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Product listing: Phospho-Ret (Tyr905) Antibody, UniProt ID P07949 #3221 to PKM1/2 Antibody, UniProt ID P14618 #3186

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Ret proto-oncogene (c-Ret) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that functions as a multicomponent receptor complex in conjunction with other membrane-bound, ligand-binding GDNF family receptors (1). Ligands that bind the Ret receptor include the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its congeners neurturin, persephin, and artemin (2-4). Research studies have shown that alterations in the corresponding RET gene are associated with diseases including papillary thyroid carcinoma, multiple endocrine neoplasia (type 2A and 2B), familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, and a congenital developmental disorder known as Hirschsprung’s disease (1,3). The Tyr905 residue located in the Ret kinase domain plays a crucial role in Ret catalytic and biological activity. Substitution of Phe for Tyr at position 905 dramatically inhibits Ret autophosphorylation activity (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Ret proto-oncogene (c-Ret) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that functions as a multicomponent receptor complex in conjunction with other membrane-bound, ligand-binding GDNF family receptors (1). Ligands that bind the Ret receptor include the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its congeners neurturin, persephin, and artemin (2-4). Research studies have shown that alterations in the corresponding RET gene are associated with diseases including papillary thyroid carcinoma, multiple endocrine neoplasia (type 2A and 2B), familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, and a congenital developmental disorder known as Hirschsprung’s disease (1,3). The Tyr905 residue located in the Ret kinase domain plays a crucial role in Ret catalytic and biological activity. Substitution of Phe for Tyr at position 905 dramatically inhibits Ret autophosphorylation activity (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), also referred to as Apo2 ligand, first identified based on its sequence homology to TNF and Fas/Apo ligand is a member of the TNF family of cytokines and either exists as a type II membrane or soluble protein (1,2). TRAIL induces apoptosis in a variety of transformed cell lines and plays a role in anti-tumor and anti-viral immune surveillance (3). TRAIL signals via binding with death receptors DR4 (TRAIL-R1) (4) and DR5 (TRAIL-R2) (5-8) which can trigger apoptosis as well as NF-κB activation (7,9). Death domains on these receptors leads to the recruitment of a death-induced signaling complex (DISC) leading to caspase-8 and subsequent caspase-3 activation. In addition, TRAIL binds with decoy receptors DcR1 (TRAIL-R3) (10-13) and DcR2 (TRAIL-R4, TRUNDD) (14-15) which lack the functional cytoplasmic death domain antagonizing TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) has also been identified as receptor capable of inhibiting TRAIL-induced apoptosis (16). The selectivity of soluble TRAIL at triggering apoptosis in transformed cells as compared to normal cells has led to its investigation as a potential cancer therapeutic (17-18).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dishevelled (Dsh) proteins are important intermediates of Wnt signaling pathways. Dsh inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3β promoting β-catenin stabilization. Dsh proteins also participate in the planar cell polarity pathway by acting through JNK (1,2). There are three Dsh homologs, Dvl1, Dvl2 and Dvl3 in mammals. Upon treatment with Wnt proteins, Dvls become hyperphosphorylated (3) and accumulate in the nucleus (4). Dvl proteins also associate with actin fibers and cytoplasmic vesicular membranes (5) and mediate endocytosis of the Fzd receptor after Wnt protein stimulation (6). Overexpression of Dvl has been reported in certain cancers (7,8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), also termed Cap43, Drg1, RTP/rit42, and Proxy-1, is a member of the NDRG family, which is composed of four members (NDRG1-4) that function in growth, differentiation, and cell survival (1-5). NDRG1 is ubiquitously expressed and highly responsive to a variety of stress signals including DNA damage (4), hypoxia (5), and elevated levels of nickel and calcium (2). Expression of NDRG1 is elevated in N-myc defective mice and is negatively regulated by N- and c-myc (1,6). During DNA damage, NDRG1 is induced in a p53-dependent fashion and is necessary for p53-mediated apoptosis (4,7). Research studies have shown that NDRG1 may also play a role in cancer progression by promoting differentiation, inhibiting growth, and modulating metastasis and angiogenesis (3,4,6,8,9). Nonsense mutation of the NDRG1 gene has been shown to cause hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom (HMSNL), which is supported by studies demonstrating the role of NDRG1 in maintaining myelin sheaths and axonal survival (10,11). NDRG1 is up-regulated during mast cell maturation and its deletion leads to attenuated allergic responses (12). Both NDRG1 and NDRG2 are substrates of SGK1, although the precise physiological role of SGK1-mediated phosphorylation is not known (13). NDRG1 is phosphorylated by SGK1 at Thr328, Ser330, Thr346, Thr356, and Thr366. Phosphorylation by SGK1 primes NDRG1 for phosphorylation by GSK-3.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dishevelled (Dsh) proteins are important intermediates of Wnt signaling pathways. Dsh inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3β promoting β-catenin stabilization. Dsh proteins also participate in the planar cell polarity pathway by acting through JNK (1,2). There are three Dsh homologs, Dvl1, Dvl2 and Dvl3 in mammals. Upon treatment with Wnt proteins, Dvls become hyperphosphorylated (3) and accumulate in the nucleus (4). Dvl proteins also associate with actin fibers and cytoplasmic vesicular membranes (5) and mediate endocytosis of the Fzd receptor after Wnt protein stimulation (6). Overexpression of Dvl has been reported in certain cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The sequence-specific transcription factor activator protein 2α (AP-2α) is required for normal growth and morphogenesis during mammalian development (1,2). Decreased or loss of AP-2α expression has been observed in many different types of human cancers including breast cancer (3,4), ovarian cancer (5), melanoma (6) and prostate cancer (7). These findings suggest that AP-2α expression plays a crucial role in tumorigenicity. Studies have also shown that p53 overexpression in human breast carcinoma cells induces the level of AP-2α expression. Furthermore, p53 binds to the cis-element in the AP-2α promoter, suggesting that AP-2α is a target of p53. AP-2α may mediate the effect of p53 to inhibit cell proliferation (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Etk, also known as BMX, is a member of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) family (1). It is expressed in a variety of hematopoietic, epithelial and endothelial cells. Etk, like other Btk family members, contains a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and Src homology SH3 and SH2 domains. It participates in multiple signal transduction pathways (2). Phosphorylation of Tyr566 by Src kinase is required for activation of Etk in vivo (3). In endothelial and epithelial cells, Etk is regulated by FAK through phosphorylation at Tyr40 (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (Mic-1), also termed GDF15 (1), PTGF-β (2), PLAB (3), PDF (4), and NAG-1 (5), is a divergent member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily (6). Like other family members, Mic-1 is synthesized as an inactive precursor that undergoes proteolytic processing involving removal of an N-terminal hydrophobic signal sequence followed by cleavage at a conserved RXXR site generating an active C-terminal domain that is secreted as a dimeric protein. Mic-1 is highly expressed in the placenta and is also dramatically increased by cellular stress, acute injury, inflammation, and cancer. In the brain, Mic-1 is found in the choroid plexus and is secreted into the cerebrospinal fluid (7). It is also a transcriptional target of the p53 tumor suppressor protein and may serve as a biomarker for p53 activity (8,9). During tumor progression, Mic-1 has various effects on apoptosis, differentiation, angiogenisis, and metastasis, and may also contribute to weight loss during cancer (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The sequence-specific transcription factor activator protein 2α (AP-2α) is required for normal growth and morphogenesis during mammalian development (1,2). Decreased or loss of AP-2α expression has been observed in many different types of human cancers including breast cancer (3,4), ovarian cancer (5), melanoma (6) and prostate cancer (7). These findings suggest that AP-2α expression plays a crucial role in tumorigenicity. Studies have also shown that p53 overexpression in human breast carcinoma cells induces the level of AP-2α expression. Furthermore, p53 binds to the cis-element in the AP-2α promoter, suggesting that AP-2α is a target of p53. AP-2α may mediate the effect of p53 to inhibit cell proliferation (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: α-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR), an enzyme localized in peroxisomes and mitochondria, is involved in the β-oxidation of branched-chain fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives (1). AMACR has been reported to be a biomarker for prostate cancer (2-4). The expression of AMACR is also related to other types of cancers such as hepatocellular carcinoma (1), noninvasive bladder cancer (5), colorectal cancer (6) and gastric adenocarcinoma (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) is a cytosolic selenoprotein which reduces hydrogen peroxide to water (1). GPX1 is the most abundant and ubiquitous among the five GPX isoforms identified so far (2). It is an important component in the anti-oxidative defense in cells and is associated with a variety of disease conditions, such as colon cancer (3), coronary artery disease (4) and insulin resistance (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and CO2 in the presence of NAD+. Acetyl-CoA then goes into the citric acid cycle where it reacts with oxaloacetate to form citrate. Acetyl-CoA is also used for fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. The reaction of oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate therefore serves as a critical link between glycolysis and the citric acid cycle and lipid metabolism. In mammalian cells, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is located in the mitochondrial matrix (1). This complex is comprised of three enzymes: pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1), dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (E2) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3). Pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) consists of two subunits: α and β. This enzyme catalyzes the removal of CO2 from pyruvate. Mutations in the α subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) lead to congenital defects that are usually associated with lactic acidosis, neurodegeneration and early death (2).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) is one of the major substrates of the insulin receptor kinase (1). IRS-1 contains multiple tyrosine phosphorylation motifs that serve as docking sites for SH2-domain containing proteins that mediate the metabolic and growth-promoting functions of insulin (2-4). IRS-1 also contains over 30 potential serine/threonine phosphorylation sites. Ser307 of IRS-1 is phosphorylated by JNK (5) and IKK (6) while Ser789 is phosphorylated by SIK-2, a member of the AMPK family (7). The PKC and mTOR pathways mediate phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser612 and Ser636/639, respectively (8,9). Phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser1101 is mediated by PKCθ and results in an inhibition of insulin signaling in the cell, suggesting a potential mechanism for insulin resistance in some models of obesity (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Androgen receptor (AR), a zinc finger transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, is activated by phosphorylation and dimerization upon ligand binding (1). This promotes nuclear localization and binding of AR to androgen response elements in androgen target genes. Research studies have shown that AR plays a crucial role in several stages of male development and the progression of prostate cancer (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cellular oncogene c-Yes and its viral homologue v-Yes (the transforming gene of Yamaguchi 73 and Esh avian sarcoma viruses) encode a 60 kDa, cytoplasmic, membrane-associated, protein-tyrosine kinase (1). Yes belongs to the Src kinase family and is ubiquitously expressed in many tissues and cells. Like other Src family members, Yes contains several conserved functional domains such as an N-terminal myristoylation sequence for membrane targeting, SH2 and SH3 domains, a kinase domain, and a C-terminal non-catalytic domain (2). Although several lines of evidence support redundancy in signaling between Yes and other Src family kinases, there is also a growing body of evidence indicating specificity in Yes signaling (2). Yes is activated downstream of a multitude of cell surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases, G protein-coupled receptors, and cytokine receptors (3). In addition, both Yes and Src kinases are activated during the cell cycle transition from G2 to M phase (3). Investigators have found that dysfunction of Yes is associated with the development of various cancers (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SynGAP is a synaptic GTPase-activating protein selectively expressed in the brain and found at higher concentrations specifically at excitatory synapses in the mammalian forebrain. SynGAP has a PH domain, a C2 domain, and a highly conserved RasGAP domain, which negatively regulates both Ras activity and its downstream signaling pathways. SynGAP interacts with the PDZ domains of SAP102, as well as PSD95, a postsynaptic scaffolding protein that couples SynGAP to NMDA receptors (1). SynGAP is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) at Ser765 and Ser1123, among other sites (2,3). Phosphorylation of SynGAP results in stimulation of the GTPase activity of Ras, and PSD95 dependent CaMKII phosphorylation of SynGAP increases after transient brain ischemia (1,4). SynGAP is implicated in NMDAR- and CaMKII-dependent regulation of AMPAR trafficking and plays an important role in synaptic plasticity (3,5). SynGAP is critical during neuronal development as mice lacking SynGAP protein die postnatally. Furthermore, SynGAP mutant mice have reduced long-term potentiation (LTP) and perform poorly in spatial memory tasks (6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated E-Cadherin (24E10) Rabbit mAb #3195.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Pyruvate kinase is a glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. In mammals, the M1 isoform (PKM1) is expressed in most adult tissues (1). The M2 isoform (PKM2) is an alternatively spliced variant of M1 that is expressed during embryonic development (1). Research studies found that cancer cells exclusively express PKM2 (1-3). PKM2 is shown to be essential for aerobic glycolysis in tumors, known as the Warburg effect (1). When cancer cells switch from the M2 isoform to the M1 isoform, aerobic glycolysis is reduced and oxidative phosphorylation is increased (1). These cells also show decreased tumorigenicity in mouse xenografts (1). Recent studies showed that PKM2 is not essential for all tumor cells (4). In the tumor model studied, PKM2 was found to be active in the non-proliferative tumor cell population and inactive in the proliferative tumor cell population (4).

$388
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunofluorescence (Paraffin), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a 170 kDa transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Research studies have shown that somatic mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of EGF receptor (EGFR) are present in a subset of lung adenocarinomas that respond to EGFR inhibitors, such as gefinitib and erlotinib (1-3). Two types of mutations account for approximately 90% of mutated cases: a specific point mutation, L858R, that occurs in exon 21 and short in-frame deletions in exon 19 (4,5). The most frequent exon 19 deletion is E746-A750, accounting for 90% of lesions at this site, although some rare variants occur.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors are a family of broad-spectrum growth factors influencing a plethora of cellular activities. The interaction of at least 23 ligands, 4 receptors and multiple coreceptors provides a dramatic complexity to a signaling system capable of effecting a multitude of responses (1,2). Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF2), initially identified as a mitogen with prominent angiogenic properties, is now recognized as a multifunctional growth factor (3). It is clear that bFGF produces its biological effects in target cells by signaling through cell-surface FGF receptors. bFGF binds to all four FGF receptors. Ligand binding induces receptor dimerization and autophosphorylation, allowing binding and activation of cytoplasmic downstream target proteins, including FRS-2, PLC and Crk (4,5). The FGF signaling pathway appears to play a significant role not only in normal cell growth regulation but also in tumor development and progression (6).Acidic FGF (aFGF or FGF1) is another extensively investigated protein of the FGF family. aFGF shares 55% DNA sequence homology with bFGF. These two growth factors are ubiquitously expressed and exhibit a wide spectrum of similiar biological activities with quantitative differences likely due to variation in receptor affinity or binding (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) is one of the major substrates of the insulin receptor kinase (1). IRS-1 contains multiple tyrosine phosphorylation motifs that serve as docking sites for SH2-domain containing proteins that mediate the metabolic and growth-promoting functions of insulin (2-4). IRS-1 also contains over 30 potential serine/threonine phosphorylation sites. Ser307 of IRS-1 is phosphorylated by JNK (5) and IKK (6) while Ser789 is phosphorylated by SIK-2, a member of the AMPK family (7). The PKC and mTOR pathways mediate phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser612 and Ser636/639, respectively (8,9). Phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser1101 is mediated by PKCθ and results in an inhibition of insulin signaling in the cell, suggesting a potential mechanism for insulin resistance in some models of obesity (10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) is one of the major substrates of the insulin receptor kinase (1). IRS-1 contains multiple tyrosine phosphorylation motifs that serve as docking sites for SH2-domain containing proteins that mediate the metabolic and growth-promoting functions of insulin (2-4). IRS-1 also contains over 30 potential serine/threonine phosphorylation sites. Ser307 of IRS-1 is phosphorylated by JNK (5) and IKK (6) while Ser789 is phosphorylated by SIK-2, a member of the AMPK family (7). The PKC and mTOR pathways mediate phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser612 and Ser636/639, respectively (8,9). Phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser1101 is mediated by PKCθ and results in an inhibition of insulin signaling in the cell, suggesting a potential mechanism for insulin resistance in some models of obesity (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is an eIF2α kinase and transmembrane protein resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane that couples ER stress signals to translation inhibition (1-3). ER stress increases the activity of PERK, which then phosphorylates eIF2α to promote reduced translation. Research studies have demonstrated that PERK-deficient mice have defects in pancreatic β cells several weeks after birth, suggesting a role for PERK-mediated translational control in protecting secretory cells from ER stress (4). PERK activation during ER stress correlates with autophosphorylation of its cytoplasmic kinase domain (1-3). Phosphorylation of PERK at Thr980 serves as a marker for its activation status.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Pyruvate kinase is a glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. In mammals, the M1 isoform (PKM1) is expressed in most adult tissues (1). The M2 isoform (PKM2) is an alternatively spliced variant of M1 that is expressed during embryonic development (1). Research studies found that cancer cells exclusively express PKM2 (1-3). PKM2 is shown to be essential for aerobic glycolysis in tumors, known as the Warburg effect (1). When cancer cells switch from the M2 isoform to the M1 isoform, aerobic glycolysis is reduced and oxidative phosphorylation is increased (1). These cells also show decreased tumorigenicity in mouse xenografts (1). Recent studies showed that PKM2 is not essential for all tumor cells (4). In the tumor model studied, PKM2 was found to be active in the non-proliferative tumor cell population and inactive in the proliferative tumor cell population (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fatty acid synthase (FASN) catalyzes the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids from acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA. FASN is active as a homodimer with seven different catalytic activities and produces lipids in the liver for export to metabolically active tissues or storage in adipose tissue. In most other human tissues, FASN is minimally expressed since they rely on circulating fatty acids for new structural lipid synthesis (1).According to the research literature, increased expression of FASN has emerged as a phenotype common to most human carcinomas. For example in breast cancer, immunohistochemical staining showed that the levels of FASN are directly related to the size of breast tumors (2). Research studies also showed that FASN is highly expressed in lung and prostate cancers and that FASN expression is an indicator of poor prognosis in breast and prostate cancer (3-5). Furthermore, inhibition of FASN is selectively cytotoxic to human cancer cells (5). Thus, increased interest has focused on FASN as a potential target for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer as well as metabolic syndrome (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Aldolase (fructose bisphosphate aldolase), a glycolytic enzyme, catalyzes the conversion of fructose 1, 6-bisphosphate to 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde. This ubiquitous enzyme is present as three different isozymes: aldolase A, aldolase B, and aldolase C. Research studies suggest that aldolase A expression potentially differentiates between nonneoplastic liver diseases and hepatocarcinoma (1). Furthermore, investigators have shown that changes in aldolase B gene expression levels have been observed in certain patients with this primary tumor (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is a flavoprotein that catalyzes the two-electron reduction of quinones and their derivatives (1,2). This enzyme protects cells against redox cycling and oxidative stress (1,3). The expression of NQO1 is increased in liver, colon and breast tumors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with the normal tissues (1,2). Moreover, expression levels are also elevated in developing tumors, suggesting a role for NQO1 in the prevention of tumor development (1). Studies on NQO1 knockout mice suggest that the lack of NQO1 enzymatic activity changes intracellular redox states resulting in a reduction in apoptosis, which in turn leads to myeloid hyperplasia of bone marrow (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Pyruvate kinase is a glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. In mammals, the M1 isoform (PKM1) is expressed in most adult tissues (1). The M2 isoform (PKM2) is an alternatively spliced variant of M1 that is expressed during embryonic development (1). Research studies found that cancer cells exclusively express PKM2 (1-3). PKM2 is shown to be essential for aerobic glycolysis in tumors, known as the Warburg effect (1). When cancer cells switch from the M2 isoform to the M1 isoform, aerobic glycolysis is reduced and oxidative phosphorylation is increased (1). These cells also show decreased tumorigenicity in mouse xenografts (1). Recent studies showed that PKM2 is not essential for all tumor cells (4). In the tumor model studied, PKM2 was found to be active in the non-proliferative tumor cell population and inactive in the proliferative tumor cell population (4).