated Ca2+ release appears to have an effect on the induction of long term depression (LTD) in Purkinje cells (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SHP-1 (PTPN6) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase that is expressed primarily in hematopoietic cells. The enzyme is composed of two SH2 domains, a tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domain, and a carboxy-terminal regulatory domain (1). SHP-1 removes phosphates from target proteins to downregulate several tyrosine kinase-regulated pathways. In hematopoietic cells, the amino-terminal SH2 domain of SHP-1 binds to tyrosine phosphorylated erythropoietin receptors (EpoR) to negatively regulate hematopoietic growth (2). Overexpression of SHP-1 in epithelial cells results in dephosphorylation of the Ros receptor tyrosine kinase and subsequent downregulation of Ros-dependent cell proliferation and transformation (3). Following ligand binding in myeloid cells, SHP-1 associates with the IL-3R β chain and downregulates IL-3-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and cell proliferation (4). Because SHP-1 downregulates various proliferation pathways, SHP-1 is considered a potential tumor suppressor and angiogenesis regulator (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SNIP (SNAP25-interacting protein)/p140Cap (p130Cas-associated protein) is a cytoskeleton-associated protein identified initially in rat as a protein interacting with the brain-specific synaptosome protein SNAP25 (1) and subsequently as interacting with the broadly expressed scaffold protein p130Cas (2). SNAP25, a presynaptic protein implicated in neurotransmitter secretion, membrane fusion and neurite outgrowth, is part of the SNARE complex that includes syntaxin and synaptobrevin/VAMP (3). SNIP-SNAP25 association is mediated by coiled-coil interactions (1). Overexpression of SNIP inhibits calcium-dependent exocytosis in PC12 cells (1). Human and mouse orthologs of SNIP, termed p140Cap, were subsequently identified through association with p130Cas, a substrate of v-Src and v-Crk that is tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to cell adhesion and mitogenic stimuli (2,4,5). Expression of p140Cap was observed in brain, testis and epithelial-rich tissues and may exist in various alternatively spliced, tissue-specific isoforms (2). p140Cap is also tyrosine-phosphoryalated in response to adhesion molecules and EGF treatment (2). Together these studies suggest a role for SNIP/p140Cap in controlling cell spreading, migration and neurosecretion.

$305
50 assays
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody was conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescence in cells transfected with Myc-tagged protein.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: JunB is a basic region, leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor belonging to the Jun family that includes c-Jun and JunD. Jun family members homodimerize or heterodimerize with Fos and ATF proteins to form a functional transcription factor AP-1 (activator protein 1), whose activity is regulated by a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli such as growth factors, infections, and stress signals (1-4). While JunB sometimes antagonizes c-Jun transcriptional activity, it may functionally substitute for c-Jun during development in mice (5-7). JunB regulates hematopoietic stem cell number and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: JunB is a basic region, leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor belonging to the Jun family that includes c-Jun and JunD. Jun family members homodimerize or heterodimerize with Fos and ATF proteins to form a functional transcription factor AP-1 (activator protein 1), whose activity is regulated by a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli such as growth factors, infections, and stress signals (1-4). While JunB sometimes antagonizes c-Jun transcriptional activity, it may functionally substitute for c-Jun during development in mice (5-7). JunB regulates hematopoietic stem cell number and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SHP-2 (PTPN11) is a ubiquitously expressed, nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). It participates in signaling events downstream of receptors for growth factors, cytokines, hormones, antigens, and extracellular matrices in the control of cell growth, differentiation, migration, and death (1). Activation of SHP-2 and its association with Gab1 is critical for sustained Erk activation downstream of several growth factor receptors and cytokines (2). In addition to its role in Gab1-mediated Erk activation, SHP-2 attenuates EGF-dependent PI3 kinase activation by dephosphorylating Gab1 at p85 binding sites (3). SHP-2 becomes phosphorylated at Tyr542 and Tyr580 in its carboxy-terminus in response to growth factor receptor activation (4). These phosphorylation events are thought to relieve basal inhibition and stimulate SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase activity (5). Mutations in the corresponding gene result in a pair of clinically similar disorders (Noonan syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome) that may result from abnormal MAPK regulation (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SHP-2 (PTPN11) is a ubiquitously expressed, nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). It participates in signaling events downstream of receptors for growth factors, cytokines, hormones, antigens, and extracellular matrices in the control of cell growth, differentiation, migration, and death (1). Activation of SHP-2 and its association with Gab1 is critical for sustained Erk activation downstream of several growth factor receptors and cytokines (2). In addition to its role in Gab1-mediated Erk activation, SHP-2 attenuates EGF-dependent PI3 kinase activation by dephosphorylating Gab1 at p85 binding sites (3). SHP-2 becomes phosphorylated at Tyr542 and Tyr580 in its carboxy-terminus in response to growth factor receptor activation (4). These phosphorylation events are thought to relieve basal inhibition and stimulate SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase activity (5). Mutations in the corresponding gene result in a pair of clinically similar disorders (Noonan syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome) that may result from abnormal MAPK regulation (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are α/β heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins with distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with the extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2).Integrin α6 is a 120 kDa protein with two splice variants, integrin α6, 6A and 6B (3), which function as receptors for laminins on the basal membrane to mediate cellular adhesion events (4-6). α6 integrins have been shown to play an important role in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell homing to the bone marrow.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO, ALOX5) is an important catalytic enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of leukotriene LTA4 from arachidonic acid (1,2). Leukotriene synthesis also requires 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP, ALOX5AP), a nuclear membrane-bound protein that binds arachidonic acid and is thought to activate 5-LO. A number of related leukotrienes (i.e. B4, C4, D4) are derived from LTA4 and together these lipid mediators function in immune reaction regulation. 5-LO is primarily expressed in polymorphonuclear leukocytes, peripheral blood monocytes, macrophages, and mast cells (1,3). Overexpression of 5-LO protein is seen in certain cancer cells and is associated with poor diagnosis (1,4). Depending upon the cell type, 5-LO is localized to either the cytosol or the nucleus of quiescent cells (5). Following stimulation, 5-LO translocates to the nucleus and associates with FLAP to catalyze LTA4 synthesis (2,3). Phosphorylation of specific residues can regulate 5-LO enzymatic activity. Phosphorylation of 5-LO at Ser523 by PKA family kinases inhibits oxygenase activity (6,7) while MAPKAP2 and ERK family kinase phosphorylation at Ser271 and Ser663 stimulates 5-LO enzymatic activity in vivo (8,9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO, ALOX5) is an important catalytic enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of leukotriene LTA4 from arachidonic acid (1,2). Leukotriene synthesis also requires 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP, ALOX5AP), a nuclear membrane-bound protein that binds arachidonic acid and is thought to activate 5-LO. A number of related leukotrienes (i.e. B4, C4, D4) are derived from LTA4 and together these lipid mediators function in immune reaction regulation. 5-LO is primarily expressed in polymorphonuclear leukocytes, peripheral blood monocytes, macrophages, and mast cells (1,3). Overexpression of 5-LO protein is seen in certain cancer cells and is associated with poor diagnosis (1,4). Depending upon the cell type, 5-LO is localized to either the cytosol or the nucleus of quiescent cells (5). Following stimulation, 5-LO translocates to the nucleus and associates with FLAP to catalyze LTA4 synthesis (2,3). Phosphorylation of specific residues can regulate 5-LO enzymatic activity. Phosphorylation of 5-LO at Ser523 by PKA family kinases inhibits oxygenase activity (6,7) while MAPKAP2 and ERK family kinase phosphorylation at Ser271 and Ser663 stimulates 5-LO enzymatic activity in vivo (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: JunB is a basic region, leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor belonging to the Jun family that includes c-Jun and JunD. Jun family members homodimerize or heterodimerize with Fos and ATF proteins to form a functional transcription factor AP-1 (activator protein 1), whose activity is regulated by a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli such as growth factors, infections, and stress signals (1-4). While JunB sometimes antagonizes c-Jun transcriptional activity, it may functionally substitute for c-Jun during development in mice (5-7). JunB regulates hematopoietic stem cell number and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TAK1 is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase activated by TGF-β and various pro-inflammatory signals (1,2). In vivo, TAK1 activation requires its association with TAK1 binding protein 1 (TAB1), which triggers TAK1 autophosphorylation at Thr184 and Thr187 (3,4). The TAB2 adaptor protein links TAK1 with TRAF6 to mediate TAK1 activation following IL-1 stimulation (5). Once activated, TAK1 phosphorylates the MAPK kinases MKK4 and MKK3/6, which activate JNK and p38 MAPK, respectively. TAK1 and TRAF6 also activate the NF-κB pathway by phosphorylating the NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK) to trigger subsequent activation of IKK (2,6). In addition to TAK1, TAB1 interacts with and activates p38α MAPK (7). Targeted disruption of the TAB1 gene in mice causes a drastic reduction in TAK1 activity and leads to embryonic lethality (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Antiviral innate immunity depends on the combination of parallel pathways triggered by virus detecting proteins in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family and RNA helicases, such as Rig-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) and MDA-5 (melanoma differentiation-associated antigen 5), which promote the transcription of type I interferons (IFN) and antiviral enzymes (1-3). TLRs and helicase proteins contain sites that recognize the molecular patterns of different virus types, including DNA, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and glycoproteins. These antiviral proteins are found in different cell compartments; TLRs (i.e. TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9) are expressed on endosomal membranes and helicases are localized to the cytoplasm. Rig-I expression is induced by retinoic acid, LPS, IFN, and viral infection (4,5). Both Rig-I and MDA-5 share a DExD/H-box helicase domain that detects viral dsRNA and two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARD) that are required for triggering downstream signaling (4-7). Rig-I binds both dsRNA and viral ssRNA that contains a 5'-triphosphate end not seen in host RNA (8,9). Though structurally related, Rig-I and MDA-5 detect a distinct set of viruses (10,11). The CARD domain of the helicases, which is sufficient to generate signaling and IFN production, is recruited to the CARD domain of the MAVS/VISA/Cardif/IPS-1 mitochondrial protein, which triggers activation of NF-κB, TBK1/IKKε, and IRF-3/IRF-7 (12-15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: The E2F transcription factors are essential for regulation of the cell cycle (1,2). Physiological E2F is a heterodimer composed of an E2F subunit together with a DP subunit (3, 4). Six members of the E2F family have been identified, and each E2F subunit has a DNA binding and a dimerization domain. E2F-1 to -5 activate transcription. E2F-1 to -3 bind pRb, and E2F-4 and -5 bind p107 or p130, and these interactions are under cell cycle control (5-8). E2F-1 has oncogenic properties in vivo and in vitro. E2F-1 can induce apoptosis through p53-dependent and -independent mechanisms. E2F-1 is stress-responsive, and is regulated by a PI3-kinase-like kinase family such as the ATM/ATR kinases (9-11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activity of the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 is regulated by T-loop phosphorylation, by the abundance of their cyclin partners (the D-type cyclins), and by association with CDK inhibitors of the Cip/Kip or INK family of proteins (1). The inactive ternary complex of cyclin D/CDK4 and p27 Kip1 requires extracellular mitogenic stimuli for the release and degradation of p27 concomitant with a rise in cyclin D levels to affect progression through the restriction point and Rb-dependent entry into S-phase (2). The active complex of cyclin D/CDK4 targets the retinoblastoma protein for phosphorylation, allowing the release of E2F transcription factors that activate G1/S-phase gene expression (3). Levels of cyclin D protein drop upon withdrawal of growth factors through downregulation of protein expression and phosphorylation-dependent degradation (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF1/CXCL12) is a small, pro-inflammatory chemoattractant cytokine that regulates leukocyte trafficking through interactions with its cognate 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (1). The SDF1/CXCL12 receptor, CXCR4, also serves as a coreceptor for the entry of human immunodeficiency virus into target cells (2). SDF1/CXCL12 may regulate homing and maintenance of CXCR4-expressing stem or progenitor cells, including embryonic and many somatic stem cells (3,4). Many cancer cells express CXCR4, suggesting that SDF1/CXCL12 plays a role in cancer metastasis (5,6). Alternative splicing and differential processing during maturation produce a pair of SDF1/CXCL12 isoforms (SDF1/CXCL12α and SDF1/CXCL12β) that have different properties and biological activities (7). Additional isoforms of SDF1/CXCL12 have been reported (8,9).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry in cells transfected with Myc-tagged protein.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Epitope tags are useful for the labeling and detection of proteins using immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunostaining techniques. Because of their small size, they are unlikely to affect the tagged protein’s biochemical properties.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of proteins activated in response to nutrient deprivation and in neurodegenerative conditions (1). One of the proteins critical to this process is Beclin-1, the mammalian orthologue of the yeast autophagy protein Apg6/Vps30 (2). Beclin-1 can complement defects in yeast autophagy caused by loss of Apg6 and can also stimulate autophagy when overexpressed in mammalian cells (3). Mammalian Beclin-1 was originally isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen for Bcl-2 interacting proteins and has been shown to interact with Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, but not with Bax or Bak (4). While Beclin-1 is generally ubiquitously expressed, research studies have shown it is monoallelically deleted in 40-75% of sporadic human breast and ovarian cancers (5). Beclin-1 is localized within cytoplasmic structures including the mitochondria, although overexpression of Beclin-1 reveals some nuclear staining and CRM1-dependent nuclear export (6). Investigators have demonstrated that Beclin-1-/- mice die early in embryogenesis and Beclin-1-/+ mice have a high incidence of spontaneous tumors. Stem cells from the null mice demonstrate an altered autophagic response, although responses to apoptosis appeared normal (7). Researchers have also found that overexpression of Beclin-1 in virally infected neurons in vivo resulted in significant protection against Sindbis virus-induced disease and neuronal apoptosis (4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, stem cell self-renewal, cell cycle regulation and oncogenesis by maintaining the silenced state of genes that promote cell lineage specification, cell death and cell-cycle arrest (1-4). PcG proteins exist in two complexes that cooperate to maintain long-term gene silencing through epigenetic chromatin modifications. The first complex, EED-EZH2, is recruited to genes by DNA-binding transcription factors and methylates histone H3 on Lys27. Methylation of Lys27 facilitates the recruitment of the second complex, PRC1, which ubiquitinylates histone H2A on Lys119 (5). Suppressor of Zeste 12 (SUZ12) is a component of the PRC2 complex, which together with Ezh2 and Eed is absolutely required for histone methyl-transferase activity (6). SUZ12 contains a C2H2 zinc finger domain similar to the zinc finger domains found in sequence-specific DNA binding proteins and may mediate the interaction between EZH2 and nucleosomes (6). SUZ12 is overexpressed in several human tumors, including tumors of the colon, breast and liver (7,8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α is an important cytokine produced by numerous cell types including neutrophils, activated lymphoctyes, macrophages and NK cells. It plays a critical role in inflammatory responses and in apoptosis (1). TNF-α exists as a membrane-anchored and soluble form, both of which show biological activity. Response to TNF-α is mediated through two receptors, TNF-R1, which is widely expressed, and TNF-R2, which is expressed mainly in immune and endothelial cells (2). Antagonists to TNF-α have been validated as therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis and other immune disorders (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: GP130 is a signal-transducing subunit shared by the receptors for the IL-6 family of cytokines (1-3). The binding of a ligand to its receptor induces the dimerization of GP130, leading to activation of the Jak tyrosine kinase and to tyrosine phosphorylation of GP130. These events lead to the activation of multiple signal-transduction pathways, such as the Stat, Ras-MAPK and PI3 kinase pathways, whose activation is controlled by distinct regions of GP130 (4-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2) is a type I transmembrane protein and member of the neurexin superfamily that mediates nervous system cell-cell interactions through the Neurexin IV-Caspr-Paranodin (NCP) complex (1). A multiprotein complex consisting of TAG-1, Caspr2, K+ channel, PSD95 and protein 4.1B mediates the molecular interactions at the juxtaparanodal region of myelinated axons, with homophilic TAG-1 interactions mediating the binding of this complex to glia (2,3).Caspr2 protein localizes to juxtaparanodal regions of myelinated axons where it forms a cis-complex with the immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule TAG-1. Caspr2 also binds to Shaker K+ channels Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and their Kvβ2 subunit. A PDZ domain at the Caspr2 carboxy terminus mediates the Caspr2-K+ channel association. Caspr2 is required for proper K+ channel localization, as Caspr2 deletion causes the redistribution of channels along the internodes (1-3). Furthermore, Caspr2 binds to protein 4.1B and connects the protein complex to the axonal cytoskeleton (4). Mutations in the Caspr2 gene have been linked to focal epilepsy, cortical dysplasia and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: SPAK (STE20/SPS1-related Pro/Ala-rich kinase) and OSR1 (oxidative stress responsive 1) are members of the GCK family serine/threonine kinases. Overexpression and in vitro studies demonstrate that SPAK is able to activate p38 MAP kinase indicating a possible role for SPAK in the stress response (1). Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that SPAK and OSR1 bind to Na-K-2Cl cotransporters NKCC1 and NKCC2 and K-Cl cotransporter KCC3 (2). WNK1 and WNK4 phosphorylate SPAK at Thr243/247 and Ser380 (3-5). Similarly, WNK1 and WNK4 phosphorylate OSR1 at Thr185 and Ser315 (3,4). Phosphorylation at these sites stimulates SPAK and OSR1 activity, leading to NKCC1 phosphorylation and enhanced NKCC1 activity (3-5). SPAK is also phosphorylated at Ser311 by PKCθ in response to T cell activation. Substitution of Ser311 with Ala or specific siRNA knock-down of SPAK dramatically reduces TCR/CD28-induced AP-1 activation, suggesting SPAK is involved in T cell signaling as well (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Embryonic stem cells (ESC) derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst are unique in their pluripotent capacity and potential for self-renewal (1). Research studies demonstrate that a set of transcription factors that includes Oct-4, Sox2, and Nanog forms a transcriptional network that maintains cells in a pluripotent state (2,3). Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Sox2 and Oct-4 bind to thousands of gene regulatory sites, many of which regulate cell pluripotency and early embryonic development (4,5). siRNA knockdown of either Sox2 or Oct-4 results in loss of pluripotency (6). Induced overexpression of Oct-4 and Sox2, along with additional transcription factors Klf4 and c-Myc, can reprogram both mouse and human somatic cells to a pluripotent state (7,8). Additional evidence demonstrates that Sox2 is also present in adult multipotent progenitors that give rise to some adult epithelial tissues, including several glands, the glandular stomach, testes, and cervix. Sox2 is thought to regulate target gene expression important for survival and regeneration of these tissues (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α is an important cytokine produced by numerous cell types including neutrophils, activated lymphoctyes, macrophages and NK cells. It plays a critical role in inflammatory responses and in apoptosis (1). TNF-α exists as a membrane-anchored and soluble form, both of which show biological activity. Response to TNF-α is mediated through two receptors, TNF-R1, which is widely expressed, and TNF-R2, which is expressed mainly in immune and endothelial cells (2). Antagonists to TNF-α have been validated as therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis and other immune disorders (3).