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Product listing: NF-κB1 p105/p50 (D4P4D) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P25799 #13586 to LXR-β (D6M9D) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID P55055 #13519

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The process of SUMO conjugation to target proteins is similar to the molecular chain of events observed with ubiquitin (1). SUMO is conjugated to target proteins through the coordinated action of the cellular SUMO conjugation machinery, which consists of the E1, E2, and E3 enzymes (2). The canonical SUMO E1 activating enzyme is a heterodimer consisting of Ubiquitin-like 1-activating enzyme E1A (UBLE1A, SAE1) and UBLE1B (SAE2, UBA2) subunits. Mature SUMO is activated by E1 in an ATP-dependent reaction that generates adenylated SUMO, which functions as a high-energy intermediate in the formation of a thioester linkage between SUMO and Cys173 of SAE2 (3,4). SUMO is subsequently transferred from SAE2 to the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme UBE2I (5). Research studies indicate that UBLE1A (SAE1) is a nuclear protein and c-Myc transcriptional target whose expression is required for Myc-driven tumorigenesis (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Wilms' Tumor 1 (WT1) is a transcription factor named from Wilms' Tumor 1, an embryonal malignancy of the kidneys that is caused by mutations in the WT1 gene (1). It is highly important in development, particularly of the genitourinary system, and mutations and dysregulation of expression of WT1 result in a variety of syndromes affecting the genitourinal system and other tissues (2-5).WT1 has a myriad of biological functions and a host of interacting partners and target genes (6). It can behave as a transcriptional activator, or a repressor, and can act as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor (7). It exerts influence over the epigenetic landscape, and also has post translational influence of gene expression through RNA interactions (8). The diverse biological roles of WT1 have been attributed to the existence of multiple isoforms and post translation modifications of the protein (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin is an evolutionarily conserved, actin-binding protein that severs actin filaments during processes that rely on actin filament dynamics, including cytokinesis, cell migration, invasion, and neuronal development. Actin severing and filament depolymerization are regulated through the controlled cycling of cofilin between the phosphorylated and dephosphorylated forms (1). The kinases LIMK and TESK inactivate cofilin by phosphorylating it at Ser3 (2,3). The slingshot homologs (SSH1, SSH2 and SSH3) and chronophin/PDXP phosphatases remove phosphate from cofilin at Ser3, enabling cofilin binding to actin and filament depolymerization (3). LIMK and SSH1 regulate cofilin activity downstream of neuregulin signaling in Schwann cells (4).Slingshot homolog 1 (SSH1) can also dephosphorylate LIMK kinases, suppressing LIMK phosphorylation of cofilin (5). In addition, SSH1 modulates actin dynamics by stabilizing F-actin and promoting actin bundling independent of its cofilin phosphatase activity (6). SSH1 activity is regulated by phosphorylation and protein-protein interaction through various signaling pathways (1). Binding of SSH1 to F-actin stimulates its cofilin phosphatase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-p90RSK (Ser380) (D5D8) Rabbit mAb #12032.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinases (RSK1-4) are a family of widely expressed Ser/Thr kinases characterized by two nonidentical, functional kinase domains (1) and a carboxy-terminal docking site for extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) (2). Several sites both within and outside of the RSK kinase domain, including Ser380, Thr359, Ser363, and Thr573, are important for kinase activation (3). RSK1-3 are activated via coordinated phosphorylation by MAPKs, autophosphorylation, and phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K) in response to many growth factors, polypeptide hormones, and neurotransmitters (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). It is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but is also associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and is directed by a number of autophagy-related (Atg) genes.Vacuolar trafficking and autophagy are controlled by the class III type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, which generates phosphoinositide-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) (4,5). Atg18 and Atg21 are two related WD-repeat proteins that bind PtdIns3P via a conserved Phe-Arg-Arg-Gly motif (6,7). It has been shown that Atg18 binds to Atg2 and that this complex is directed to vacuolar membranes by its interaction with PtdIns3P (8). Human orthologs of Atg18 and Atg21 were identified as members of the WD-repeat protein Interacting with Phosphoinositides (WIPI) family (9-11). WIPI1 (also called WIPI49) and WIPI2 have been shown to translocate from several vacuolar compartments to LC3-positive autophagosomes during autophagy; this translocation may be used as an autophagy marker (12).

$364
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-RelB (Ser552) (D41B9) XP® Rabbit mAb #5025.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

PTMScan® Technology employs a proprietary methodology from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) for peptide enrichment by immunoprecipitation using a specific bead-conjugated antibody in conjunction with liquid chromatography (LC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for quantitative profiling of post-translational modification (PTM) sites in cellular proteins. These include phosphorylation (PhosphoScan®), ubiquitination (UbiScan®), acetylation (AcetylScan®), and methylation (MethylScan®), among others. PTMScan® Technology enables researchers to isolate, identify, and quantitate large numbers of post-translationally modified cellular peptides with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, providing a global overview of PTMs in cell and tissue samples without preconceived biases about where these modified sites occur (1). For more information on PTMScan® Proteomics Services, please visit www.cellsignal.com/common/content/content.jsp?id=ptmscan-services.

Background: Arginine methylation is a prevalent PTM found on both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. Arginine methylated proteins are involved in many different cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, signal transduction, RNA metabolism, and DNA damage repair (1-3). Arginine methylation is carried out by the arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) family of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to a guanidine nitrogen of arginine (4). There are three different types of arginine methylation: asymmetric dimethylarginine (aDMA, omega-NG,NG-dimethylarginine), where two methyl groups are placed on one of the terminal nitrogen atoms of the guanidine group of arginine; symmetric dimethylarginine (sDMA, omega-NG,N’G-dimethylarginine), where one methyl group is placed on each of the two terminal guanidine nitrogens of arginine; and monomethylarginine (MMA, omega-NG-dimethylarginine), where a single methyl group is placed on one of the terminal nitrogen atoms of arginine. Each of these modifications has potentially different functional consequences. Though all PRMT proteins catalyze the formation of MMA, Type I PRMTs (PRMT1, 3, 4, and 6) add an additional methyl group to produce aDMA, while Type II PRMTs (PRMT5 and 7) produce sDMA. Methylated arginine residues often reside in glycine-arginine rich (GAR) protein domains, such as RGG, RG, and RXR repeats (5). However, PRMT4/CARM1 and PRMT5 methylate arginine residues within proline-glycine-methionine rich (PGM) motifs (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The kindlin family of focal adhesion proteins is involved in multiple biological processes, including integrin signaling, adhesion, migration, angiogenesis, differentiation, and mitotic spindle formation (1,2). Kindlin family members 1, 2, and 3 (FERM1, FERM2, and URP2) are differentially expressed in tissues. Kindlin-1 is primarily expressed in epithelial cells, kindlin-2 is ubiquitously expressed, and kindlin-3 expression is restricted to the hematopoietic system (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: L-DOPA decarboxylase (DDC) is a pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-DOPA to dopamine (1) and L-5HTP to serotonin (2). By catalyzing the reaction to produce dopamine, DDC is involved in many important metabolic processes and plays a central role in the complex neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network (1). DDC is expressed in the central nervous system (3), but has also been detected in some peripheral organs such as the liver and adrenal gland, as well as leukocytes of rat and human (1). DDC is thought to be the sole enzyme responsible for the synthesis of the trace amines 2-phenylethylamine, p-tyramine, and tryptamine, which are considered to act as neuromodulators (2,4). DDC is also regarded as a general biomarker for neuroendocrine tumors (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The mTORC1 kinase complex plays a critical role in cell growth regulation (1,2). mTORC1 activity is modulated by energy levels, growth factors, and amino acids (3,4). Four related GTPases (RagA, RagB, RagC, and RagD) interact with raptor in mTORC1, which is necessary and sufficient for mTORC1 activation in response to amino acid signals (1,2). The GAP Activity Towards Rags (GATOR) complex interacts with Rag GTPases and is made up of a pair of protein subcomplexes (5). The GATOR1 subcomplex includes the proteins DEPDC5, Nprl2 and Nprl3, and is a RagA and RagB GTPase-activating protein (GAP) that negatively regulates mTORC1 signaling. Conversely, the GATOR2 subcomplex (including Mios, WDR24, WDR59, Seh1L and Sec13 proteins) is a positive regulator of mTORC1 signaling (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Prolactin receptor (PRLR) is a single-pass transmembrane receptor that mediates the actions of prolactin, a peptide hormone secreted by the anterior pituitary. PRLR is a type 1 cytokine receptor that is best known for promoting lactation in mammals, but which is also implicated in osmoregulation, metabolism, and immune system function (1). Research studies suggest that PRLR activation may promote tumor growth (2). Prolactin signaling via PRLR can activate multiple signal transduction pathways in breast cancer cells, including the Jak/Stat, PI3K/Akt, and MAPK pathways, leading to both pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic downstream effects (3,4). Nine isoforms of PRLR have been identified, with the canonical (long) isoform primarily responsible for the pro-oncogenic effects of PRLR in some cancer cell lines (3). Much less is known about the functions of the other prolactin receptor isoforms. Defining the precise role of PRLR in promoting growth of breast cancer and other tumor types remains an area of active investigation (2).

The Griess Reagent Nitrite Measurement Kit can be used to indirectly detect nitric oxide (NO) through the measurement one of its stable oxidation products, nitrite. Nitrite reacts with sulfanilamide and N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine dihydrochloride (NED) to yield a pink azo dye. The azo dye produced in this assay can be measured spectrophotometrically using its absorbance at 550 nM.
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is a large multi-protein complex that functions as a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, catalyzing the transcription of DNA into RNA using the four ribonucleoside triphosphates as substrates (1). The largest subunit, RNAPII subunit B1 (Rpb1), also known as RNAPII subunit A (POLR2A), contains a unique heptapeptide sequence (Tyr1,Ser2,Pro3,Thr4,Ser5,Pro6,Ser7), which is repeated up to 52 times in the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein (1). This CTD heptapeptide repeat is subject to multiple post-translational modifications, which dictate the functional state of the polymerase complex. Phosphorylation of the CTD during the active transcription cycle integrates transcription with chromatin remodeling and nascent RNA processing by regulating the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes and RNA processing proteins to the transcribed gene (1). During transcription initiation, RNAPII contains a hypophosphorylated CTD and is recruited to gene promoters through interactions with DNA-bound transcription factors and the Mediator complex (1). The escape of RNAPII from gene promoters requires phosphorylation at Ser5 by CDK7, the catalytic subunit of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) (2). Phosphorylation at Ser5 mediates the recruitment of RNA capping enzymes, in addition to histone H3 Lys4 methyltransferases, which function to regulate transcription initiation and chromatin structure (3,4). After promoter escape, RNAPII proceeds down the gene to an intrinsic pause site, where it is halted by the negative elongation factors NELF and DSIF (5). At this point, RNAPII is unstable and frequently aborts transcription and dissociates from the gene. Productive transcription elongation requires phosphorylation at Ser2 by CDK9, the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor P-TEFb (6). Phosphorylation at Ser2 creates a stable transcription elongation complex and facilitates recruitment of RNA splicing and polyadenylation factors, in addition to histone H3 Lys36 methyltransferases, which function to promote elongation-compatible chromatin (7,8). Ser2/Ser5-phosphorylated RNAPII then transcribes the entire length of the gene to the 3' end, where transcription is terminated. RNAPII dissociates from the DNA and is recycled to the hypophosphorylated form by various CTD phosphatases (1).In addition to Ser2/Ser5 phosphorylation, Ser7 of the CTD heptapeptide repeat is also phosphorylated during the active transcription cycle. Phosphorylation at Ser7 is required for efficient transcription of small nuclear (sn) RNA genes (9,10). snRNA genes, which are neither spliced nor poly-adenylated, are structurally different from protein-coding genes. Instead of a poly(A) signal found in protein-coding RNAs, snRNAs contain a conserved 3'-box RNA processing element, which is recognized by the Integrator snRNA 3' end processing complex (11,12). Phosphorylation at Ser7 by CDK7 during the early stages of transcription facilitates recruitment of RPAP2, which dephosphorylates Ser5, creating a dual Ser2/Ser7 phosphorylation mark that facilitates recruitment of the Integrator complex and efficient processing of nascent snRNA transcripts (13-15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Poliovirus receptor (PVR, CD155) is an immunoglobulin-like, transmembrane glycoprotein originally described as a mediator of poliovirus attachment to cells and later identified as important in adherens junction formation. Also known as nectin-like 5 (Necl-5), PVR binds nectin-3 and interacts with integrin αvβ3 and PDGFR to regulate integrin clustering and focal contact formation at the leading edge of migrating cells (1,2). Research studies demonstrate that PVR and nectin-3 regulate contact inhibition during cell motility and proliferation in transformed 3T3 cells (3). Additional research indicates that PVR (CD155, Necl-5) expression may play a role in invasiveness of lung adenocarcinoma (4,5). In the immune system, CD155 plays a role in natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DSS-AHC critical region on the X chromosome protein 1 (DAX1) is an orphan nuclear receptor encoded by the nuclear receptor subfamily 0 group B member 1 (NR0B1) gene. DAX1 possesses an atypical DNA binding domain that allows it to form heterodimeric complexes with DNA binding partners and repress transcriptional activity (1,2). During development, DAX1 is important for establishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal gonadal axis. The receptor is essential for development of several important hormone-producing organs that determine this axis, including the adrenal glands, pituitary, hypothalamus, and the male and female reproductive organs (3,4). Research studies suggest that DAX1 plays a role in maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (5,6). Loss of DAX1 function through deletion or mutation results in adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (7), while duplication of the NR0B1 gene on the X-chromosome causes dosage-sensitive sex reversal (8).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Non-phospho (Active) β-Catenin (Ser33/37/Thr41) (D13A1) Rabbit mAb #8814.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: β-Catenin is a key downstream effector in the Wnt signaling pathway (1). It is implicated in two major biological processes in vertebrates: early embryonic development (2) and tumorigenesis (3). CK1 phosphorylates β-catenin at Ser45. This phosphorylation event primes β-catenin for subsequent phosphorylation by GSK-3β (4-6). GSK-3β destabilizes β-catenin by phosphorylating it at Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41 (7). Mutations at these sites result in the stabilization of β-catenin protein levels and have been found in many tumor cell lines (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). Histone acetylation occurs mainly on the amino-terminal tail domains of histones H2A (Lys5), H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20), H3 (Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, 36 and 56), and H4 (Lys5, 8, 12, and 16) and is important for the regulation of histone deposition, transcriptional activation, DNA replication, recombination, and DNA repair (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites for a protein module called the bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins contain bromodomains and may be recruited to gene promoters, in part, through binding of acetylated histone tails. Histone acetylation is mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), such as CBP/p300, GCN5L2, PCAF, and Tip60, which are recruited to genes by DNA-bound protein factors to facilitate transcriptional activation (3). Deacetylation, which is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDAC and sirtuin proteins), reverses the effects of acetylation and generally facilitates transcriptional repression (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TRIBBLES proteins belong to a small family of serine-threonine kinase-like proteins characterized by the presence of a variant protein kinase motif (lacking a canonical ATP binding site), a MEK-1 binding site, and a C-terminal COP1 site that binds ubiquitin ligase. The tribbles gene was first identified and characterized in Drosophila genetic screens for genes that regulate cell division, gastrulation and oogenesis (1-3). Research studies in Drosophila suggested that Tribbles functions to coordinate cell division by regulating turnover of the cell cycle protein String/cdc25. In contrast to the Drosophila genome, which contains a single tribbles gene, the genomes of mice and humans encode three known TRIBBLES proteins (TRIB1-3), which exhibit both distinct and overlapping patterns of expression and functions (4). For example, TRIB1 and TRIB2, but not TRIB3, were reported to promote degradation of the basic region-leucine zipper transcription factor C/EBPα, a function that appears to be conserved from flies to humans (5,6). TRIB2 is overexpressed in a subset of human AML patient samples, down-regulated in leukemic cells undergoing proliferation arrest (7), and positively regulated by the NOTCH signaling pathway in T cells (8), while retroviral-mediated overexpression of Trib2 in mice was shown to induce transplantable leukemia (7). These finding collectively suggest that TRIB2 functions as an oncogene in the mammalian hematopoietic system (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: In multicellular organisms, intercellular junctions play essential roles in tissue integrity and maintenance of cell polarity. Tight junctions (TJs) form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium (reviewed in 1). Adherens junctions (AJs) are dynamic structures that form cell-cell contacts linking cells into a continuous sheet (reviewed in 2). The actin filament-binding protein, Afadin, binds to nectin forming a connection to the actin cytoskeleton (3). AJs are formed when nectin assembles cadherin at the cell-cell adhesion site and these junctions are then involved in the formation and maintenance of TJs (4,5). Afadin has two splice variants: l-afadin, which is ubiquitously expressed, and s-afadin, which is expressed predominantly in neural tissue. s-Afadin is a shorter form lacking one of the three proline-rich regions found in l-afadin, as well as the carboxyl-terminal F-actin binding region (6). Human s-afadin is identical to AF-6, the ALL-1 fusion partner involved in acute myeloid leukemias (7). Recent work has also shown that afadin is involved in controlling the directionality of cell movement when it is localized at the leading edge of moving cells (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interferon-induced transmembrane protein (IFITM) family members are composed of short amino- and carboxy-termini, two transmembrane domains, and a cytoplasmic domain (1). There are four family members in humans: IFITM1, IFITM2, IFITM3, and IFITM5 (2,3). Mice have two additional family members, IFITM6 and IFITM7 (2,3). Basal expression of IFITM proteins is observed in some cells and expression can also be induced by type I and type II interferons (4-6). The primary function of IFITM family proteins appears to be viral restriction, as IFITM proteins inhibit cytosolic entry of viruses by preventing fusion of viral and host membranes (7,8). The mechanism by which IFITM proteins inhibit fusion is unclear. Although IFITM proteins are present on both the plasma membrane and intracellular membranes, they most effectively restrict viral fusion in late endosomes and lysosomes (8,9). In addition, different family members exhibit specific viral preferences (9). For example, IFITM3 is most effective at restricting influenza A infection, while IFITM1 is more successful in controlling filoviruses and SARS (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The receptor-interacting protein (RIP) family of serine-threonine kinases (RIP, RIP2, RIP3, and RIP4) are important regulators of cellular stress that trigger pro-survival and inflammatory responses through the activation of NF-κB, as well as pro-apoptotic pathways (1). In addition to the kinase domain, RIP contains a death domain responsible for interaction with the death domain receptor Fas and recruitment to TNF-R1 through interaction with TRADD (2,3). RIP-deficient cells show a failure in TNF-mediated NF-κB activation, making the cells more sensitive to apoptosis (4,5). RIP also interacts with TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and can recruit IKKs to the TNF-R1 signaling complex via interaction with NEMO, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation (6,7). Overexpression of RIP induces both NF-κB activation and apoptosis (2,3). Caspase-8-dependent cleavage of the RIP death domain can trigger the apoptotic activity of RIP (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The yeast nucleotide excision repair (NER) radiation sensitive protein 23 (rad23) and its human homologs Rad23A (hHR23A) and Rad23B (hHR23B) are critical components of the cellular machinery that recognize DNA lesions and serve as receptors that target ubiquitinated substrates to the proteasome for degradation (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is a large multi-protein complex that functions as a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, catalyzing the transcription of DNA into RNA using the four ribonucleoside triphosphates as substrates (1). The largest subunit, RNAPII subunit B1 (Rpb1), also known as RNAPII subunit A (POLR2A), contains a unique heptapeptide sequence (Tyr1,Ser2,Pro3,Thr4,Ser5,Pro6,Ser7), which is repeated up to 52 times in the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein (1). This CTD heptapeptide repeat is subject to multiple post-translational modifications, which dictate the functional state of the polymerase complex. Phosphorylation of the CTD during the active transcription cycle integrates transcription with chromatin remodeling and nascent RNA processing by regulating the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes and RNA processing proteins to the transcribed gene (1). During transcription initiation, RNAPII contains a hypophosphorylated CTD and is recruited to gene promoters through interactions with DNA-bound transcription factors and the Mediator complex (1). The escape of RNAPII from gene promoters requires phosphorylation at Ser5 by CDK7, the catalytic subunit of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) (2). Phosphorylation at Ser5 mediates the recruitment of RNA capping enzymes, in addition to histone H3 Lys4 methyltransferases, which function to regulate transcription initiation and chromatin structure (3,4). After promoter escape, RNAPII proceeds down the gene to an intrinsic pause site, where it is halted by the negative elongation factors NELF and DSIF (5). At this point, RNAPII is unstable and frequently aborts transcription and dissociates from the gene. Productive transcription elongation requires phosphorylation at Ser2 by CDK9, the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor P-TEFb (6). Phosphorylation at Ser2 creates a stable transcription elongation complex and facilitates recruitment of RNA splicing and polyadenylation factors, in addition to histone H3 Lys36 methyltransferases, which function to promote elongation-compatible chromatin (7,8). Ser2/Ser5-phosphorylated RNAPII then transcribes the entire length of the gene to the 3' end, where transcription is terminated. RNAPII dissociates from the DNA and is recycled to the hypophosphorylated form by various CTD phosphatases (1).In addition to Ser2/Ser5 phosphorylation, Ser7 of the CTD heptapeptide repeat is also phosphorylated during the active transcription cycle. Phosphorylation at Ser7 is required for efficient transcription of small nuclear (sn) RNA genes (9,10). snRNA genes, which are neither spliced nor poly-adenylated, are structurally different from protein-coding genes. Instead of a poly(A) signal found in protein-coding RNAs, snRNAs contain a conserved 3'-box RNA processing element, which is recognized by the Integrator snRNA 3' end processing complex (11,12). Phosphorylation at Ser7 by CDK7 during the early stages of transcription facilitates recruitment of RPAP2, which dephosphorylates Ser5, creating a dual Ser2/Ser7 phosphorylation mark that facilitates recruitment of the Integrator complex and efficient processing of nascent snRNA transcripts (13-15).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Arginine methylation is a prevalent PTM found on both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. Arginine methylated proteins are involved in many different cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, signal transduction, RNA metabolism, and DNA damage repair (1-3). Arginine methylation is carried out by the arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) family of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to a guanidine nitrogen of arginine (4). There are three different types of arginine methylation: asymmetric dimethylarginine (aDMA, omega-NG,NG-dimethylarginine), where two methyl groups are placed on one of the terminal nitrogen atoms of the guanidine group of arginine; symmetric dimethylarginine (sDMA, omega-NG,N’G-dimethylarginine), where one methyl group is placed on each of the two terminal guanidine nitrogens of arginine; and monomethylarginine (MMA, omega-NG-dimethylarginine), where a single methyl group is placed on one of the terminal nitrogen atoms of arginine. Each of these modifications has potentially different functional consequences. Though all PRMT proteins catalyze the formation of MMA, Type I PRMTs (PRMT1, 3, 4, and 6) add an additional methyl group to produce aDMA, while Type II PRMTs (PRMT5 and 7) produce sDMA. Methylated arginine residues often reside in glycine-arginine rich (GAR) protein domains, such as RGG, RG, and RXR repeats (5). However, PRMT4/CARM1 and PRMT5 methylate arginine residues within proline-glycine-methionine rich (PGM) motifs (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Spastic paraplegia 20 (spartin) is encoded by the SPG20 gene in humans, which is altered in some individuals with an autosomal recessive form of hereditary spastic paraplegia known as Troyer syndrome (1,2). While Troyer syndrome research studies have yet to clearly describe the subcellular localization or function of spartin, additional work implicates spartin in endosomal trafficking, microtubule dynamics, and lipid homoeostasis (3-5). This multifunctional protein is ubiquitously expressed within the nervous system and in non-neuronal tissues, and displays a diverse pattern of cellular localization (6). The SPG20 gene promoter is hypermethylated in many cases of colorectal cancer, which results in decreased spartin expression and cytokinesis arrest. This suggests that spartin expression and methylation state could be a promising biomarker for colorectal tumors (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Liver X receptors LXR-α and LXR-β are nuclear hormone receptor superfamily members responsible for regulating expression of target genes that control cholesterol transport and metabolism (1). When bound by the oxidized derivatives of cholesterol (oxysterols), activated LXR receptors function as sterol sensors to regulate transcription of the genes involved in the cholesterol homeostasis (1,2). The LXR-α protein is expressed at high levels in rat liver, kidney, intestine, adipose, and spleen; LXR-β is more ubiquitously expressed within rat tissues (1,3). Research studies indicate that glucose binds and up-regulates the transcriptional activity of LXR-α and LXR-β (4). LXR-α and LXR-β are putative glucose sensors that integrate glucose metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis in the liver (4). Additional studies show that female mice deficient in LXR-β develop gallbladder cancer (5). In addition, LXR-β plays a role in protecting dopaminergic neurons in a Parkinson disease model (6).