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Product listing: PLZF (D8G3G) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q05516 #39784 to AsCpf1 (Strain BV3L6) Antibody #38150

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PLZF (promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger), is a transcriptional repressor and an epigenetic regulator. It belongs to a large family of BTB-POZ domain containing transcriptional repressors (1). It was first discovered as a fusion partner of RAR (Retinoic Acid Receptor) in the chromosomal translocation t(11; 17) in a case of in acute promyelocytic leukemia (2). PLZF is thought to regulate hematopoietic stem cell quiescence (3,4), maintain spermatogenesis (5), and direct differentiation of distinct populations of natural killer cells (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) is a ubiquitin binding protein involved in cell signaling, oxidative stress, and autophagy (1-4). It was first identified as a protein that binds to the SH2 domain of p56Lck (5) and independently found to interact with PKCζ (6,7). SQSTM1 was subsequently found to interact with ubiquitin, providing a scaffold for several signaling proteins and triggering degradation of proteins through the proteasome or lysosome (8). Interaction between SQSTM1 and TRAF6 leads to the K63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and subsequent activation of the NF-κB pathway (9). Protein aggregates formed by SQSTM1 can be degraded by the autophagosome (4,10,11). SQSTM1 binds autophagosomal membrane protein LC3/Atg8, bringing SQSTM1-containing protein aggregates to the autophagosome (12). Lysosomal degradation of autophagosomes leads to a decrease in SQSTM1 levels during autophagy; conversely, autophagy inhibitors stabilize SQSTM1 levels. Studies have demonstrated a link between SQSTM1 and oxidative stress. SQSTM1 interacts with KEAP1, which is a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NRF2, a key transcription factor involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress (3). Thus, accumulation of SQSTM1 can lead to an increase in NRF2 activity.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). In addition to p53, mammalian cells contain two p53 family members, p63 and p73, which are similar to p53 in both structure and function (2). While p63 can induce p53-responsive genes and apoptosis, mutation of p63 rarely results in tumors (2). Research investigators frequently observe amplification of the p63 gene in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, head and neck (2,3). The p63 gene contains an alternative transcription initiation site that yields a truncated ΔNp63 lacking the transactivation domain, and alternative splicing at the carboxy-terminus yields the α, β, and γ isoforms (3,4).

$108
250 PCR reactions
500 µl
SimpleChIP® Mouse CXCL2 Promoter Primers contain a mix of forward and reverse PCR primers that are specific to a region of the mouse C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CXCL2) promoter. These primers can be used to amplify DNA that has been isolated using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Primers have been optimized for use in SYBR® Green quantitative real-time PCR and have been tested in conjunction with SimpleChIP® Enzymatic Chromatin IP Kits #9002 and #9003 and ChIP-validated antibodies from Cell Signaling Technology®.
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Background: The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful and versatile technique used for probing protein-DNA interactions within the natural chromatin context of the cell (1,2). This assay can be used to either identify multiple proteins associated with a specific region of the genome or to identify the many regions of the genome bound by a particular protein (3-6). ChIP can be used to determine the specific order of recruitment of various proteins to a gene promoter or to "measure" the relative amount of a particular histone modification across an entire gene locus (3,4). In addition to histone proteins, the ChIP assay can be used to analyze binding of transcription factors and co-factors, DNA replication factors, and DNA repair proteins. When performing the ChIP assay, cells are first fixed with formaldehyde, a reversible protein-DNA cross-linking agent that "preserves" the protein-DNA interactions occurring in the cell (1,2). Cells are lysed and chromatin is harvested and fragmented using either sonication or enzymatic digestion. Fragmented chromatin is then immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific to a particular protein or histone modification. Any DNA sequences that are associated with the protein or histone modification of interest will co-precipitate as part of the cross-linked chromatin complex and the relative amount of that DNA sequence will be enriched by the immunoselection process. After immunoprecipitation, the protein-DNA cross-links are reversed and the DNA is purified. Standard PCR or quantitative real-time PCR are often used to measure the amount of enrichment of a particular DNA sequence by a protein-specific immunoprecipitation (1,2). Alternatively, the ChIP assay can be combined with genomic tiling micro-array (ChIP on chip) techniques, high throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq), or cloning strategies, all of which allow for genome-wide analysis of protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications (5-8). SimpleChIP® primers have been optimized for amplification of ChIP-isolated DNA using real-time quantitative PCR and provide important positive and negative controls that can be used to confirm a successful ChIP experiment.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neogenin is a member of the Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) receptor family. It acts as an attractive axon guidance receptor in response to netrin, and as a repellent receptor when interacting with RGMa (1,2). Neogenin also regulates adhesion and tissue organization, such as bone formation, mammary gland morphogenesis, and skeletal myofiber development, by interacting with secreted netrins (3-5). In addition, neogenin is a key regulator of adult neurogenesis by synchronizing neuroblast migration and differentiation (6). Neogenin expression has been found to be associated with cellular phenotype in cancer. In breast cancer, neogenin expression is inversely correlated with cancer grade (7), while in gastric cancer, up regulation of neogenin was found to increase cell proliferation and motility (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Abi1, Abi2 and Abi3 are members of the Abl1 interactor family, which function as adaptor signaling molecules down stream of the receptor tyrosine kinase Ab1 (1-3). In addition to Abl, Abi1 has been shown to interact with the important signaling transducers WAVE and p85PI3K to regulate cytoskeletal and growth signaling (4,5). Along its sequences, Abi1 has multiple modules for carrying on these interactions. It has a WAVE binding domain, which allows it to interact with WAVE, a homeo-domain/PEST domain, which, when phosphorylated can acts as a docking site for SH2 binding, a PXXP sequence to interact with the SH3 domain of Abl, and a C-terminal SH3 domain for interaction with the proline rich region of Ab1 (4,5). Abl can phosphorylate Abi1 on Y213 (6), the phosphorylated sequence serves as a docking site for both the SH2 domain of Abl and the SH2 domain of p85PI3K (7). Another important phosphorylation site for Abi1 is Y435. Phosphorylation of Abi1 at Y435 promotes tumor cell adhesion and invasion (8).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
PathScan® Total Tyro3 Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of Tyro3 protein. A Tyro3 Rabbit mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, Tyro3 protein (phospho and nonphospho) is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a Tyro3 Mouse Detection mAb is added to detect the captured Tyro3 proteins. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of optical density for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of total tyro3 protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Tyro3 is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the TAM subfamily (Tyro3, Axl and Mer). All three members have similar domain structure composed of an extracellular region with 2 Ig-like domains, followed by 2 FNII-like domains, a single transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain (1). The natural ligand for Tyro3, as well as Axl and Mer, is Gas6 (growth arrest-specific gene 6) (1,2). Expression pattern and target knockout data indicate an important role of Tyro3 in apoptotic cell phagocytosis of dendritic cells and macrophages (3), NK cell differentiation (4), reproductive neuron survival and migration (5), osteoclast stimulation (6,7), as well as cortical and hippocampal neuron function (8). Both MAPK and PI3K pathways have been suggested as downstream targets of Tyro3 activation (7,8). Tyro3 has also been shown to be correlated to melanoma tumorigenesis, likely through its reglulatory role in the expression of oncogenic microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Hemoglobin (Hb, Hgb) is a heme-containing transport protein found primarily in the red blood cells of humans and most other vertebrates. The primary function of hemoglobin is to transport oxygen from the external environment to the body tissues. Hemoglobin also facilitates metabolic waste removal by assisting in the transport of carbon dioxide from tissues back to the respiratory organs (1). Mature hemoglobin is a tetrameric protein complex, with each subunit containing an oxygen-binding heme group (2). Multiple isoforms of hemoglobin exist, which vary in relative abundance depending on developmental stage. Adult hemoglobin (HbA) is comprised of two α subunits and two β subunits and is the predominant hemoglobin found in red blood cells of children and adults. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) contains two α subunits and two γ subunits and is the predominant isoform found during fetal and early postnatal development (2,3). Mutations that alter the structure or abundance of specific globin subunits can result in pathological conditions known as hemoglobinopathies (4). One such disorder is sickle cell disease, which is characterized by structural abnormalities that limit the oxygen carrying capacity of red blood cells. By contrast, thalassemia disorders are characterized by deficiencies in the abundance of specific hemoglobin subunits (4). Clinical treatments that are designed to alter the expression of specific hemoglobin subunits can be used to treat hemoglobinopathies (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tau is a heterogeneous microtubule-associated protein that promotes and stabilizes microtubule assembly, especially in axons. Six isoforms with different amino-terminal inserts and different numbers of tandem repeats near the carboxy terminus have been identified, and tau is hyperphosphorylated at approximately 25 sites by Erk, GSK-3, and CDK5 (1,2). Phosphorylation decreases the ability of tau to bind to microtubules. Neurofibrillary tangles are a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; these tangles are bundles of paired helical filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. In particular, phosphorylation at Ser396 by GSK-3 or CDK5 destabilizes microtubules. Furthermore, research studies have shown that inclusions of tau are found in a number of other neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as tauopathies (1,3).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CD5 is a type-I transmembrane protein belonging to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) family, characterized by the presence of at least one SRCR domain of 90-110 amino acids. CD5 is expressed by all mature T cells, the B-1a subset of mature B cells, and some leukemic B cells. Its expression is increased in regulatory T and B cells (Tregs/Bregs). Anergic T and B cells also have elevated CD5 expression. Elevated levels of CD5 are also found in many autoimmune disorders (1-3). CD5 is associated with the T cell receptor (TCR) and negatively modulates T cell activation and differentiation. CD5 expression on the tumor infiltrating T lymphocytes is inversely correlated with their antitumor activity (4-6). Recently it was reported that CD5 directly binds to IL6 and can mediate downstream signaling. CD5+ B cells promote tumor growth in animal models (7). Reagents targeting CD5 have been actively pursued as therapeutic interventions for cancer and other conditions (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$326
100 tests
500 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to redFluor™ 710 and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The protein phosphatase (PTP) receptor CD45 is a type I transmembrane protein comprised of a pair of intracellular tyrosine phosphatase domains and a variable extracellular domain generated by alternative splicing (1). The catalytic activity of CD45 is a function of the first phosphatase domain (D1) while the second phosphatase domain (D2) may interact with and stabilize the first domain, or recruit/bind substrates (2,3). CD45 interacts directly with antigen receptor complex proteins or activates Src family kinases involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell antigen receptor signaling (1). Specifically, CD45 dephosphorylates Src-family kinases Lck and Fyn at their conserved negative regulatory carboxy-terminal tyrosine residues and upregulates kinase activity. Conversely, studies indicate that CD45 can also inhibit Lck and Fyn by dephosphorylating their positive regulatory autophosphorylation site. CD45 appears to be both a positive and a negative regulator that conducts signals depending on specific stimuli and cell type (1). Human leukocytes including lymphocytes, eosinophils, monocytes, basophils, and neutrophils express CD45, while erythrocytes and platelets are negative for CD45 expression (4).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Olfactomedin-4 (OLFM4, hGC-1) is a member of the Olfactomedin family, a small group of extracellular proteins defined by the presence of a conserved "Olfactomedin domain" that is thought to facilitate protein-protein interactions (1). OLFM4 is a secreted glycoprotein, which forms disulfide bond-mediated oligomers, and is thought to mediate cell adhesion through its interactions with extracellular matrix proteins such as lectins (2). Human OLFM4 was first cloned from myeloid cells (3) and is expressed in a distinct subset of neutrophils, though the functional significance of this differential expression pattern remains unclear (4). Among normal tissues, the expression of OLFM4 protein is most abundant in intestinal crypts (5), where it has garnered attention as a possible marker of intestinal stem cells (6). Notably, OLFM4 expression is markedly increased in several tumor types, including colorectal, gastric, pancreas, lung, and breast (reviewed in [1]). Furthermore, research studies show that the expression levels of OLFM4 vary in relation to the severity and/or differentiation status of multiple tumor types (1, 6-8), leading to the suggestion that OLFM4 may have utility as a prognostic marker in some cancer patients (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), also known as CCL2, monocyte chemotactic activating factor (MCAF) or glioma-derived chemotactic factor-2 (GDCF-2), is the product of the human JE gene and a member of the family of C-C (or β) chemokines (1-4). The predicted molecular weight of MCP-1 protein is 11-13 kDa, but it may migrate at 20-30 kDa due to glycosylation. MCP-1 is secreted by a variety of cell types in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli and was originally described for its chemotactic activity on monocytes. This activity has led to studies demonstrating its role in diseases characterized by monocyte infiltrates such as psoriasis (5), rheumatoid arthritis (6) and atherosclerosis (7). MCP-1 may also contribute to tumor progression and angiogenesis (8). Signaling by MCP-1 is mediated by the G-protein coupled receptor CCR2 (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein containing multiple amino-terminal extracellular Ig-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a short carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domain (1). Alternative splicing generates two isoforms of VCAM-1 (2). The role of VCAM-1 during infection and inflammatory diseases is well characterized. Expression of VCAM-1 is induced in endothelial cells by inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β (1). VCAM-1 on endothelial cells interacts with the integrin VLA-4 (α4β1) on leukocytes to mediate migration of circulating leukocytes from the blood across the endothelium and into tissues (3).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Acetyl-Histone H3 (Lys27) (D5E4) XP® Rabbit mAb #8173.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). Histone acetylation occurs mainly on the amino-terminal tail domains of histones H2A (Lys5), H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20), H3 (Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, 36 and 56), and H4 (Lys5, 8, 12, and 16) and is important for the regulation of histone deposition, transcriptional activation, DNA replication, recombination, and DNA repair (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites for a protein module called the bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins contain bromodomains and may be recruited to gene promoters, in part, through binding of acetylated histone tails. Histone acetylation is mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), such as CBP/p300, GCN5L2, PCAF, and Tip60, which are recruited to genes by DNA-bound protein factors to facilitate transcriptional activation (3). Deacetylation, which is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDAC and sirtuin proteins), reverses the effects of acetylation and generally facilitates transcriptional repression (7,8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), also independently identified as muscle-enriched cytoplasmic protein (MYP), is a CARD domain protein that regulates apoptosis (1). The ARC protein CARD domain is highly homologous to those in other cell death regulators, including caspase-2, caspase-9, RAIDD, and Apaf-1 (2). The NOL3 gene encodes both the cytoplasmic ARC protein and a 30 kDa nucleolar protein (Nop30) that is involved in RNA splicing. ARC is encoded from isoform 2 of NOL3, while isoform 1 produced by alternative splicing encodes Nop30. Both ARC and Nop30 proteins share common amino-terminal sequences (3). Research studies show that ARC can bind to caspase-8 and caspase-2 and inhibit apoptosis through extrinsic pathways that involve the receptor proteins Fas, TNFR1, and DR3 (1). Additional research indicates that the ARC anti-apoptotic mechanism may include both intrinsic (mitochondrial) and extrinsic (death receptor) pathways (4). In addition to binding caspases, ARC can disrupt the interaction with the death domains of Fas and FADD, which inhibits death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) assembly. The CARD domain of ARC can inhibit intrinsic apoptosis through binding to the pro-apoptotic Bax protein (5). Phosphorylation of ARC at Thr149 by CK2 is required for targeting of ARC to the mitochondria (6). ARC is able to suppress necroptosis, a programmed pathway of necrosis triggered by blocking the recruitment of RIP1 to TNFR1 (7). Expression of ARC protein is predominantly seen in terminally differentiated cells under normal conditions and is markedly induced in a variety of cancers including pancreatic, colorectal, breast, lung, glioblastoma, liver, kidney, melanoma, and acute myeloid leukemia (1, 8-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CD28 is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed by T cells as well as some other hematopoietic cells (1, 2). T cell activation requires T cell receptor (TCR) recognition of antigen presented in the context of MHC molecules. CD28 acts as a T cell costimulatory receptor, and interaction of CD28 with its ligands CD80 or CD86 provides the second signal required for naïve T cell activation (3-5). Activation of naïve T cells in the absence of CD28 stimulation can result in a state of T cell anergy, or unresponsiveness (3). CD28 signals through cytoplasmic phospho-tyrosine motifs that bind several SH2 or SH3 domain-containing proteins involved in T cell activation (2). Recently, CD28 was demonstrated to be a preferred target of PD-1-mediated dephosphorylation. Consistently, CD28 expression was required for T cell proliferation following PD-1 blockade and CD28 stimulation was required for effective anti-PD-1 cancer immunotherapy in mice (6, 7). Several CD28 isoforms are produced by alternative splicing (8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated CD133 (A8N6N) Mouse mAb (Flow Specific) #60577.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: CD133, also known as Prominin, was first described as a cell surface marker recognized by monoclonal antibody AC133 on putative hematopoietic stem cells (1). Subsequent cDNA cloning indicated that CD133 is a five-transmembrane protein with a predicated molecular weight of 97 kDa. Due to heavy glycosylation, its apparent molecular weight is 130 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE analysis (2). Besides blood stem cells, CD133 is expressed on and used to isolate other stem cells, including cancer stem cells (3-7). A deletion mutation in CD133 produces aberrant protein localization and may result in retinal degeneration in humans (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CrkL, a 39 kDa adaptor protein, has a key regulatory role in hematopoietic cells. CrkL has one SH2 and two SH3 domains, with 60% homology to CrkII (1). The amino-terminal SH3 domain of CrkL binds proteins such as C3G, SOS, PI3K, c-Abl and BCR/Abl. The SH2 domain of CrkL can bind to tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins such as Cbl, HEF1, CAS and paxillin (2,3). CrkL is involved in various signaling cascades initiated by different cytokines and growth factors. The biological outcomes of the Crk-activated signal transduction include the modulation of cell adhesion, cell migration and immune cell responses (4). CrkL is a prominent substrate of the BCR/Abl oncoprotein in chronic myelogenous leukemia and binds to both BCR/Abl and c-Abl (5). CrkL is prominently and constitutively tyrosine phosphorylated in CML neutrophils and is not phosphorylated in normal neutrophils. Moreover, stimulation of normal neutrophils with cytokines and agonists does not induce tyrosine phosphorylation of this protein (6), indicating that it may be a useful target for therapeutic intervention or as a disease marker. Tyr207 in CrkL is the BCR/Abl phosphorylation site (7).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated YAP (D8H1X) XP® Rabbit mAb #14074.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: YAP (Yes-associated protein, YAP65) was identified based on its ability to associate with the SH3 domain of Yes. It also binds to other SH3 domain-containing proteins such as Nck, Crk, Src, and Abl (1). In addition to the SH3 binding motif, YAP contains a PDZ interaction motif, a coiled-coil domain, and WW domains (2-4). While initial studies of YAP all pointed towards a role in anchoring and targeting to specific subcellular compartments, subsequent studies showed that YAP is a transcriptional co-activator by virtue of its WW domain interacting with the PY motif (PPxY) of the transcription factor PEBP2 and other transcription factors (5). In its capacity as a transcriptional co-activator, YAP is now widely recognized as a central mediator of the Hippo Pathway, which plays a fundamental and widely conserved role in regulating tissue growth and organ size. Phosphorylation at multiple sites (e.g., Ser109, Ser127) by LATS kinases promotes YAP translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it is sequestered through association with 14-3-3 proteins (6-8). These LATS-driven phosphorylation events serve to prime YAP for subsequent phosphorylation by CK1δ/ε in an adjacent phosphodegron, triggering proteosomal degradation of YAP (9).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Acetyl-Histone H3 (Lys36) (D9T5Q) Rabbit mAb #27683.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). Histone acetylation occurs mainly on the amino-terminal tail domains of histones H2A (Lys5), H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20), H3 (Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, 36 and 56), and H4 (Lys5, 8, 12, and 16) and is important for the regulation of histone deposition, transcriptional activation, DNA replication, recombination, and DNA repair (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites for a protein module called the bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins contain bromodomains and may be recruited to gene promoters, in part, through binding of acetylated histone tails. Histone acetylation is mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), such as CBP/p300, GCN5L2, PCAF, and Tip60, which are recruited to genes by DNA-bound protein factors to facilitate transcriptional activation (3). Deacetylation, which is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDAC and sirtuin proteins), reverses the effects of acetylation and generally facilitates transcriptional repression (7,8).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a hetero-oligomeric enzyme consisting of 13 subunits localized to the inner mitochondrial membrane (1-3). It is the terminal enzyme complex in the respiratory chain, catalyzing the reduction of molecular oxygen to water coupled to the translocation of protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane to drive ATP synthesis. The 3 largest subunits forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA, while the other smaller subunits, including COX IV, are nuclear-encoded. Research studies have shown that deficiency in COX activity correlates with a number of human diseases (4). The COX IV antibody can be used effectively as a mitochondrial loading control in cell-based research assays.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmits TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the recepter-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Briefly, activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved SSXS motif at the carboxy-terminus of the proteins. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad, Smad4, and together the complex moves to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) is a sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter. It is mainly expressed on the luminal membrane of renal epithelial cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TALH) and mediates the majority of NaCl resorption and concentration of urine (1,2). NKCC2 is the target for several diuretic drugs, such as bumetanide, and is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension (3,4). Mutations in the NKCC2-encoding gene, SLC12A1, causes Bartter’s syndrome, which is featured by impaired salt reabsorption in the TALH, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypercalciuria (5,6). Recently, NKCC2 was reported to be expressed in the brain hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system (HNS) and upregulated upon osmotic stress (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Sucrose nonfermenting 2 homolog (SNF2H, SMARCA5) is one of two orthologs of the ISWI (imitation switch) ATPases encoded by the mammalian genome (1). SNF2H is part of the SNF2 family of chromatin remodeling factors that use ATP hydrolysis to catalyze biochemical reactions in several mammalian chromatin-remodeling complexes, including ACF1, RSF1, CHRAC, NoRC, WSTF, and WCRF180 (2). Research studies show that SNF2H is crucial for chromatin organization, DNA damage response, and differentiation (1-7). The SNF2H helicase facilitates DNA damage repair by actively moving nucleosomes for DNA damage response (DDR) proteins to effectively associate with damaged regions (3). Additional studies show that repair of double stranded breaks (DSBs) significantly decreases in the absence of SNF2H (3), and these cells become highly sensitive to DNA damage caused by x-rays and chemical treatments inducing DSBs (4,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycoprotein non-metastatic gene B (GPNMB) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein over expressed in many types of cancer. The GPNMB glycoprotein is involved in many physiological processes, including mediating transport of late melanosomes to keratinocytes (1), regulating osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function (2), stimulating dendritic cell maturation, promoting adhesion of dendritic cells to endothelial cells (3), enhancing autophagosome fusion to lysomes in tissue repair, and regulating degradation of cellular debris (4,5).While typical GPNMB expression is seen in tissues including skin, heart, kidney, lung, liver, and skeletal muscle (3,6), research studies show elevated GPNMB expression often contributes to the metastatic phenotype in numerous cancers (reviewed in 7). GPNMB is typically localized to intracellular compartments in normal cells (1,8), but investigators found it primarily on the cell surface of tumor cells (9,10). Differential localization and expression, and the role of GPNMB as a tumor promoter in many cancer types make this protein a viable therapeutic target (11).The GPNMB ectodomain can be cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases and shed from the cell surface (12). Research studies identify the sheddase ADAM10 as one peptidase responsible for cleavage of the GPNMB ectodomain at the surface of breast cancer cells. Shedded GPNMB ectodomains may promote angiogenesis by inducing endothelial cell migration (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and CRISPR-associated proteins) are RNA-guided nuclease effectors that are utilized for precise genome editing in mammalian systems (1). Cpf1 (CRISPR from Prevotella and Francisella) are members of the Class 2 CRISPR system (2). Class 2 CRISPR systems, such as the well characterized Cas9, rely on single-component effector proteins to mediate DNA interference (3). Cpf1 endonucleases, compared to Cas9 systems, have several unique features that increase the utility of CRISPR-based genome editing techniques: 1) Cpf1-mediated cleavage relies on a single and short CRISPR RNA (crRNA) without the requirement of a trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA), 2) Cpf1 utilizes T-Rich protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences rather than a G-Rich PAM, and 3) Cpf1 generates a staggered, rather than a blunt-ended, DNA double-stranded break (2). These features broaden the utility of using CRISPR-Cas systems for specific gene regulation and therapeutic applications. Several Cpf1 bacterial orthologs have been characterized for CRISPR-mediated mammalian genome editing (2, 4).