Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Product listing: Pan-Actin (D18C11) Rabbit mAb (HRP Conjugate), UniProt ID P60709 #12748 to PAX8 (D2S2I) Rabbit mAb, UniProt ID Q06710 #59019

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Pan-Actin (D18C11) Rabbit mAb #8456.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The unconjugated antibody #4545 reacts with keratins 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13 and 18 from human, rat and monkey. CST expects that Pan-Keratin (C11) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor® 488 Conjugate) will also recognize the same keratins in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 555 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluroescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Pan-Keratin (C11) Mouse mAb #4545.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The unconjugated antibody #4545 reacts with keratins 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13 and 18 from human, rat and monkey. CST expects that Pan-Keratin (C11) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor® 647 Conjugate) will also recognize the same keratins in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunofluorescence (Paraffin)

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The unconjugated Pan-Keratin (C11) Mouse mAb #4545 reacts with human, rat and monkey pan-keratin. CST expects that Pan-Keratin (C11) Mouse mAb (Biotinylated) will also recognize pan-keratin in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Pan-Keratin (C11) Mouse mAb #4545.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunofluorescence (Paraffin), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Keratins (cytokeratins) are intermediate filament proteins that are mainly expressed in epithelial cells. Keratin heterodimers composed of an acidic keratin (or type I keratin, keratins 9 to 23) and a basic keratin (or type II keratin, keratins 1 to 8) assemble to form filaments (1,2). Keratin isoforms demonstrate tissue- and differentiation-specific profiles that make them useful as research biomarkers (1). Research studies have shown that mutations in keratin genes are associated with skin disorders, liver and pancreatic diseases, and inflammatory intestinal diseases (3-6).

$364
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology® antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Pan-Methyl-Histone H3 (Lys9) (D54) XP® Rabbit mAb #4473.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Hippo pathway is an important evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway that controls organ size and tumor suppression by inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis (1,2). An integral function of the Hippo pathway is to repress the activity of Yes-associated protein (YAP), a proposed oncogene whose activity is regulated by phosphorylation and subcellular localization (3,4). When the Hippo pathway is turned off, YAP is phosphorylated and translocates to the nucleus where it associates with various transcription factors including members of the transcriptional enhancer factor (TEF) family, also known as the TEA domain (TEAD) family (TEAD1-4) (5,6). Although widely expressed in tissues, the TEAD family proteins have specific tissue and developmental distributions. YAP/TEAD complexes regulate the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis (5).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Pan-TEAD (D3F7L) Rabbit mAb #13295.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Hippo pathway is an important evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway that controls organ size and tumor suppression by inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis (1,2). An integral function of the Hippo pathway is to repress the activity of Yes-associated protein (YAP), a proposed oncogene whose activity is regulated by phosphorylation and subcellular localization (3,4). When the Hippo pathway is turned off, YAP is phosphorylated and translocates to the nucleus where it associates with various transcription factors including members of the transcriptional enhancer factor (TEF) family, also known as the TEA domain (TEAD) family (TEAD1-4) (5,6). Although widely expressed in tissues, the TEAD family proteins have specific tissue and developmental distributions. YAP/TEAD complexes regulate the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Pantothenate kinase 1 (PANK1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in coenzyme A (CoA) synthesis (1,2). PPARα -mediated transcriptional regulation of PANK1 plays an important role in controlling CoA levels in hepatocytes (1). Research studies indicate that PANK1 expression, along with microRNA-107, decreases in a murine macrophage model upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in a PPARα-dependent manner (3). Additional studies show that the corresponding PANK1 gene is a direct target of tumor suppressor p53 and that p53 regulates energy homeostasis through control of PANK1 expression (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PANK2, pantothenate kinase 2, catalyzes the first step in CoA biosynthesis (1,2). Human PANK2 is located in the mitochondria, and research studies have shown some mutations in human PANK2 are linked to neurodegeneration (2). Alternatively, mouse PANK2 localizes in the cytosol, and defective PANK2 in mice leads to retinal degeneration (1,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Panthothenate kinase (PANK) is an enzyme that is responsible for catalyzing the first step in coenzyme A (CoA) synthesis (1-4). There are four human PANK genes (PANK1-4) (1-4). PANK4 is ubiquitously expressed, but higher expression levels are observed in muscle (1,2). PANK4 expression is elevated in rat skeletal muscle under high glucose conditions (2). There is evidence that rat PANK4 colocalizes with pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) in vitro (2). PANK4 may also play a protective role in beta-cell apoptosis by lowering the levels of pro-caspase-9 (3). Research studies have shown that mutations in the PANK2 gene are associated with Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), formerly known as Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome (1,4). Expression of hPANK4 in a Drosophila model of NBIA rescues the phenotype with the exception of infertility (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Panthothenate kinase (PANK) is an enzyme that is responsible for catalyzing the first step in coenzyme A (CoA) synthesis (1-4). There are four human PANK genes (PANK1-4) (1-4). PANK4 is ubiquitously expressed, but higher expression levels are observed in muscle (1,2). PANK4 expression is elevated in rat skeletal muscle under high glucose conditions (2). There is evidence that rat PANK4 colocalizes with pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) in vitro (2). PANK4 may also play a protective role in beta-cell apoptosis by lowering the levels of pro-caspase-9 (3). Research studies have shown that mutations in the PANK2 gene are associated with Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), formerly known as Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome (1,4). Expression of hPANK4 in a Drosophila model of NBIA rescues the phenotype with the exception of infertility (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The pannexin family (pannexin-1, -2, and -3; PANX1-3) of gap junction proteins has homology to the invertebrate innexins and display distinct expression patterns (1). Pannexin-1 is widely expressed, with highest expression in the heart, brain, skeletal muscle, testis, and ovary (1,2). Pannexin-2 is predominately expressed in the brain (1,2) and pannexin-3 is found within the skin and connective tissues (1,3). Connexin family gap junction proteins form hemichannels that align adjacent cells, creating functional intercellular channels that are permeable to ions and small molecules. In contrast, pannexin proteins may not function as gap junction proteins since pannexins on adjacent cells may not align to form complete channels (3). These pannexin “hemichannels” may play a role in inflammation, apoptosis, and neuronal signaling by allowing permeability of ions, ATP, and potentially other small molecules into the extracellular space (4-6). Pannexin-1 can be activated by effector caspases (caspase-3 and -7), which leads to release of signal molecules that promote phagocytosis of apoptotic cells (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PAR2 (F2RL1) belongs to the PAR (Protease-activated Receptor) family of G protein-coupled receptors. These membrane receptors are activated through N-terminal cleavage of the receptor by a serine protease such as thrombin, trypsin, or matrix metalloproteinases (1,2). This cleavage exposes the ‘tethered-ligand’ fragment of the receptor, which binds to a second extracellular loop of the receptor and leads to receptor activation. PAR2 is specifically activated by trypsin or trypsin-like proteases. Activated PAR2 stimulates phosphoinositide hydrolysis and calcium mobilization, interacts with β-arrestin, and eventually leads to ERK activation (3). PAR2 expression and activation are mainly associated with inflammatory diseases (3), but may also play a role in cancer development (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) formed by members of the PAR polymerase (PARP) enzyme family. Poly (ADP)-ribosylation is a post-translational modification that is catalyzed by PARP proteins. This modification involves polymerization of ADP-ribose from NAD+ to target proteins, such as histones and transcription factors, and plays a wide range of biological roles, including the response to DNA damage and transcriptional regulation (1,2). The mammalian PARG enzyme that catalyzes the removal of this modification exists as multiple isoforms. Longer PARG isoforms (100-110 kDa) shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and are responsible for most of the PARG activity. The smaller (65 kDa) isoform resides in the cytoplasm (3-5). Research studies link altered PAR metabolism to inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, as well as neuronal degeneration (6-8). PARG inhibitors that increase PAR levels may sensitize cells to cancer treatments (e.g., cisplatin) and may help in the development of cancer therapies (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Parkin is a protein of 465 amino acids with an amino-terminal ubiquitin domain and a carboxy-terminal RING-box (1). In the case of autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP), deletions have been found in the gene on chromosome 6 encoding the protein Parkin (2).

$305
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. PARP (46D11) Rabbit mAb (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) is useful for immunoprecipitation assays. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PARP (46D11) Rabbit mAb #9532.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$111
20 µl
$261
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PASK is a serine/threonine kinase that contains two PAS (Per-Arnt-Sim) domains (1). Its kinase activity is up-regulated by autophosphorylation of the activation loop within its catalytic domain and is inhibited in cis by one of the PAS domains (1). Studies found that the yeast homolog of PASK phosphorylates and inhibits two enzymes required for glycogen biosynthesis: UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and glycogen synthase, resulting in the decrease of carbohydrate storage (2). Further studies showed that increased glucose levels activate PASK activity and enhance its expression in pancreatic β-cells (3). PASK is essential for the glucose-stimulated expression of preproinsulin and Pdx1, suggesting its role in the regulation of genes involved in pancreatic β-cell functions (3). PASK was shown to be critical for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells (4). The absence of PASK also protects animals from obesity and insulin resistance when they are fed a high-fat diet (4). These findings suggest that PASK functions as an important metabolic sensor in various cells (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PATL1/PAT1b is the human homolog of the evolutionarily conserved Pat1/Mrt1 protein, which was first identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (1,2). This protein is a critical component of the RNA decay machinery in the cytoplasmic processing bodies (P-bodies), localized foci of mRNA silencing and degradation (3). PATL1/PAT1b interacts with many key components of the RNA decay machinery. These include the 5’ decapping proteins DDX6/RCK, DCP1, DCP2, EDC4, and the LSm1–7 ring (3,4) as well as the 3’ deadenylation complex of CAF1-CCR4-NOT1 (3).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PAX5 (D19F8) XP® Rabbit mAb #8970.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Paired box (PAX) proteins are a family of transcription factors that play important and diverse roles in animal development (1). Nine PAX proteins (PAX1-9) have been described in humans and other mammals. They are defined by the presence of an amino-terminal "paired" domain, consisting of two helix-turn-helix motifs, with DNA binding activity (2). PAX proteins are classified into four structurally distinct subgroups (I-IV) based on the absence or presence of a carboxy-terminal homeodomain and a central octapeptide region. Subgroup I (PAX1 and 9) contains the octapeptide but lacks the homeodomain; subgroup II (PAX2, 5, and 8) contains the octapeptide and a truncated homeodomain; subgroup III (PAX3 and 7) contains the octapeptide and a complete homeodomain; and subgroup IV (PAX4 and 6) contains a complete homeodomain but lacks the octapeptide region (2). PAX proteins play critically important roles in development by regulating transcriptional networks responsible for embryonic patterning and organogenesis (3); a subset of PAX proteins also maintain functional importance during postnatal development (4). Research studies have implicated genetic mutations that result in aberrant expression of PAX genes in a number of cancer subtypes (1-3), with members of subgroups II and III identified as potential mediators of tumor progression (2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Paired box (PAX) proteins are a family of transcription factors that play important and diverse roles in animal development (1). Nine PAX proteins (PAX1-9) have been described in humans and other mammals. They are defined by the presence of an amino-terminal "paired" domain, consisting of two helix-turn-helix motifs, with DNA binding activity (2). PAX proteins are classified into four structurally distinct subgroups (I-IV) based on the absence or presence of a carboxy-terminal homeodomain and a central octapeptide region. Subgroup I (PAX1 and 9) contains the octapeptide but lacks the homeodomain; subgroup II (PAX2, 5, and 8) contains the octapeptide and a truncated homeodomain; subgroup III (PAX3 and 7) contains the octapeptide and a complete homeodomain; and subgroup IV (PAX4 and 6) contains a complete homeodomain but lacks the octapeptide region (2). PAX proteins play critically important roles in development by regulating transcriptional networks responsible for embryonic patterning and organogenesis (3); a subset of PAX proteins also maintain functional importance during postnatal development (4). Research studies have implicated genetic mutations that result in aberrant expression of PAX genes in a number of cancer subtypes (1-3), with members of subgroups II and III identified as potential mediators of tumor progression (2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Paired box (PAX) proteins are a family of transcription factors that play important and diverse roles in animal development (1). Nine PAX proteins (PAX1-9) have been described in humans and other mammals. They are defined by the presence of an amino-terminal "paired" domain, consisting of two helix-turn-helix motifs, with DNA binding activity (2). PAX proteins are classified into four structurally distinct subgroups (I-IV) based on the absence or presence of a carboxy-terminal homeodomain and a central octapeptide region. Subgroup I (PAX1 and 9) contains the octapeptide but lacks the homeodomain; subgroup II (PAX2, 5, and 8) contains the octapeptide and a truncated homeodomain; subgroup III (PAX3 and 7) contains the octapeptide and a complete homeodomain; and subgroup IV (PAX4 and 6) contains a complete homeodomain but lacks the octapeptide region (2). PAX proteins play critically important roles in development by regulating transcriptional networks responsible for embryonic patterning and organogenesis (3); a subset of PAX proteins also maintain functional importance during postnatal development (4). Research studies have implicated genetic mutations that result in aberrant expression of PAX genes in a number of cancer subtypes (1-3), with members of subgroups II and III identified as potential mediators of tumor progression (2).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Paired box (PAX) proteins are a family of transcription factors that play important and diverse roles in animal development (1). Nine PAX proteins (PAX1-9) have been described in humans and other mammals. They are defined by the presence of an amino-terminal "paired" domain, consisting of two helix-turn-helix motifs, with DNA binding activity (2). PAX proteins are classified into four structurally distinct subgroups (I-IV) based on the absence or presence of a carboxy-terminal homeodomain and a central octapeptide region. Subgroup I (PAX1 and 9) contains the octapeptide but lacks the homeodomain; subgroup II (PAX2, 5, and 8) contains the octapeptide and a truncated homeodomain; subgroup III (PAX3 and 7) contains the octapeptide and a complete homeodomain; and subgroup IV (PAX4 and 6) contains a complete homeodomain but lacks the octapeptide region (2). PAX proteins play critically important roles in development by regulating transcriptional networks responsible for embryonic patterning and organogenesis (3); a subset of PAX proteins also maintain functional importance during postnatal development (4). Research studies have implicated genetic mutations that result in aberrant expression of PAX genes in a number of cancer subtypes (1-3), with members of subgroups II and III identified as potential mediators of tumor progression (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Paired box (PAX) proteins are a family of transcription factors that play important and diverse roles in animal development (1). Nine PAX proteins (PAX1-9) have been described in humans and other mammals. They are defined by the presence of an amino-terminal "paired" domain, consisting of two helix-turn-helix motifs, with DNA binding activity (2). PAX proteins are classified into four structurally distinct subgroups (I-IV) based on the absence or presence of a carboxy-terminal homeodomain and a central octapeptide region. Subgroup I (PAX1 and 9) contains the octapeptide but lacks the homeodomain; subgroup II (PAX2, 5, and 8) contains the octapeptide and a truncated homeodomain; subgroup III (PAX3 and 7) contains the octapeptide and a complete homeodomain; and subgroup IV (PAX4 and 6) contains a complete homeodomain but lacks the octapeptide region (2). PAX proteins play critically important roles in development by regulating transcriptional networks responsible for embryonic patterning and organogenesis (3); a subset of PAX proteins also maintain functional importance during postnatal development (4). Research studies have implicated genetic mutations that result in aberrant expression of PAX genes in a number of cancer subtypes (1-3), with members of subgroups II and III identified as potential mediators of tumor progression (2).