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Product listing: Phospho-FGF Receptor 1 (Tyr766) Antibody, UniProt ID P11362 #84309 to IDH2 (KrMab-3) Mouse mAb, UniProt ID P48735 #60322

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produce mitogenic and angiogenic effects in target cells by signaling through cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. There are four members of the FGF receptor family: FGFR1 (flg), FGFR2 (bek, KGFR), FGFR3, and FGFR4. Each receptor contains an extracellular ligand binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic kinase domain (1). Following ligand binding and dimerization, the receptors are phosphorylated at specific tyrosine residues (2). Seven tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of FGFR1 can be phosphorylated: Tyr463, 583, 585, 653, 654, 730, and 766. Tyr653 and Tyr654 are important for catalytic activity of activated FGFR and are essential for signaling (3). The other phosphorylated tyrosine residues may provide docking sites for downstream signaling components such as Crk and PLCγ (4,5).

$165
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to allophycocyanin (APC) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Adenosine deaminase (ADA) catalyzes adenosine degradation (1). Lack of this enzyme leads to the accumulation of toxic metabolites causing severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), an autosomal recessive disorder. Differentiation and function of T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells are impaired in ADA-SCID patients leading to recurrent infections (1,2). Gene therapies for ADA-SCID were reported to correct the metabolic defect and restore the deficient immune function (1-3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Aquaporins (AQP) are integral membrane proteins that serve as channels in the transfer of water and small solutes across the membrane. There are 13 isoforms of AQP that express in different types of cells and tissues (1,2). AQP1 is found in blood vessels, kidney, eye, and ear. AQP2 is found in the kidney, and it has been shown that the lack of AQP2 results in diabetes (1,3). AQP4 is present in the brain, where it is enriched in astrocytes (1,2,4). AQP5 is found in the salivary and lacrimal gland, AQP6 in intracellular vesicles in the kidney, AQP7 in adipocytes, AQP8 in kidney, testis, and liver, AQP9 is present in liver and leukocytes and AQP10-11 in the intestine (1,3,4). AQPs are essential for the function of cells and organs. It has been shown that AQP1 and AQP4 regulate the water homeostasis in astrocytes, preventing cerebral edema caused by solute imbalance (5). Several studies have shown the involvement of AQPs in the development of inflammatory processes, including cells of innate and adaptive immunity (6,7).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in mouse tissue. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Tau (Thr205) (E7D3E) Rabbit mAb #49561.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Tau is a heterogeneous microtubule-associated protein that promotes and stabilizes microtubule assembly, especially in axons. Six isoforms with different amino-terminal inserts and different numbers of tandem repeats near the carboxy terminus have been identified, and tau is hyperphosphorylated at approximately 25 sites by Erk, GSK-3, and CDK5 (1,2). Phosphorylation decreases the ability of tau to bind to microtubules. Neurofibrillary tangles are a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; these tangles are bundles of paired helical filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. In particular, phosphorylation at Ser396 by GSK-3 or CDK5 destabilizes microtubules. Furthermore, research studies have shown that inclusions of tau are found in a number of other neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as tauopathies (1,3).

$239
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PerCP-Cy5.5® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in mouse tissue. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-Tau (Thr205) (E7D3E) Rabbit mAb #49561.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Tau is a heterogeneous microtubule-associated protein that promotes and stabilizes microtubule assembly, especially in axons. Six isoforms with different amino-terminal inserts and different numbers of tandem repeats near the carboxy terminus have been identified, and tau is hyperphosphorylated at approximately 25 sites by Erk, GSK-3, and CDK5 (1,2). Phosphorylation decreases the ability of tau to bind to microtubules. Neurofibrillary tangles are a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; these tangles are bundles of paired helical filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. In particular, phosphorylation at Ser396 by GSK-3 or CDK5 destabilizes microtubules. Furthermore, research studies have shown that inclusions of tau are found in a number of other neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as tauopathies (1,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: L-arginine plays a critical role in regulating the immune system (1-3). In inflammation, cancer and certain other pathological conditions, myeloid cell differentiation is inhibited leading to a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are recruited to sites of cancer-associated inflammation and express high levels of arginase-1 (4). Arginase-1 catalyzes the final step of the urea cycle converting L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea (5). Thus MDSCs increase the catabolism of L-arginine resulting in L-arginine depletion in the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer (4,6). The reduced availability of L-arginine suppresses T-cell proliferation and function and thus contributes to tumor progression (4,6). Arginase-1 is of great interest to researchers looking for a therapeutic target to inhibit the function of MDSCs in the context of cancer immunotherapy (7). In addition, research studies have demonstrated that Arginase-1 distinguishes primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from metastatic tumors in the liver, indicating its value as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of HCC (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methyltransferase-like protein 3 (METTL3) and methytransferase-like protein 14 (METTL14) are the two catalytic subunits of an N6-methyltransferase complex that methylates adenosine residues in RNA (1). Methylation of adenosine residues regulates mRNA splicing, processing, translation efficiency, editing and stability, in addition to regulating primary miRNA processing, and is critical for proper regulation of the circadian clock, embryonic stem cell self-renewal, immune tolerance, response to various stimuli, meiosis and mouse fertility (2,3). In this complex, METTL3 functions as the catalytic methyltransferase subunit and METTL14 functions as the target recognition subunit by binding to RNA (4). In addition, the Wilms tumor 1-associated protein (WTAP) functions as a regulatory subunit and is required for accumulation of the complex to nuclear speckles, which are sites of RNA processing (5). Several studies suggest a role for this complex in cancer. METTL3 expression is elevated in lung adenocarcinoma where it promotes growth, survival and invasion of human lung cancer cells (6). In addition, WTAP is over-expressed in a number of different cancers and positively regulates cell migration and invasion in glioblastoma and cholangiocarcinoma (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Following protein synthesis, secretory, intra-organellar, and transmembrane proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. The accumulation of unfolded proteins within the ER triggers an adaptive mechanism known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) that counteracts compromised protein folding (1). The transmembrane serine/threonine kinase IRE1, originally identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a proximal sensor for the UPR that transmits the unfolded protein signal across the ER membrane (2-4). The human homolog IRE1α was later identified and is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues (5). Upon activation of the unfolded protein response, IRE1α splices X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) mRNA through an unconventional mechanism using its endoribonuclease activity (6). This reaction converts XBP-1 from an unspliced XBP-1u isoform to the spliced XBP-1s isoform, which is a potent transcriptional activator that induces expression of many UPR responsive genes (6).

$209
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to PE-Cy7® and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Evi-1 (C50E12) Rabbit mAb #2593.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Evi-1 (Ecotropic virus integration site 1) was originally identified as a common site of viral integration in murine myeloid leukemia. It is involved in human myeloid disorders through chromosome translocation and inversion (1) and is also implicated in solid tumor formation (2). Evi-1 is a zinc finger transcription factor which also plays an important role in animal development (3). It has many isoforms due to alternative usage of 5'-ends (4), alternative splicing (5), and intergenic splicing which results in the formation of a fusion protein with MDS1 in normal tissues (6).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Granzymes are a family of serine proteases expressed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells and are key components of immune responses to pathogens and transformed cells (1). Granzymes are synthesized as zymogens and are processed into mature enzymes by cleavage of a leader sequence. They are released by exocytosis in lysosome-like granules containing perforin, a membrane pore-forming protein. Granzyme B has the strongest apoptotic activity of all the granzymes as a result of its caspase-like ability to cleave substrates at aspartic acid residues thereby activating procaspases directly and cleaving downstream caspase substrates (2,3).

$69
100 µg
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in mouse cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: LACTB is a serine beta-lactamase-like protein that is most prominently expressed in skeletal muscle, heart and liver (1). It contains an amino-terminal transmembrane domain and is localized to the mitochondrial intermembrane space, where it is polymerized into stable filaments that promote intramitochondrial membrane organization and micro-compartmentalization (2). Studies in multiple breast cancer cell types have shown that LACTB can function as a tumor suppressor by promoting decreased levels of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (PISD), leading to reduced cell proliferation (3). In accordance with this, levels of LACTB have been shown to be downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma and colorectal cancer and associated with poor prognosis in both (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-1, or interleukin-1ß converting enzyme (ICE/ICEα), is a class I cysteine protease, which also includes caspases -4, -5, -11, and -12. Caspase-1 cleaves inflammatory cytokines such as pro-IL-1ß and interferon-γ inducing factor (IL-18) into their mature forms (1,2). Like other caspases, caspase-1 is proteolytically activated from a proenzyme to produce a tetramer of its two active subunits, p20 and p10. Caspase-1 has a large amino-terminal pro-domain that contains a caspase recruitment domain (CARD). Overexpression of caspase-1 can induce apoptosis (3). Mice deficient in caspase-1, however, have no overt defects in apoptosis but do have defects in the maturation of pro-IL-1β and are resistant to endotoxic shock (4,5). At least six caspase-1 isoforms have been identified, including caspase-1 α, β, γ, δ, ε and ζ (6). Most caspase-1 isoforms (α, β, γ and δ) produce products between 30-48 kDa and induce apoptosis upon over-expression. Caspase-1 ε typically contains only the p10 subunit, does not induce apoptosis and may act as a dominant negative. The widely expressed ζ isoform of caspase-1 induces apoptosis and lacks 39 amino-terminal residues found in the α isoform (6). Activation of caspase-1 occurs through an oligomerization molecular platform designated the "inflammasome" that includes caspase-5, Pycard/Asc, and NALP1 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: B-lymphocyte antigen CD20 (also known as MS4A1; Membrane-spanning 4-domains subfamily A member 1) is a cell surface phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of B cell activation and proliferation (1,2). It is commonly used as a marker to identify B cells and is expressed throughout B cell development, up until their differentiation into plasma cells. CD20 has no known ligand, and its expression and function are largely conserved between human and mouse (1-3). Evidence suggests that CD20 is necessary for store operated calcium (SOC) entry, which leads to elevated cytoplasmic calcium levels required for B cell activation (4-5). Anti-CD20 antibody immunotherapy depletes B cells by activation of the innate monocytic network and is a common treatment for B cell lymphomas, leukemias, and autoimmune diseases (6).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in mouse tissue. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated NeuN (D4G4O) XP® Rabbit mAb #24307.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Neuronal nuclei (NeuN, Fox-3, RBFOX3) is a nuclear protein expressed in most post-mitotic neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. NeuN is not detected in Purkinje cells, sympathetic ganglion cells, Cajal-Retzius cells, INL retinal cells, inferior olivary, or dentate nucleus neurons (1). This neuronal protein was originally identified by immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody also called NeuN. Using MS-analysis, NeuN was later identified as the Fox-3 gene product. Fox-3 contains an RNA recognition motif and functions as a splicing regulator (2). Fox-3 regulates alternative splicing of NumB, promoting neuronal differentiation during development (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-1, or interleukin-1ß converting enzyme (ICE/ICEα), is a class I cysteine protease, which also includes caspases -4, -5, -11, and -12. Caspase-1 cleaves inflammatory cytokines such as pro-IL-1ß and interferon-γ inducing factor (IL-18) into their mature forms (1,2). Like other caspases, caspase-1 is proteolytically activated from a proenzyme to produce a tetramer of its two active subunits, p20 and p10. Caspase-1 has a large amino-terminal pro-domain that contains a caspase recruitment domain (CARD). Overexpression of caspase-1 can induce apoptosis (3). Mice deficient in caspase-1, however, have no overt defects in apoptosis but do have defects in the maturation of pro-IL-1β and are resistant to endotoxic shock (4,5). At least six caspase-1 isoforms have been identified, including caspase-1 α, β, γ, δ, ε and ζ (6). Most caspase-1 isoforms (α, β, γ and δ) produce products between 30-48 kDa and induce apoptosis upon over-expression. Caspase-1 ε typically contains only the p10 subunit, does not induce apoptosis and may act as a dominant negative. The widely expressed ζ isoform of caspase-1 induces apoptosis and lacks 39 amino-terminal residues found in the α isoform (6). Activation of caspase-1 occurs through an oligomerization molecular platform designated the "inflammasome" that includes caspase-5, Pycard/Asc, and NALP1 (7).

$499
96 assays
1 Kit
The FastScan™ Total Vimentin ELISA Kit is a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of Vimentin. To perform the assay, sample is incubated with a capture antibody conjugated with a proprietary tag and a second detection antibody linked to HRP, forming a sandwich with Vimentin in solution. This entire complex is immobilized to the plate via an anti-tag antibody. The wells are then washed to remove unbound material. TMB is then added. The magnitude of observed signal is proportional to the quantity of Vimentin. Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is an abundant RNA modification that plays an important role in mRNA splicing, processing, and stability. The m6A modification is specifically recognized by members of the YT521B homology (YTH) domain-containing family (YTHDF), consisting of YTHDF1, YTHDF2, and YTHDF3. All three members of the YTHDF family are primarily cytosolic proteins that share similar sequence and domain structure, including a conserved C-terminal YTH domain that specifically interacts with m6A (1). Despite these similarities, recent studies suggest that YTHDF proteins are involved in distinct regulatory functions with minimal overlap. Specifically, YTHDF1 binding has been reported to promote enhanced mRNA translation, but has no measurable effect on mRNA stability (2). Conversely, YTHDF2 binding appears to promote mRNA degradation, but has minimal effect on translation efficiency (3). The function of YTHDF3 is less clear, but it has been proposed to function as an auxiliary protein for both YTHDF1 and YTHDF2, helping to promote either increased mRNA translation or decay, respectively (4). Additional studies offer a different viewpoint, suggesting that all three YTHDF proteins initiate mRNA degradation (5), or mediate increased mRNA stability and protein expression (6), promoting the idea that these proteins may carry out similar rather than distinct functions.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The transcription factor ATF-2 (also called CRE-BP1) binds to both AP-1 and CRE DNA response elements and is a member of the ATF/CREB family of leucine zipper proteins (1). ATF-2 interacts with a variety of viral oncoproteins and cellular tumor suppressors and is a target of the SAPK/JNK and p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways (2-4). Various forms of cellular stress, including genotoxic agents, inflammatory cytokines, and UV irradiation, stimulate the transcriptional activity of ATF-2. Cellular stress activates ATF-2 by phosphorylation of Thr69 and Thr71 (2-4). Both SAPK and p38 MAPK have been shown to phosphorylate ATF-2 at these sites in vitro and in cells transfected with ATF-2. Mutations of these sites result in the loss of stress-induced transcription by ATF-2 (2-4). In addition, mutations at these sites reduce the ability of E1A and Rb to stimulate gene expression via ATF-2 (2).

$260
100 µl
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Androgen receptor (AR), a zinc finger transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, is activated by phosphorylation and dimerization upon ligand binding (1). This promotes nuclear localization and binding of AR to androgen response elements in androgen target genes. Research studies have shown that AR plays a crucial role in several stages of male development and the progression of prostate cancer (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-2 inducible T-cell kinase (Itk, Emt or Tsk) is a member of the non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases. Family members of Itk include Tec, Btk, Rlk and Bmx and are all defined by a common structure: an amino-terminal PH domain, a Tec-homology domain and a SH3 and SH2 domain followed by a carboxy-terminal kinase domain (1). Tec, Rlk and Itk are expressed in T cells and activated in response to T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. Data demonstrate that Itk functions in signal transduction downstream of TCR and activates PLCgamma1 and Erk. Lck directly activates Itk through phosphorylation in the conserved activation loop at Tyr511, and furthermore, Itk is autophosphorylated in the SH3 domain at Tyr180. Itk-Y180F is still capable of phosphorylating PLCgamma1 in contrast to Itk-Y511F, which has lost that function (2-3). Itk -/- mice show reduced lung inflammation, eosinophil infiltration and mucous production in response to allergic asthma induction. Thus, Itk could become a desirable target for anti-asthmatic treatments (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor (VEGFR-1, Flt-1) is a 180 kDa receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the VEGFR (Flt) family (1-3). The receptor is comprised of seven extracellular Ig-like domains, a single transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail containing the active kinase domain (1,2). VEGFR-1 plays an important role in endothelial cell function and normal vascular development, as well as in hematopoietic function (2,3). VEGF-A is a high affinity ligand of VEGFR-1. VEGFR-1 also binds VEGF-B and PLGF (2). Ligand binding results in very little VEGFR-1 kinase activation, and VEGFR-1/VEGF-A binding negatively regulates VEGF function by diverting the growth factor from other functional VEGF receptors (3).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescent analysis in mouse tissue. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated NeuN (D4G4O) XP® Rabbit mAb #24307.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Neuronal nuclei (NeuN, Fox-3, RBFOX3) is a nuclear protein expressed in most post-mitotic neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. NeuN is not detected in Purkinje cells, sympathetic ganglion cells, Cajal-Retzius cells, INL retinal cells, inferior olivary, or dentate nucleus neurons (1). This neuronal protein was originally identified by immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody also called NeuN. Using MS-analysis, NeuN was later identified as the Fox-3 gene product. Fox-3 contains an RNA recognition motif and functions as a splicing regulator (2). Fox-3 regulates alternative splicing of NumB, promoting neuronal differentiation during development (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase F (PTPRF, LAR) is a transmembrane PTP that helps to regulate insulin signaling, cell proliferation and cell migration. The PTPRF protein is composed of an extracellular segment that contains several Ig-like and fibronectin (Fn-III) domains, a transmembrane region and a pair of cytoplasmic phosphatase domains (1,2). Functional studies reveal that the membrane-associated D1 phosphatase domain is responsible for substrate dephosphorylation, while the D2 domain is important for substrate specificity (3). PTPRF negatively regulates insulin signaling through dephosphorylation of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate (4). This phosphatase activates the pro-apoptotic DAPK serine/threonine kinase by removing a phosphate at Tyr491/492, while the kinase Src replaces the phosphate to inactivate DAPK at the same time it down regulates PTPRF expression (5). PTPRF is commonly found at focal adhesions where it interacts with liprin, which localizes the phosphatase to the membrane, and the Rac/Rho family GTPase Trio (6). Localization of PTPRF at adherens junctions results in PTPRF modification of β-catenin, which inhibits cell migration by limiting the amount of available cytosolic β-catenin (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 8 (CEACAM8), also known as CD66b, is a member of the CEA-related cell-adhesion molecule (CEACAM) family (1). CEACAMs bind to themselves and other family members to carry out numerous cellular functions, including proliferation, signaling, differentiation, tumor suppression, and survival (2). CEACAM8 is a single-chain, glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored, highly glycosylated protein that under normal conditions is expressed almost exclusively on granulocytes (3). Heterophilic interactions of CEACAM8 with other surface molecules, such as CEACAM6, have been shown to be involved in regulating cell adhesion in a calcium-independent manner (4). As such, CEACAM8 has demonstrated utility as a marker of neutrophil and eosinophil activation (5,6) and in pathological conditions is shown to be highly expressed in primary myelofibrosis and acute lymphoblastic leukemias (7,8). Assessment of CEACAM8 positive tumor-infiltrating neutrophils has demonstrated value as a prognostic factor in multiple cancer types (9,10).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: IDH2 is one of three isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDH1-3) that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to produce CO2 and α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). These enzymes belong to two distinct subclasses that utilize either NAD or NADP+ as an electron acceptor. IDH2 is an NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase expressed primarily in the mitochondria, where it also functions in the TCA cycle (1,2). Mutations in IDH2 or its cytoplasmic counterpart (IDH1) have been reported in glioblastoma multiforme (3), acute myeloid leukemia (4,5), and other malignancies (6). Research studies have shown that gain-of-function mutations in IDH2 can lead to the accumulation and secretion of the oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) in cancer cells (6,7).