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Product listing: Lck (73A5) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P06239 #2787 to Fgr Antibody, UniProt ID P09769 #2755

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, which includes Src, Lyn, Fyn, Yes, Lck, Blk, and Hck, are important in the regulation of growth and differentiation of eukaryotic cells (1). Src activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation at two sites, but with opposing effects. While phosphorylation at Tyr416 in the activation loop of the kinase domain upregulates enzyme activity, phosphorylation at Tyr527 in the carboxy-terminal tail by Csk renders the enzyme less active (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: INCENP (inner centromere protein antigens 135 kDa, 155 kDa) is a chromosomal passenger protein crucial for multiple events that mediate chromosome separation during mitosis (1). At prophase INCENP is associated with chromatin whereas during prometaphase and metaphase it translocates to the inner centromere (1). Depletion of INCENP results in aberrant chromosome alignment at the metaphase plate, incomplete chromosome separation, and disruption of proper spindle formation and cytokinesis (2). INCENP is part of the chromosomal passenger complex that also contains Aurora B, borealin and survivin (2). Aurora B and INCENP are mutually dependent on each other for proper localization (3), and in Drosophila cells and C.elegans embryos that lack INCENP or survivin, Aurora B cannot organize the kinetochores and the midbody (4,5). Phosphorylation on INCENP by CDK1 on Thr59 and Thr388 leads to the association of INCENP with Plk1, another important regulator of mitotic entry and exit (6). Interaction of INCENP with Plk1 is necessary for recruitment of Plk1 to the kinetochores, and the metaphase to anaphase transition (6). Interactions have also been reported between INCENP and heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1) (7) and β-tubulin (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and CO2 in the presence of NAD+. Acetyl-CoA then goes into the citric acid cycle where it reacts with oxaloacetate to form citrate. Acetyl-CoA is also used for fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. The reaction of oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate therefore serves as a critical link between glycolysis and the citric acid cycle and lipid metabolism. In mammalian cells, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is located in the mitochondrial matrix (1). This complex is comprised of three enzymes: pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1), dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (E2) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3). Pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) consists of two subunits: α and β. This enzyme catalyzes the removal of CO2 from pyruvate. Mutations in the α subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) lead to congenital defects that are usually associated with lactic acidosis, neurodegeneration and early death (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fas-associated death domain (FADD or Mort 1) functions as an important adaptor in coupling death signaling from membrane receptors, such as the Fas ligand and TNF family (DR3, DR4 and DR5), to caspase-8 (1,2). FADD has a carboxy-terminal death domain, which interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of the membrane receptor, and an amino-terminal death effector domain, which interacts with caspase-8. Clustering of the receptors upon stimulation brings about FADD and caspase-8 oligomerization, activating the caspase signaling pathway. Human FADD is phosphorylated mainly at Ser194, while mouse FADD is phosphorylated at Ser191. In both cases, the phosphorylation is cell cycle-dependent (3) and may be related to its regulatory role in embryonic development and cell cycle progression (4,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Fas-associated death domain (FADD or Mort 1) functions as an important adaptor in coupling death signaling from membrane receptors, such as the Fas ligand and TNF family (DR3, DR4 and DR5), to caspase-8 (1,2). FADD has a carboxy-terminal death domain, which interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of the membrane receptor, and an amino-terminal death effector domain, which interacts with caspase-8. Clustering of the receptors upon stimulation brings about FADD and caspase-8 oligomerization, activating the caspase signaling pathway. Human FADD is phosphorylated mainly at Ser194, while mouse FADD is phosphorylated at Ser191. In both cases, the phosphorylation is cell cycle-dependent (3) and may be related to its regulatory role in embryonic development and cell cycle progression (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PEA-15 is a 15 kDa phosphoprotein expressed abundantly in astrocytes and fibroblasts as well as in tissues, including the lung and eye (1). The protein has been shown to coordinate cell growth, death, and glucose utilization (2-4). The amino-terminal DED domain of PEA-15 mediates its binding to FADD or Erk and further regulates the Erk and apoptosis signaling pathways. PEA-15 can be phosphorylated at two serine residues, Ser104 and Ser116, located within the carboxy terminus. Phosphorylation at these sites regulates binding to Erk and FADD (2,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family members are negative regulators of cytokine signal transduction that inhibit the Jak/Stat pathway (1-3). The SOCS family consists of at least 8 members including the originally identified cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS1), as well as SOCS1-7. Each SOCS family member contains a central SH2 domain and a conserved carboxy-terminal motif designated as the SOCS box. These proteins are important regulators of cytokine signaling, proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SH2D1A and SH2D1B are small, adaptor proteins with a single SH2-domain that play important signal transduction roles mediated by the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family receptors (1). SH2D1A (also called SAP or SLAM-associated protein) is frequently mutated in patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (Duncan’s disease), which is characterized by extreme susceptibility to Epstein-Barr virus; approximately 50 different SH2D1A mutations have been reported to date (2-4). The single SH2D1B gene in humans (also called EAT-2 or Ewing's sarcoma's/FLI1-activated transcript 2) is present as a pair of duplicated EAT-2A and EAT-2B genes with identical genomic organization in mouse and rat (5,6).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PEA-15 is a 15 kDa phosphoprotein expressed abundantly in astrocytes and fibroblasts as well as in tissues, including the lung and eye (1). The protein has been shown to coordinate cell growth, death, and glucose utilization (2-4). The amino-terminal DED domain of PEA-15 mediates its binding to FADD or Erk and further regulates the Erk and apoptosis signaling pathways. PEA-15 can be phosphorylated at two serine residues, Ser104 and Ser116, located within the carboxy terminus. Phosphorylation at these sites regulates binding to Erk and FADD (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation, but it has also been associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegenerative diseases, infection, and cancer (3). Autophagy marker Light Chain 3 (LC3) was originally identified as a subunit of microtubule-associated proteins 1A and 1B (termed MAP1LC3) (4) and subsequently found to contain similarity to the yeast protein Apg8/Aut7/Cvt5 critical for autophagy (5). Three human LC3 isoforms (LC3A, LC3B, and LC3C) undergo post-translational modifications during autophagy (6-9). Cleavage of LC3 at the carboxy terminus immediately following synthesis yields the cytosolic LC3-I form. During autophagy, LC3-I is converted to LC3-II through lipidation by a ubiquitin-like system involving Atg7 and Atg3 that allows for LC3 to become associated with autophagic vesicles (6-10). The presence of LC3 in autophagosomes and the conversion of LC3 to the lower migrating form, LC3-II, have been used as indicators of autophagy (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bax is a key component for cellular induced apoptosis through mitochondrial stress (1). Upon apoptotic stimulation, Bax forms oligomers and translocates from the cytosol to the mitochondrial membrane (2). Through interactions with pore proteins on the mitochondrial membrane, Bax increases the membrane's permeability, which leads to the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, activation of caspase-9 and initiation of the caspase activation pathway for apoptosis (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Huntington's Disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by psychiatric, cognitive, and motor dysfunction. Neuropathology of HD involves specific neuronal subpopulations: GABA-ergic neurons of the striatum and neurons within the cerebral cortex selectively degenerate (1,2). The genetic analysis of HD has been the flagship study of inherited neurological diseases from initial chromosomal localization to identification of the gene.Huntingtin is a large (340-350 kD) cytosolic protein that may be involved in a number of cellular functions such as transcription, gastrulation, neurogenesis, neurotransmission, axonal transport, neural positioning, and apoptosis (2,3). The HD gene from unaffected individuals contains between 6 and 34 CAG trinucleotide repeats, with expansion beyond this range causing the onset of disease symptoms. A strong inverse correlation exists between the age of onset in patients and the number of huntingtin gene CAG repeats encoding a stretch of polyglutamine peptides (1,2). The huntingtin protein undergoes numerous post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, palmitoylation, and cleavage (2). Phosphorylation of Ser421 by Akt can partially counteract the toxicity that results from the expanded polyglutamine tract. Varying Akt expression in the brain correlates with regional differences in huntingtin protein phosphorylation; this pattern inversely correlates with the regions that are most affected by degeneration in diseased brain (2). A key step in the disease is the proteolytic cleavage of huntingtin protein into amino-terminal fragments that contain expanded glutamine repeats and translocate into the nucleus. Caspase mediated cleavage of huntingtin at Asp513 is associated with increased polyglutamine aggregate formation and toxicity. Phosphorylation of Ser434 by CDK5 protects against cleavage (2,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bax is a key component for cellular induced apoptosis through mitochondrial stress (1). Upon apoptotic stimulation, Bax forms oligomers and translocates from the cytosol to the mitochondrial membrane (2). Through interactions with pore proteins on the mitochondrial membrane, Bax increases the membrane's permeability, which leads to the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, activation of caspase-9 and initiation of the caspase activation pathway for apoptosis (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DYRK family includes several dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and regulated kinases capable of phosphorylating proteins at both Tyr and Ser/Thr residues (1). The DYRK family was identified based on homology to the yeast Yak1 (2) and the Drosophila minibrain (mnb) kinases (3). Seven mammalian isoforms have been discovered, including DYRK1A, DYRK1B, DYRK1C, DYRK2, DYRK3, DYRK4, and DYRK4B. Differences in substrate specificity, expression, and subcellular localization are seen across the DYRK family (4,5). All DYRK proteins have a Tyr-X-Tyr motif in the catalytic domain activation loop; phosphorylation of the second Tyr residue (e.g. Tyr312 of DYRK1A) is necessary for kinase activity. DYRKs typically autophosphorylate the Tyr residue within their activation loop, but phosphorylate substrates at Ser and Thr residues (1,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: SOD1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, is a major antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen (1). SOD1 is ubiquitously expressed and is localized in the cytosol, nucleus and mitochondrial intermembrane space. The SOD1 gene locus is on chromosome 21 in a region affected in Down Syndrome (2). In addition, over 100 distinct SOD1 inherited mutations have been identified in the familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive degenerative disease of motor neurons (3-5). Despite the fact that SOD1 helps to eliminate toxic reactive species, its mutations in ALS have been described as gain-of-function (5). The mechanism by which mutant SOD1 induces the neurodegeneration observed in ALS is still unclear. Mutant SOD1 proteins become misfolded and consequently oligomerize into high molecular weight species that aggregate and end up in proteinaceous inclusions (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ASF1 was first identified in S. cerevisiae based on its ability to de-repress transcriptional silencing when overexpressed (1). While only one gene exists in yeast and Drosophila, mammalian cells contain the two highly homologous ASF1A and ASF1B genes (2). ASF1A and ASF1B function as histone chaperones, delivering histone H3/H4 dimers to CAF-1 or HIRA histone deposition complexes to facilitate replication-coupled and replication-independent nucleosome assembly on DNA (2-5). Both ASF1A and ASF1B bind to CAF-1, but only ASF1A binds to HIRA (5). In addition to playing a role in DNA replication and gene silencing, ASF1 functions in DNA damage repair, genome stability and cellular senescence. Deletion of ASF1 in yeast and Drosophila confers sensitivity to various DNA damaging agents and inhibitors of DNA replication, increases genomic instability and sister chromatid exchange, and activates the DNA damage checkpoint (6-8). Depletion of both ASF1A and ASF1B in mammalian cells results in the accumulation of cells in S phase, increased phosphorylation of H2A.X, centrosome amplification and apoptosis (9,10). ASF1A is required for the formation of senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (SAHF), with overexpression of ASF1A inducing senescence in primary cells (4). Both ASF1A and ASF1B are phosphorylated in S phase by the Tousled-like kinases TLK1 and TLK2, and are dephosphorylated when TLK1 and TLK2 are inactivated by Chk1 kinase in response to replicative stress (11,12). The function of ASF1 phosphorylation is not yet understood.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glucose homeostasis is regulated by hormones and cellular energy status. Elevations of blood glucose during feeding stimulate insulin release from pancreatic β-cells through a glucose sensing pathway. Feeding also stimulates release of gut hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which further induces insulin release, inhibits glucagon release and promotes β-cell viability. CREB-dependent transcription likely plays a role in both glucose sensing and GLP-1 signaling (1). The protein CRTC2 (CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 2)/TORC2 (transducer of regulated CREB activity 2) functions as a CREB co-activator (2,3) and is implicated in mediating the effects of these two pathways (4). In quiescent cells, CRTC2/TORC2 is phosphorylated at Ser171 and becomes sequestered in the cytoplasm via an interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. Glucose and gut hormones lead to the dephosphorylation of CRTC2/TORC2 and its dissociation from 14-3-3 proteins. Dephosphorylated CRTC2/TORC2 enters the nucleus to promote CREB-dependent transcription. CRTC2/TORC2 plays a key role in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenic gene transcription in response to hormonal and energy signals during fasting (5).CRTC2/TORC2-related proteins CRTC1/TORC1 and CRTC3/TORC3 also act as CREB co-activators (2,3). CRTC1/TORC1, CRTC2/TORC2 and CRTC3/TORC3 associate with the HTLV Tax protein to promote Tax-dependent transcription of HTLV-1 long terminal repeats (6,7). CRTC1/TORC1 is highly phosphorylated at Ser151 in mouse hypothalamic cells under basal conditions (8). When these cells are exposed to cAMP or a calcium activator, CRTC1/TORC1 is dephosphorylated and translocates into the nucleus (8). CRTC1/TORC1 is essential for energy balance and fertility (8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis of human cells. The unconjugated antibody #2764 reacts with human, mouse, rat and monkey Bcl-xL protein. CST expects that Bcl-xL (54H6) Rabbit mAb (Alexa Fluor® 488 Conjugate) will also recognize Bcl-xL in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Bcl-xL prevents apoptosis through two different mechanisms: heterodimerization with an apoptotic protein inhibits its apoptotic effect (1,2) and formation of mitochondrial outer membrane pores help maintain a normal membrane state under stressful conditions (3). Bcl-xL is phosphorylated by JNK following treatment with microtubule-damaging agents such as paclitaxel, vinblastine and nocodazole (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein kinase R (PKR) is transcriptionally induced by interferon and activated by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). PKR inhibits translation initiation through phosphorylation of the α subunit of the initiation factor eIF2 (eIF2α) and also controls the activation of several transcription factors, such as NF-κB, p53, and the Stats. In addition, PKR mediates apoptosis induced by many different stimuli, such as LPS, TNF-α, viral infection, and serum starvation (1,2). Activation of PKR by dsRNA results in PKR dimerization and autophosphorylation of Thr446 and Thr451 in the activation loop. Substitution of threonine for alanine at position 451 completely inactivated PKR, while a mutant with a threonine to alanine substitution at position 446 was partially active (3). Research studies have implicated PKR activation in the pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ribosomal protein L13a (RPL13a, 60S ribosomal protein L13a) is a member of the L13 ribosomal protein family and a structural component of the 60S ribosomal subunit (1). RPL13a appears to play an important role in transcript-specific translational silencing. Interferon-γ induces the phosphorylation of RPL13a and triggers the release of this protein from the 60S ribosomal subunit (2). Free RPL13a protein binds to the GAIT (interferon-γ-activated inhibitor of translation) complex at the 3'-UTR of ceruloplasmin (Cp) mRNA to repress Cp expression (2). RPL13a bound to the GAIT complex interacts with eIF4G, which prevents the recruitment of 43S ribosomal subunit and results in transcript-specific translation suppression (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bcl-xL prevents apoptosis through two different mechanisms: heterodimerization with an apoptotic protein inhibits its apoptotic effect (1,2) and formation of mitochondrial outer membrane pores help maintain a normal membrane state under stressful conditions (3). Bcl-xL is phosphorylated by JNK following treatment with microtubule-damaging agents such as paclitaxel, vinblastine and nocodazole (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mesoderm development candidate genes 1 (MESDC1) and 2 (MESDC2) were identified from the mesoderm development (MESD) deletion interval located on mouse chromosome 7 (1). MESD acts as a chaperone for low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) proteins in the ER, and particularly associates with Wnt signaling pathway coreceptors LRP5 and LPR6 (2). MESD is required for proper LRP5/6 folding and maturation to the cell surface, which plays a major role in Wnt signaling (3-5). The interaction between MESD and LRP5 is disrupted by a G171V mutation in LRP5 that is found in individuals with a familial phenotype characterized by high bone mass (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bcl-xL prevents apoptosis through two different mechanisms: heterodimerization with an apoptotic protein inhibits its apoptotic effect (1,2) and formation of mitochondrial outer membrane pores help maintain a normal membrane state under stressful conditions (3). Bcl-xL is phosphorylated by JNK following treatment with microtubule-damaging agents such as paclitaxel, vinblastine and nocodazole (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Numb contains an amino-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain and carboxy-terminal endocytic binding motifs for α-adaptin and EH (Eps15 homology) domain-containing proteins, indicating a role in endocytosis (1,2). There are four mammalian Numb splicing isoforms that are differentially expressed and may have distinct functions (3-5). Numb acts as a negative regulator of Notch signaling by promoting ubiquitination and degradation of Notch (6). The protein is asymmetrically segregated into one daughter cell during cell division, producing two daughter cells with different responses to Notch signaling and different cell fates (7,8). The localization of Numb can also be regulated by G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and PKC signaling (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Glucose homeostasis is regulated by a variety of hormones including glucagon. Glucagon is synthesized as the precursor molecule proglucagon and is proteolytically processed to yield the mature peptide in α cells of the pancreatic islets. Glucagon causes the release of glucose from glycogen and stimulates gluconeogenesis in the liver (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CUL3 (Cullin-3) is a member of the cullin-based ubiquitin ligase family. By interacting with Hrt1 and BTB domain containing proteins, the complex functions as a CUL3-based E3 ligase to bring specific substrates to ubiquitinylation and degradation (1). The CUL3 complex has been shown to target many substrates involved in cell cycle progression (2), transcription (3), development and differentiation (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interferon-stimulated 15 kDa protein (ISG15), also known as ubiquitin cross-reactive protein (UCRP), is a member of the ubiquitin-like protein family and functions in various biological pathways from pregnancy to innate immune responses (1). Expression of ISG15 is stimulated by cellular exposure to type 1 interferons α and β, in addition to infection with viruses such as influenza B (2,3). After exposure to type I interferons, both lymphocytes and monocytes, in addition to some fibroblasts and epithelial cells, release ISG15 into culture medium (1,4). ISG15 has been shown to function as a cytokine, stimulating interferon γ secretion by monocytes and macrophages, proliferation of natural killer cells, and chemotactic responses in neutrophils (4,5). ISG15 has also been shown to function intracellularly, being covalently conjugated to other proteins by E1 (Ube1L), E2 (UbcH8) and E3 ligases via a multi-step process analogous to ubiquitination (6,7). ISG15 is removed from proteins by the ubiquitin processing protease Ubp43 (8). ISG15-protein conjugation (ISGylation) is induced by type 1 interferons, and target proteins include the serine protease inhibitor Serpin 2A, PLCγ1, ERK1/2, Jak1 and Stat1 (9,10). Unlike ubiquitination, ISGylation does not target proteins for degradation, rather ISGylation increases Jak1 and Stat1 activity, enhancing the cellular response to interferons (11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Numb contains an amino-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain and carboxy-terminal endocytic binding motifs for α-adaptin and EH (Eps15 homology) domain-containing proteins, indicating a role in endocytosis (1,2). There are four mammalian Numb splicing isoforms that are differentially expressed and may have distinct functions (3-5). Numb acts as a negative regulator of Notch signaling by promoting ubiquitination and degradation of Notch (6). The protein is asymmetrically segregated into one daughter cell during cell division, producing two daughter cells with different responses to Notch signaling and different cell fates (7,8). The localization of Numb can also be regulated by G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and PKC signaling (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fgr is a member of the Src tyrosine kinase family. It has a membrane-associated amino-terminal domain that is highly divergent from other family members, internal conserved SH2 and SH3 domains and a highly conserved carboxy-terminal tyrosine kinase catalytic domain (1,2). Tyrosine 412 is located in the activation loop, and phosphorylation of this residue is critical for the activation of Fgr tyrosine kinase activity. c-Fgr is predominantly expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin including differentiated myeloid cells, NK and B cells (3,4). Fgr plays an important role in the signaling cascade from membrane receptors lacking intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity such as Bcr, FcR, and the integrin family of receptors (5). It was demonstrated that Fgr functions as a selective inhibitor of beta2 integrin-mediated signaling and Syk kinase function in monocytes (5).